Brill’s New Pauly

Purchase Access
Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Naracustoma

(177 words)

Author(s): Cabanes, Pierre (Clermont-Ferrand)
[German version] (Ναράκου στόμα/ Narákou stóma, Latin Naracustoma). One of the delta branches of the Danube (Istrus [2]; Plin. HN 4,79; Apoll. Rhod. 4,310ff.; Arr. Peripl. p. eux. 24,1; Anon. Peripl. m. Eux. 67; Amm. Marc. 22,8,45; Solin. 13,1). Apollonius places it north of the delta branch called the Calostoma (καλὸν στόμα/ kalòn stóma), while Arrian and the anonymous source put it to the south; Pliny, Ammianus and Solinus, like Apollonius, locate the N. between the Calostoma and the Peuce. The N. today corresponds to the river branch known as I…

Naraggara

(172 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] City in Africa Proconsularis, 33 km to the northwest of Sicca Veneria, modern Sidi Youssef. The name, a Libyan inscription [1.570] and a bilingual one in Latin and Neo-Punic  (CIL VIII 1, 4636 = Suppl. 1, 16811 = ILAlg 1,1186) suggest a pre-Roman origin for the city. Evidence: Ptol. 4,3,30 (Ναράγγαρα/ Narángara); Itin. Anton. 41,5; 44,7 ( N.); Tab. Peut. 4,4 ( N.); Geogr. Rav. 39,18 ( Narragara). N. was a city by Roman Law (CIL VIII Suppl. 2, 18085; ILAlg 1,1189). Cultic worship of the Berber god Iocolon (ILAlg 1,1184) and the Punic-Roman goddes…

Naramsin

(450 words)

Author(s): Neumann, Hans (Berlin)
[German version] (Narām-Sîn). Fourth king (2260-2223 BC) of the dynasty of Akkad in Mesopotamia, grandson of the founder of the dynasty, Sargon. Under N. the state of Akkad flourished once again. He is recorded on numerous campaigns that served to increase his power, both through the pillaging of foreign regions and the territorial expansion of the state, the latter primarily pertaining to the upper Mesopotamian region from northern Syria to the eastern Tigris region. In addition N. deployed inten…

Narbo

(635 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Caesar | Caesar | Christianity | Wine | | Coloniae | Gallia/Gaul | Commerce | Limes | Pilgrimage | Punic Wars | Rome | Rome City in Gallia Narbonensis on the right bank of the lower Atax in the territory of the Volcae Arecomici (Strab. 4,1,12), modern Narbonne. In the pre-Roman period there was a settlement here on the mythical road of Heracles from Spain to the Rhône. From the 6th cent. BC, 4 km from N., there was an oppidum on the Montlaurès Hill, which was known by the name of Naro (Avien. 587; [1]). The lagoon between…

Narbonensis

(301 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] The name N. was given in 27 BC to the Roman provincia Transalpina, which was formed from Gaulish areas either side of the Rhodanus (moder Rhone). It had been occupied by the Romans between 125 and 118 BC after a call for help from Massalia in the dispute with the Salluvii tribe. The boundaries of the province were the Mediterranean coast from the Varus (Var) as far as the Pyrenees, the Alps, Lacus Lemanus (Lake Geneva), the upper reaches of the Rhodanus (excluding Lugdunum), the foothills of …

Narce

(210 words)

Author(s): Miller, Martin (Berlin)
[German version] The Faliscan settlement of N. lay on three steep-sided tufa plateaux, 9 km south of Cività Castellana. The three plateaux (Narce, Monte li Santi and Pizzo Piede) successively formed the centres of the settlement. Evidence has been found of late archaic temples on the Pizzo Piede and west of the Monte li Santi; a large flight of steps and a rock throne south of the Monte li Santi also belonged to a sanctuary. The rich necropoleis attest to the importance of the site from the 14th c…

Narcissus

(1,201 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] I. Mythical character (Νάρκισσος/ Nárkissos, Lat. Narcissus). [German version] A. Mythology Narcissus is the personification of a plant by the same name; as with many plants, the etymology may be pre-Greek (Chantraine, vol. 2, s.v.). The aetiological myth of Narcissus is documented only in relatively late sources and is unlikely to be earlier than Hellenistic. Conon [4] (FGrH 26 F 1,26), a mythographer, who knew many local myths, tells of the fate of a handsome youth from Thespiae in Boeotia…

Nardus

(231 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἡ νάρδος/ hē nárdos or τὸ νάρδον/ tò nárdon, Latin nardus, -i f. and nardum, from Hebrew nērd from Sanskrit nalada(m) [1. 657]). Nardos in antiquity designates not only the true Indian spikenard ( Nardostachys jatamansi), but also (according to Plin. HN 13,16 and 12,45-47) as many as nine other plants (cf. inventory [2. 209f.]), including the two aromatic kinds of grass from the Near East, namely Syrian or Assyrian nard, the Valeriana Gallic and Cretan or wild nard, hazelwort, cyprus, etc. From the true nard of the central Himalayas the valuable scented oi…

Naresii

(72 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Ναρήσιοι; Narḗsioi). Illyrian tribe (Ptol. 2,16,8) on the upper and lower Neretva/Hercegovina. The N. were among those conquered by the future Augustus in connection with his Dalmatian campaign (Dalmatae) of 35/33 BC (App. Ill. 47). Incorporated into the Roman province of Illyricum, they participated in the conventus of Narona (Plin. HN 3,143) with 102 decuriae. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography I. Bojanovski, Bosna i Hercegovina u antičko doba, 1988, 379.

