Brill’s New Pauly

Purchase Access
Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

C

(85 words)

Author(s): Forssman, Bernhard (Erlangen)
[German version] (in linguistics). The third letter of the Greek  alphabet was used for the voiced/g/ (as in New High German Gold) in accordance with the Semitic model; also used for the nasal [], e.g. in ἄγκος ( ánkos). However, the Etruscans gave this letter the sound of [k]; it was also used accordingly in Rome, where later on a new letter was invented for a voiced/g/. More under  G;  K; Italy (alphabetic scripts). Forssman, Bernhard (Erlangen) Bibliography Leumann, 9f. R. Wachter, Altlat. Inschr., 1987, 14-18.

C.

(82 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] Abbreviation of the widespread Roman name Gaius. This abbreviation must have occurred already before the introduction of the letter G into the Roman alphabet by the censor Appius  Claudius Caecus (312 BC). In the Roman system of numbers, C represents the value 100 ( centum), but it probably developed from the Greek aspirate Θ (via its form), which did not have any application as a letter in the early Latin alphabet.  Italy (alphabetic scripts);  Numerical systems Eder, Walter (Berlin)

Cabalis

(129 words)

Author(s): Drew-Bear, Thomas (Lyon)
[German version] (Καβαλίς; Kabalís, Lat. Cabalia). Landscape in Northern Lycia, north-west of the Milyas mountains, south of the Cibyratis, and bordered by the Taurus (Str. 13,15,1) where Lake Cabalitis could be found between Lagbe and Tyraeon (Söğüt Gölü; dry today; here, the inscription documenting the ethnicon Kabaleús was found, cf. [1. 1032]). Hdt. 7,77 refers to the inhabitants as Maeonians; Str.…

Cabbage

(185 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (ῥάφανος, κράμβη, καυλός; rháphanos, krámbē, kaulós; Latin brassica, crambe, caulis, from this Italian cavolo, French chou, German Kohl) is a European vegetable plant ( Brassica oleracea L.) from the Cruciferae family that today is grown in numerous culture strains. It is first mentioned as the heptaphyllous krámbē by Hipponax 40 Diehl (quoted in Ath. 9,370b). Within the rháphanos, Theophr. Hist. pl. 7,4,4 (related by Plin. HN 19,80 to the radish rhaphanís, Latin raphanus) distinguishes, like Cato Agr. 157,1-3 and Ath. 9,369e-f, three varieties of cab…

Cabillon(n)um

(71 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Town by the Arar in Gallia Lugdunensis, today Chalon-sur-Saône. As a river port of the Haedui, C. was of economic importance until the conquest by the Romans. Literary sources: Caes. B Gall. 7,42; 7,90; Str. 4,3,2; Ptol. 2,8,12. In later times, station of the classis Ararica. Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography L. Bonnamour, s.v. Cabillon(n)um, PE, 179f. Grenier 2, 1934, 562-564.

Cabira

(136 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Hellenistic states (Κάβειρα; Kábeira). The residence of Mithridates VI, king of Pontus, on the southern slope of the Paryadres. Pompey elevated C. to city status as Diospolis and then embellished it. C. received numerous new names (Sebaste, Neocaesarea, Hadrianopolis); today, it is Niksar/Turkey with ruins of a large castle that reveals Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Seldshukian building phases. There are also inscriptions, a milestone on the great EW …

Cabiri

(2,062 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(Κάβειροι; Kábeiroi, Lat. Cabiri). A group of divine beings (usually two), appearing occasionally but also one alone. They can be found in a series of local  mystery cults, were not actually Pan-Hellenic, and according to ancient views, were pre-Greek or not even Greek at all (Phrygian or Thracian) (overviews [1; 2]). [German version] A. Name The origin and meaning of the name C. are vague, the spelling not entirely clear: The texts traditionally use Kábeiroi, dialectal inscriptions also refer to Kábiroi. According to ancient thought, th…

Cabiri ceramics

(7 words)

see Vase painting, black-figured

Cabura

(62 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Κάβουρα, Ptol. 6,18,5, erroneously there also Károura), also called Ortospana; probably what is now Kabul on the  Cophen (Sanskrit Kubhā). In the Alexander histories, C. is never mentioned; following the  Bematistai however it is cited by Plin. HN 6,61 as Ortospanum. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography A. Herrmann, s.v. Kabura, RE 10, 1452f. O. Stein, s.v. Ortospanum, RE 18, 1507f.

Cabye, Cambyse

(122 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Καβύη, Καμβύση; Kabýē, Kambýsē). Heroine. Daughter of the Epean Opus in Elis. In order to link the Locrian royal genealogy with the Epean, Pindar has Zeus kidnap the daughter of Opus from Elis, father a son with her in Arcadia, and then bring him to the childless king  Locrus as an adoptive son (Pind. Ol. 9,57; cf. also Diod. Sic. 14,17). According to Aristotle in the Opountíōn politeía, Opus' daughter is called Cambyse (schol. Pind. Ol. 9,86 = Aristot. fr. 561 Rose). Since Plutarch, who referred to her…

Cabyle

(323 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Thraci, Thracia | | Moesi, Moesia (Καβύλη, Kabýlē). City near today's Kabile on the bend of the river Tonzo in the district of Jambol/Bulgaria. Traces of settlements have been documented from the late Bronze Age and the early Iron Age. During the mid 5th cent., C. developed intensive connections to the Aegean region. A mountain sanctuary with Cybele relief was created on the acropolis. In 342/41 BC, C. was conquered by Phi…

