Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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P.

(73 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] is used as an abbreviation of the Roman name Publius and very often appears on coins and in inscriptions to stand for functions and titles (e.g. PM = pontifex maximus; PP = pater patriae). For the numerous meanings of P in numismatics and epigraphics see [1. 310-319] and [2. XLIV-XLIX]. Eder, Walter (Berlin) Bibliography 1 A. Calderini, Epigrafia, 1974 2 H.Cohen, J.C. Egbert, R. Cagnat, Coin-Inscriptions and Epigraphical Abbreviations of Imperial Rome, 1978.

Pabulatores

(4 words)

see Logistics

Pacatianus

(5 words)

see Claudius[II 46]

Pacatus

(233 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] Latinus P. Drepanius, a rhetor from the region around Bordeaux, lived in the 4th/5th cents. AD and in 390 attained the proconsulship of Africa. He was a friend of  Ausonius and Symmachus, presumably also of  Paulinus [5] of Nola. In 389 P. held a panegyric on the emperor  Theodosius I. In this there was an especially striking accumulation of exempla from the Roman tradition with which P. probably wanted to do justice to the dignity of the res publica [8. 57-61]: P. sees the Roman concept of humanitas realised in the person of Theodosius. Despite …

Paccia

(67 words)

Author(s): Franke, Thomas (Bochum)
[German version] P. Marciana was from Africa (Leptis Magna?); from c. AD 175 she was the first wife of  Septimius Severus (SHA Sept. Sev. 3,2) and died in about AD 185 ([1. nos. 410, 411]; CIL VIII 19494 = ILS 440). Franke, Thomas (Bochum) Bibliography 1 J.M. Reynolds (ed.), The Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitana, 1952. A.R. Birley, Septimius Severus, 21988, 52; 75; 225  PIR2 P 20  Raepsaet-Charlier, 590.

Paccius

(264 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[German version] [1] C.P. Africanus Senator Senator. In probably 67 he became a suffect consul. In 70 he was expelled from the Senate for being found guilty of informing on the Scribonii brothers under Nero [1] (Tac. Hist. 4,41,3). But he must have been readmitted soon after, because in 77/8 he served as proconsul of Africa; there are numerous testimonies to his activities there. PIR2 P 14. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Thomasson, Fasti Africani, 44. [German version] [2] P. Antiochus Pharmacologist in Rome, 1st cent. Pharmacologist, active in Rome, who had great therapeutic…

Paches

(127 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne)
[German version] (Πάχης/ Páchēs). Athenian, son of Epicurus, sent in late autumn 428 BC as a  stratēgós with 1000 hoplites against the disloyal city of Mytilene, which he captured after several months of siege (Thuc. 3,18,3-3,28; Diod. Sic. 12,55,5-10). After operations off the Ionian coast, he also subjugated Antissa, Pyrrha and Eresus (Thuc. 3,28,3; 35,1-2), all on Lesbos [1. 171f.]. On his return, P. was indicted in Athens (at the instigation of Cleon [1]). (The accusation, expressed in Anth. Pal. 7,614, of …

Pachom

(69 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (also called Hierax). Son of Pachom (PP VIII 300b), father of Pamenches, attested as syngenḗs and stratēgós in various Egyptian nomes c. 50/30 BC. Besides his state offices, P. held a number of indigenous priestly offices, which subsequently also appear in the titles of his son. PP I/VIII 265; 301. Ameling, Walter (Jena) Bibliography L. Mooren, The Aulic Titulature in Ptolemaic Egypt, 1975, 119f. Nr. 0127.

Pachomius

(296 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] (Παχώμιος; Pachmios). P. was born in AD 292, probably in Latopolis/Esna, and died of the plague in AD 346. He is regarded as the founder of cenobitic monasticism in Egypt and the author of the first regulations for monks. The Pachomian monastic community, which he founded, is called koinóbion (in the sense of koinōnía, 'community') throughout the Vita prima [2. 24]. P. was born into a pagan Egyptian family and converted to Christianity around the age of twenty when he enrolled in the army. He was baptised after he had returned to the tow…

Pachrates

(85 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Παχράτης/ Pachrátēs). Magician and prophet from Heliopolis [1], proved his craft to emperor Hadrian with the help of a smoke sacrifice to Selene, in recognition of which he received double his fee (PGM 1, P 4,2446ff.). P. may have served as inspiration for the figure of the magician Pancrates in Lucian. Philopseudes 34-36 [1] and is perhaps identical [2. 618f.] with the poet Pancrates [3]. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography 1 K. Preisendanz, s.v. P., RE 18, 2071-2074 2 F. Stoessl, s.v. Pankrates (5), RE 18, 615-619.

Pachymeres, Georgios

(245 words)

Author(s): Wolfram, Gerda (Vienna)
[German version] (Γεώργιος ὁ Παχυμέρης; Geṓrgios ho Pachymérēs). Byzantine universal scholar and humanist, born in 1242 in Nicaea [5], died around 1310. P. held high Church and state offices ( prōtékdikos and dikaiophýlax). He studied philosophy, rhetoric, mathematics and physics with Georgios Akropolites. His important history in 13 volumes [1] deals with events in the period between 1255 and 1308 and is the only extensive historical work from the time of the Palaeologi dynasty. In addition to books on rhetoric and philosophy…