Nareste

(45 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] Roman castellum in Dalmatia on the Salona - Narona road (Plin. HN 3,142: N.; Nerate: other MS traditions; Geogr. Rav. 4,16: Netrate; 5,14: Nerente), modern Jesenice east of Split/Croatia. Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) Bibliography A. Mayer, Die Sprache der alten Illyrier, 1957, 240f.

Naristi

(133 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] (Varisti). Germanic tribe next to ( iuxta) the Hermunduri (Tac. Germ. 42,1) and between the Marcomanni and the Quadi (AE 1956, 124), in the vicinity of Pannonia (western Slovakia; cf. [1. 248-251]). Once friends of Rome ([2]; CIL III 4500), during the Marcomannic Wars  they became enemies (SHA Aur. 22,1), against whom Marcus [2] Aurelius campaigned [3. 104f.]; their leader Valao was killed in single combat by M. Valerius Maximianus (AE l.c.). 3,000 N. deserters were settled in the Empire (Cass. Dio 71,21; CIL X 7290 does not mention any N.). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) B…

Narke

(5 words)

see Electric ray

Narnia

(231 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Tribus | Umbri, Umbria | | Coloniae City in Umbria, regio VI, located on a high limestone spur of the Apenninus, 56 miles from Rome, present-day Narni. In the year 299 BC (Liv. 10,10,5) a colony under Latin law was founded there at the site of the Umbrian city of Nequinum, its ominous name (in popular etymology derived from nequire, ‘to be unable’) replaced as it was renamed for the Nahartes in the Nar valley. Municipium of the tribus Papiria, birthplace of the Emperor Nerva [2]; it was of strategic significance in AD 69 …

Naro

(254 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Νάρων; Nár ōn). River in Dalmatia (Dalmates; Strab. 7,5,5; 9; Mela 2,57: Nar; Tab. Peut. 6,4 without name), modern Neretva (in Hercegovina). It rises on the Dumos Planina (1879 m high), passes through the karst mountains in a deeply incised gorge, forms - after a course of 230 km - a swampy delta and flows into the Adriatic. In antiquity the N. flowed into the sea farther to the northwest than today. In its original bed the Norino, which used to join the N. after a much shorter course furthe…

Narona

(519 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Coloniae | Limes | Moesi, Moesia Town (Mela 2,57; Plin. HN 21,40; Itin. Anton. 338,4; Tab. Peut. 6,4) on the Naro (Norino) atop a flat hill in the midst of swampy land in the lower Naro valley near modern Vid, northwest of Metković/Croatia. A prehistoric settlement is assumed; the population and place name were Illyrian. In the 5th/4th cent. BC, Greek settlers joined and founded a trading station near N. ( empórion, Scyl. 24; cf. Theopompus FGrH 115 F 129). In the 2nd/1st cent., settlers from Italy followed. Aft…

Narratio

(5 words)

see Partes orationis

Narsai

(173 words)

Author(s): Brock, Sebastian P. (Oxford)
[German version] Syrian poet ( c. AD 399 - c. 502) and initially head of the ‘Persian School’ in Edessa [2] (possibly until 471), then of the school of Nisibis. Of his writings only about 80 verse homilies ( Mēmrā ) with exegetic, didactic and liturgical content are extant (to date only a few of them are available in translation). One of his mēmrā has as its theme ‘the three teachers’, i.e. Diodorus [20] of Tarsus, Theodorus of Mopsuestia and Nestorius. In his exegesis and Christology, N. was strongly influenced by Theodorus. A series of dialogic poems ( Sōḡyāṯā) on Biblical figures has been…

Narseh

(4 words)

see Narses

Narses

(824 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
(Middle Persian Narseh, Armenian Nersēh, Greek Ναρσῆς/ Narsȇs, also Ναρσαῖος/ Narsaȋos). [German version] [1] Brother of Sapor I, died in AD 302 Brother of Sapor I, when he was prince-governor of (Persian) Armenia in AD 293 he overthrew his great-nephew Wahram III from the Persian throne and documented his success in the Paikuli inscription (cf. [1]). In about 296, N. renewed the conflict with Rome by invading (Roman) Armenia. The emperor Galerius [5] suffered a defeat at Carrhae (Ḥarran) in 297, but was able to besi…

Narthacium

(147 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Ναρθάκιον; Narthákion). Mountain and city in the Othrys mountain range located in the Thessalian region of Achaea Phthiotis. It was at Mount N. , the Xerovouni Avaritsis (1022 m), that, in 394 BC, Agesilaus [2] defeated the Thessalians, who were pursuing him as he retreated from Persia (Xen. Hell. 4,3,9; Plut. Agesilaus 16,5). The city of N. has been localized by inscriptions (middle of the 2nd cent. BC: IG IX 2, 89-91; ArchE 1927/8, 122f.) in the remains of a city (approx. 880 m)…
▲   Back to top   ▲