Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Narthex

(580 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Willers, Dietrich (Berne) | Nielsen, Inge (Hamburg)
(νάρθηξ; nárth ēx). [German version] [1] Yellow-flowering giant fennel (Latin ferula with uncertain etymology). The umbelliferous plant Ferula communis, the yellow-flowering giant fennel, which Theophrastus (H. plant. 6,2,8f., cf. Plin. HN 13,123) describes [1. 61f. and fig. 95-97]. On the coasts of Greece, on the islands and in Lower Italy this plant grows up to 5 m high. The dried stems were used like a cane for punishment, as the ‘sceptre of paedagogues’ ( sceptrum paedagogorum, Mart. 10,62,10 et passim), but also as a cattle goad and the staff of the Bacchants (Thyrs…

Naryca

(461 words)

Author(s): Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
[German version] (Ναρύκα/ Narýka, lit. also Νᾶρυξ/ Nâryx). City in Locris Epicnemidia (Locrians [1]) on the road from the Spercheus Valley via Thermopylae to Phocis, localized by inscriptions found in the church of Hagios Ioannes near Paleokastro at Rengini, approx. 8 km southeast of Mendenitsa ([1], cf. [2]; formerly believed to be at Atalante [3. 1138] or Kalapodi [4. 187]). Given its favourable setting in a fertile valley that was linked to the ocean via Thronion and located on the axis connecting n…

Nasamon

(40 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Νασάμων; Nasámōn). Son of Amphithemis (Garamas according to Apoll. Rhod. 4,1492) and the nymph Tritonis, great-grandson of Minos. N. was the progenitor and eponym of the Nasamones in Libya (schol. Apoll. Rhod. 4,1322). Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)

Nasamones

(182 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Νασαμῶνες; Nasamônes). Libyan tribe, which for a long time was resident in the Great Syrtis. Evidence: Hdt. 2,32,1f.; 4,172-174; Ps.-Scyl. 109 (GGM 1,84); Diod. 3,49,1, who, however, in  17,50 erroneously transplants it to the area north of the oasis of Siwa; Str. 2,5,33; 17,3,20; Plin. HN. 5,33; Ptol. 4,5,21; 30; Tab. Peut. 8,2f. ( Nesamones). In summer the N. grazed their herds near the coast and migrated to the Augila (modern Auǧila) oasis to harvest dates. They buried their dead in a sitting position. They prophesied from dreams …

Nascus

(155 words)

Author(s): Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] Inland ( Nascus, Plin. HN 6,154) city in Arabia Felix (Amm. Marc. 23,6,47). Identical with the Našqum of Ancient Southern Arabian inscriptions, which can be identified with the remains of Al-Baydā (16° 12′ N, 44° 29′ E) in Yemenite Ǧawf. N.'s city walls were an oval 1500 m in circumference. At the beginning of the 7th cent. BC, N. was taken by Karibil Watar on behalf of Saba. According to Str. 16,782, Aelius Gallus occupied the city of Aská (Ἀσκᾶ) in 24 BC, which is traced back by the designation of the inhabitants as Aššūqān; Plin. HN 6,160 counts Nesca among the cities des…

Nasi

(328 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Lienau, Cay (Münster) | Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] I. Greece (Νᾶσοι/ Nâsoi). [German version] [I 1] Lowlands in the area of Caphyae in Arcadia Lowlands in the area of Caphyae in Arcadia (Arcadians), to the south of and below the modern village of Daras (known as Dara until 1940), with luxuriant vegetation, as the water of the upper Orchomenian Plain reemerges here in several springs forming the stream Tragus, which flows into the Ladon [2] (Paus. 8,23,2; 8). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Lienau, Cay (Münster) Bibliography 1 E. Meyer, s.v. N. (1), RE 16, 1793  Ders., Peleponnesische Wanderungen, 1939, 31f., 34, Taf. XI. Pr…

Nasica

(134 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] [1] Roman cognomen Roman cognomen (‘pointed nose’); from the 2nd cent. BC it was hereditary in the family of the Cornelii Scipiones (Cornelius [I 81-85]). The unsuccessful legacy hunter N. (around 30 BC) who was ridiculed by Horace (Hor. Sat. 2,5,57; 65) was not part of the Cornelii family. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina 105; 237. [German version] [2] Town in western India (Νασίκα; Nasíka).Town in western India to the east of the river Namades (Narmada) (Ptol. 7,1,6). Probably present-day Nāsik (old Indian Nāsikya…

Nasidienus Rufus

(57 words)

Author(s): Frigo, Thomas (Bonn)
[German version] Ridiculed by Horace (Hor. Sat. 2,8) as the nouveau riche host of a dinner for Maecenas [2] and his poet friends that, for all its opulence and refinement, ends in banal mishap. (The nomen gentile is attested in only one other place, on an inscription from Cologne: CIL XIII 8270). Frigo, Thomas (Bonn)

Nasidius

(205 words)