Pachynus

(236 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Falco, Giulia (Athens)
[German version] (Πάχυνος/ Páchynos). Promontory in the extreme south-east of Sicily (more precisely: 8 km northeast from there), today's Capo Pássero, 5 km southeast of today's Pachino. P. was of great importance for navigation as a landmark and measuring point (cf. Str. 2,4,3: distance from Crete; 6,2,11: from Malta; Plin. HN 3,87: from the Peloponnese). Because of the way the island was thought to be orientated, in antiquity P. was usually referred to as the east cape (Str. 6,2,1; Plin. HN 3,87;…

Pacianus

(130 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] After AD 343, bishop of Barcinona (modern Barcelona), died before 393; of his life practically nothing is known. Three letters from him to the Novatian Sympronianus survive, in which he opposes Novatianism (Novatianus) (CPL 561), also a pamphlet Paraenesis sive Exhortatorius Libellus ad Paenitentiam ( Exhortation to Penitence, CPL 562) and a Sermo de Baptismo ( Sermon on Baptism, CPL 563). A Cerv(ul)us ('Stag') against the pagan celebration of the new year, mentioned by Hieronymus  (Vir. ill. 106), is lost. The author was well educated and t…

Paconius

(300 words)

Author(s): Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Name of an Italian gens, attested in Setia (consequently Oscan? ILS 6130) and several trading towns. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] (P.) Lepta, Q. Friend of Cicero and his praefectus fabrum in Cilicia, 51-50 BC Friend of Cicero and his praefectus [7] fabrum in Cilicia 51-50 BC (Cic. Fam. 3,7,4; 5,20,4 et passim). Cic. Fam. 9,13,1-3 points to Cales in Campania as his homeland, where ILS 5779 must attest himself or a son (on the identity [1. 6]). P. often appears in Cicero's letters (e.g. as addressee of Fam. 6,18-19), for the last time in November 44 (Att. 16,15,3). Fündling, Jörg …

Pacorus

(369 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] [1] Member of the Parthian royal house P. (not P. I!), a son of Orodes [2] II; he is central to the first phase of the  Parthian Wars which followed the battle of Carrhae. In 53 BC, P. got engaged to a sister of the Armenian king Artavasdes [2] II, sealing the latter's coming over to the Parthian side. The Parthian invasion of Syria (51-50) was only nominally under the leadership of P., who was still young.  He played a greater part in the great attack on Syria, carried out under his command from 41 onward, but after initial success he died at Gindarus in 38 BC. Parthia Schottky, Mart…

Pactio

(252 words)

Author(s): Kehne, Peter (Hannover)
[German version] In the Roman 'law of nations' p. generally meant (to be precise pactum < pacisci; synonymous  conventio: [1. 136f.]) interstatal agreements without reference to the current legal format (Gell. 1,25,15; Gai. Inst. 3,94; Dig. 49,15,12, compare 2,14,5; Liv. 34,57,7), in the plural it also referred to their content. Given that fides [II.] publica operated in them, the observance of which signified the compliance with the ius gentium (s. ius A. 2.) as a norm of the 'law of nations' ([1. 36]; [2. 6; 11f.]; [4. 75]), the maxim: pacta servanda sunt (agreements should be ob…

Pactolus

(126 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Πακτωλός/ Paktōlós). River in Lydia, originates at the Tmolus mountianrange (Boz Dağları), flows through Sardis and into the Hermus [2]; modern-day Sart Çayı. It was famous for the electron and gold dust washed out near the source (Hdt. 1,93,1; 5,101,2; Plin. HN 5,110), to which the Mermnad kings (Mermnadae) owed their legendary wealth (Archil. fr. 22 D.; Hdt. 6,125). Smelteries were located on the P. in Sardis. By the 1st cent. BC the gold of the P. was exhausted, it seems (Str. 13,1,23; 4,5). Quartz sand containing gold was also found in neighbouring streams. Kaletsch, …

Pactum

(1,006 words)

Author(s): Halbwachs, Verena Tiziana (Vienna)
[German version] A. Concept Pactum is a formless arrangement, an agreement with varying content (Dig. 2,14; Cod. Iust. 2,3); cf. Dig. 2,14,1, 1-2: “Pactum autem a pactione dicitur (inde etiam pacis nomen appellatum est) et est pactio duorum pluriumve in idem placitum et consensus ”- "Pactum, a formless agreement, is derived from the word pactio (hence the expression pax, peace, is also coined) and pactio is the agreement and the consent between two or more people concerning the same thing". In the realm of unauthorized actions, the original meaning of pactum was that of an atonement …

Pactumeius

(358 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] [1] Q. Aurelius P. Clemens Senator from Africa, 2nd cent. AD He was admitted to the Senate by Vespasian and Titus as a praetor and was one of the first senators from Africa. His brother is P. [3]. PIR2 P 36. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] P.P.Clemens Roman senator and lawyer Roman senator, lawyer and descendant of P. [1]. ILS 1067 from Cirta, his home town, sets out his cursus honorum ; it led him via the praetorship, a cura for the tax assessment of Syrian municipalities ( ad rationes civitatium Syriae putandas) to the praetorian governorship of Cilicia, duri…

Pactye

(89 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Πακτύη/ Paktýē). Fortress on the Propontic coast of Chersonesus [1], to the south of present-day Bolayır Iskelesi (Ps.-Scyl. 67; Str. 7a,1,52; 54; 56). Here stood the east end of the wall which ran from Miltiades [1] via the Chersonesus [1] to Cardia (Hdt. 6,36; Scymn. 711). Alcibiades [3] retreated here in 407 BC after the loss of his position as strategos (Nep. Alcibiades 7,4; Diod. Sic. 13,74,2). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography Müller 2, 895f.  B. Isaak, The Greek Settlements in Thrace until the Macedonian Conquest, 1988.
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