Cachales

(71 words)

Author(s): Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
[German version] (Καχάλης; Kachálēs). Tributary to the Cephisus river in Phocis, today called Kakorrema, flowing below the mountain fortress of Tithorea. C. was the source of the city's water supply (Paus. 10,32,11). The Greek name C. means ‘impetuous, noisy river’ (cf. καχλάζειν; kachlázein, ‘to make noise, to roar’). Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan) Bibliography H. v. Geisau, s.v. Kachales, RE 10, 1456 N. D. Papachatzis, Παυσανίου Ελλάδος Περιήγησις 5, 1981, 424 n. 1.

Cacus

(314 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Caca). In the mythology of the Augustan authors (Verg. Aen. 8,190-279; Liv. 1,7,3-15; Prop. 4,9; Ov. Fast. 1,543-586), the battle of Hercules with the cave-dwelling monster C. on the Palatine (where the scala Caci lies [1]) or Aventine (according to Verg.) is important: it had stolen Hercules' cattle and was punished accordingly. The myth provides the aetiology for the cult of Hercules in the Ara Maxima on the Forum Boarium, it also takes up -- with its basic theme of the triumph over the monster -- themes …

Cacyparis

(42 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Κακύπαρις; Kakýparis). River in eastern Sicily, rising near Palazzolo Acreide, its mouth 17 km south-west of Syracusae (Thuc. 7,80,5 on the retreat of the Athenians in 413 BC); modern Cassibile. Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography BTCGI 5, 45-53.

Cadi

(137 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Κάδοι; Kádoi). A city first named by Pol. 33,12,2 near today's Gediz in the headwaters of the Hermus, where the Roman board of ten met with  Attalus [5] II in 155/4 BC. According to Ptol. 5,2,16, C. is located in the border region of Mysia, Phrygia and Lydia. The origin of the city is unknown, probably non-Greek. It is possible that C. was inhabited by Macedonian veterans since the time of Alexander the Great (Plin. HN 5,111). Since Str. 12,8,12 assigns C. to the Phrygía Epíktētos, it is likely that the region of C. came under the rule of Pergamum in 188 BC. C. s…

Cadius

(47 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] L.C. Rufus. Proconsul of Bithynia et Pontus shortly before the year AD 49 when he was sentenced by the Senate because of  repetundae (Tac. Ann. 12,22,3) [1. 159ff]. Readmitted into the Senate by Otho (PIR2 C 6). Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 G. Stumpf, Numismatische Unt., 1991.

Cadmilus

(4 words)

see  Cabiri

Cadmus

(1,073 words)

Author(s): Heinze, Theodor (Geneva) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Drew-Bear, Thomas (Lyon)
(Κάδμος; Kádmos, Lat. Cadmus). [German version] [1] Son of Agenor and Telephassa Son of  Agenor [1] (or Phoenix) and  Telephassa (or Argiope or Tyro), brother (or half-brother) of  Phoenix,  Cilix and others, uncle (or brother) of  Europa [2], husband of  Harmonia, father of  Agave,  Autonoe, Ino,  Semele and of  Polydorus (first mentioned in Hom. Od. 5.333; Kadmeíoi Kadmeíōnes already mentioned in Hom. Il. 4.385 and passim; Hes. Theog. 937; 975-978; at least since Bacchyl. 19.46-51 descendant of Io). In his search for Europa, C. leaves Tyre (Hdt. 2.49.3; Eur. Phoen. 639) or Sidon (Eur. fr. 819 N2) and travels to Greece where the oracle of Delphi advises C. give up his search a…

Caducum

(180 words)

Author(s): Manthe, Ulrich (Passau)
[German version] The lex Papia Poppaea (AD 9), by economic pressure, indirectly forced marriage and the having of children by taking away from unmarried persons the entire capability of inheriting ( capacitas) for a bequest that fell to them in the course of an inheritance, and half the ability to work for married couples without children; married partners amongst themselves had capacitas for one tenth only ( Decuma). The bequest fell, as caducum (‘forfeited’ possessions), to those men named in the testament who had children, otherwise (since Caracalla always) to t…

Cadurci

(101 words)

Author(s): Frezouls, Edmond (Strasbourg)
[German version] Celtic tribe of  Aquitania, neighbours of the Ruteni and the Nitobriges, renowned for their linen (Str. 4,2,2; Plin. HN 19,8) and their cushions ( cadurcum: Juv. 6,537; 7,221; Plin. HN 19,13). The C. gave their name to the modern Quercy. Various settlements of the C. include Uxellodunum, Diolindum, Divona (capital: Ptol. 2,7,9). Monuments: aqueduct, thermae, theatre. Epigraphical evidence: CIL XIII, 1539-48. Frezouls, Edmond (Strasbourg) Bibliography E. Desjardins, Géographie historique et administrative de la Gaule romaine, 1878, 422 G. Gonsalvès, in: D. Schaad, M. Vidal (ed.), Villes et agglomérations urbaines antiques du Sud-Ouest de la Gaule, 1992, 62-66 M. Labrousse, G. Mercadier, Carte archéologique, 1990, 39-66.
▲   Back to top   ▲