Author(s): Frigo, Thomas (Bonn)
[German version] [1] N., L. Cnaeus Pompey's fleet commander in 49 BC Cnaeus Pompeius's fleet commander. In 49 BC he was sent out with a squadron from Dyrrhachium to Massalia to support L. Domitius [I 8] Ahenobarbus (Caes. B Civ. 2,3,1f.. Once there he shirked from a sea battle against D. Iunius [I 12] Brutus Albinus and made his way to Spain without a fight (Caes. B Civ. 2,4,4f.; 7,1f.). After active service in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Bell. Afr. 98,1; Cic. Att. 11,17a,3), N. died in North Africa in 46 BC together with the supporters of Pompeius. MRR 2, 271. Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) [German version] [2] N…

Nasium

(249 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] City of the Leuci in Gallia Belgica (It. Ant. 365,3; Tab. Peut. 2,5; Νάσιον/ Násion, Ptol. 2,9,13) between the rivers Mosella and Matrona [2] in the region of the present-day communities of Naix-aux-Forge and Saint-Amand-sur-Ornain. The Gallo-Roman city, located in the Ornain valley, succeeded a Celtic oppidum (52 ha) situated on the neighbouring hill of Boviolles. N. is located on the military road leading from Durocortorum to Tullum and Divodurum (Tab. Peut. l.c.; It. Ant. l.c.), but its importance in transportation is prim…

Naso

(53 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Widespread Roman cognomen (‘large-nosed’), which does not, however, occur in distinguished families of the Republican period; the family of some of its bearers cannot be determined. The most prominent figure to bear the name was the poet P. Ovidius Naso. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Kajanto, Cognomina, 237 2 Walde/Hofmann 2, 146.

Nastes

(71 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle)
[German version] (Νάστης/ Nástēs). Son of Nomion, commander of the Trojans' Carian allies, together with his brother Amphimachus [3] (cf. Hom. Il. 2,867ff.). He or his brother (the grammatical reference is ambiguous) went to war ‘wearing gold like a girl’ and was killed by Achilles in the river battle. According to Dictys 4,12, both brothers fell to Ajax. Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) Bibliography P. Wathelet, Dictionnaire des Troyens de l'Iliade, 1988, nr. 237.

Nasturtium

(154 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (Latin) corresponds to κάρδαμον/ kárdamon according to Cic. Tusc. 5,99 and describes a type of cress, probably garden cress ( Lepidium sativum), which is mentioned in Xen. Cyr. 1,1,8 as something the ordinary Persian ate with bread. Here it probably means the seeds and not the leaves, which are eaten as salad in present-day Greece and Italy. Both Theophr. Hist. pl. 1,12,1 and Plin. HN. 19,186 mention the mustard-like, sharp taste of kárdamon, and the quick germination is also stressed in Plin. HN 19,117 and 154. For Italy, Columella 11,3,14 recommends…

Nasua

(26 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Leader of the Suebi in 58 BC, name Germanic (?), brother to Cimberius (Caes. B Gall. 1,37,3). Ariovistus; Suebi Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)

Natalis Dies

(5 words)

see Birthday

Natalis templi

(165 words)

Author(s): Baudy, Gerhard (Constance)
[German version] Natalis templi was the day on which a newly erected or restored sanctuary was consecrated to ‘its deity and thereby dedicated to its purpose. A public sacrifice offered each year commemorated this dedicatio and consecratio . The popular ‘temple birthday (Serv. Aen. 8,60) was an official holiday only if it was celebrated on the festival day of the deity involved. Otherwise, it could add a social or political dimension to the traditional celebration days of the gods: craftsmen, for example, congregated at the Roman sanctuary of Minerva on the Aventine on its natalis templi

Natio

(4 words)

see Personification

National research institutes

(30,121 words)

Author(s): Tracy, Stephen | Mussche, Herman | Blackman, David | Wallace-Hadrill, Andrew | Dietz, Søren | Et al.
Tracy, Stephen [German version] I. The American School of Classical Studies (CT) Tracy, Stephen [German version] A. Founding and Building History (CT) Under the leadership of Charles Eliot Norton of Harvard University, scholars from nine American colleges assisted by a small group of influential businessmen established the American School of Classical Studies in Athens (ASCSA) in 1881. Their intention was to create a school where, in Norton's words, “young scholars might carry on the study of Greek thought and life …

National scripts

(579 words)

Author(s): John, James J. (Ithaca, N. Y.)
[German version] This term for the Latin scripts which developed in western Europe between the fall of Rome in the 5th cent. AD and the appearance of Carolingian minuscule in the late 8th cent., was used for the first time by R. P. Tassin and Ch. F. Toustain in their ‘Nouveau traité de diplomatique’ (6 vols., Paris 1750-1765; here vol. 2, p. 481-482), but it goes back already to Jean Mabillon. The latter noted in his ‘De re diplomatica’ (1681; 21709, 45, 49, 343) that in addition to the old Roman script there are four types of early medieval Latin scripts: Gothic, Lombardic…

National Socialism

(19,312 words)

Author(s): Losemann, Volker (Marburg/Lahn) | Mittig, Hans-Ernst
Losemann, Volker (Marburg/Lahn) I. National Socialist Ideology and Classical Studies (CT) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) After initially discussing how some specifically National Socialist (NS) issues in several areas were affected by the interplay with Antiquity, we shall attempt to shed light on the political implications of the scholarly study of both ancient history in Germany and other areas of Classical Studies. As we look at individuals, institutions and concepts - in the universities and beyond -…
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