Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Ragusa

(458 words)

Author(s): Niehoff, Johannes (Freiburg)
[German version] (Lat. Ragusium, Greek Ῥαούσιον/ Rhaoúsion, Slavic Dubrovnik; regarding the name cf. [1]), city on the Dalmatian coast. The beginnings of the trading city that was to become so famous a rival of Venice on the Adriatic Sea were hazy already for the historians of R. at the time of Humanism so that they arrived at different legends of its origin reminiscent of the type of ancient aetiology (cf. the depictions in [2; 3; 4]). The report by Constantinus [1] Porphyrogennetus (Const. de administ…

Rainbow cup

(181 words)

Author(s): Stumpf, Gerd (Munich)
[German version] Folk term for a Celtic gold coin shaped like a small cup. According to folk belief RCs could be found where a rainbow touched the earth. RCs, which could often be found in ploughed fields after heavy rainfall, were thought to bring luck and had many different effects ascribed to them. On the obverse RCs have an abstract head or a smooth bump, sometimes a star, a hand, writing, an ornament, a cross or a bird's head. The reverse is concave, often with a representation of a torque (Torques) with spheres in it. It is esp. the Celtic t…

Ramesses

(1,111 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
Name of eleven pharaohs, Egyptian R-msj-sw (“Re (the sun god) is the one who gave him birth”), vocalized Rīamašeša in Babylonian, rendered in Greek by Ῥαμέσσης and the like. [German version] [1] R. I Dynasty founder (Throne name Mn-pḥtj-R). The founder of the 19th dynasty ( c. 1292-1290 BC) came from a non-royal family (from the eastern Delta?) and was a high-ranking officer before he was named as vizier and heir to the throne by his predecessor Haremhab. His son Sethos I was probably immediately designated as his successor. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) [German version] [2] R. II Egy…

Rammius

(49 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Q. R. Martialis. Equestrian of whose offices only the praefectura vigilum between AD 111 and 113 and the praefectura Aegypti between 117 und 119 are attested. In Egypt he had to deal with the aftermath of the Jewish rebellion. PIR2 R 20. Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Ramnes

(275 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] Ramnes, Titi(ens)es and Luceres (as in Liv. 1,36,2, but in 1,13,8 and Cic. Rep. 2,20,36: R(h)amnenses) are the  Etruscan (Varro Ling. 5,55; see also [1. 218, 581]) names of the three tribus established by Romulus [1] (according to Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,14,2 and Gell. NA 15,27: organised by families) which were each divided into 10 curiae and thus formed the primary structuring of the Roman people and army (30×10 equestrians, 30×100 infantry: Varro Ling. 5,89; Liv. 1,13,8). Ennius's derivation of the term R. from Rom…

Ranius

(207 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] C. R. Castus Legate of the procos. of Asia, AD 126/7 Senator whose nomen gentile could also be Granius. Legate of the procos. of Asia in AD 126/7, PIR2 R 23. Perhaps identical with the cos. suff. Castus of the year 142 [1] whom fragment S of the Fasti Ostienses mentions [2]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 W. Eck, P. Weiß, Tusidius Campester, cos. suff. unter Antoninus Pius und die Fasti Ostienses zum J. 141/2, in: ZPE 134, 2001, 251-260. 2 FO2 52. [German version] [2] L. R. Optatus Senator, cons. suff. probably under Septimius Severus Senator; his career is known …

Ranunculus

(157 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (βατράχιον/ batráchion = σέλινον ἄγριον/ sélinon ágrion in Dioscorides), buttercup, crowfoot. The widespread family of the Ranunculaceae has more than 100 species in Greece and Italy. The Greek and Latin names for the plant seem to be derived from' frog' (βάτραχος/ bátrachos, Lat. rana), owing to its preference for damp locations. Dioscorides (2,175 Wellmann = 2,206 Berendes) and Pliny (HN 25,172 f.) describe the appearance of four species; it is impossible today to determine exactly which. The leaves and stems in poultice…

Rape

(1,016 words)

Author(s): Hartmann, Elke (Berlin)
[German version] I. Concept In modern usage, rape denotes violent, forcible sexual intercourse which is declined by the person forced. A corresponding ancient term does not exist. The Greek and Roman terminology for describing the offence of rape only partially indicates the violence associated with the act (e.g. βιάζεσθαι/ biázesthai, Latin violare: to use violence; ἁρπαγή/ harpagḗ, Latin rapina: robbery); it is not uncommon for the violent aspect to be obscured; sometimes the degradation associated with the rape of the victim is indicated (διαφθείρειν/ diaphtheírein: corrupt;…

Raphael

(177 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Literally 'God heals', Gr. Ραφαήλ/ Rhaphaḗl; cf. the personal name in 1 Chr 26:7). In Jewish angelology, one of the four (or seven) archangels who have a special role in the celestial hierarchy for their praise and glorification of God before His throne (1 Enoch 9,1; 20,3; 40,9). True to his name, R. is the angel of healing (cf. Hebr. rāfā, 'to heal'), ruling over "all illnesses and all torments of the children of men" (1 Enoch 40,9). He plays a significant role in the Book of Tobit, where, disguised as Tobias' travelling companion, he d…

Rapidum

(175 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Limes City in Mauretania (III. B.) Caesariensis, about 24 km to the west of Auzia on the Limes (Limes VIII.C., with map), modern Sour Djouab (It. Ant. 30,7: Rapidi; 38,9: Rapido castra). In AD 122 Hadrianus founded a castrum at R. (CIL VIII suppl. 3, 20833). In 167 the veterani et pagani consistentes aput R. ('veterans and farmers at R.') built the walls of the city adjacent to the castrum  (CIL VIII suppl. 3, 20834 f.). After being destroyed more than once, R., then a municipium , was rebuilt by Diocletianus…

Rapina

(218 words)

Author(s): Ebner, Constanze (Innsbruck)
[German version] Robbery in Roman law, originally contained in furtum ('theft'), then an offence (prosecuted separately by the praetor) leading to actio vi bonorum raptorum ('action for the robbery of goods by violence') with the sanction of fourfold damages, simple damages after one year. The surviving edict text (Dig. 48,7,2 pr.) covers banditry ( dolo malo hominibus armatis coactisque damnum datum, 'injury done with evil intent by a body of armed men') and robbery ( bona rapta, lit. 'seized goods'). It is a matter of dispute whether the Edict of Licinius [I 27] Lucul…

Rapinium

(29 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Small site fit for landing ( positio, Itin. Maritimum 498,6 f.) on the coast of Etruria between Centumcellae and Graviscae, modern Bagni Sant'Agostino. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Raptus

(143 words)

Author(s): Ebner, Constanze (Innsbruck)
[German version] In Roman law abduction (as a rule of a woman) for sexual purposes (also with the intent of marriage). In the Republican period an iniuria (tort in civil law), later probably prosecuted as a crimen vis (crime of violence). Reorganised by Constantine the Great (Cod. Theod. 9,24,1) with the death penalty for all participants, the consenting woman as accomplice; even a reluctant one would lose the right to succeed to her parents (beginning of the 4th cent.). In the 6th cent., Justinian (Cod. Iust. 9,…

Raqqa

(187 words)

Author(s): Hausleiter, Arnulf (Berlin)
[German version] ( al-Raqqa/ ar-Raqqa). Modern Syrian provincial capital at the confluence of the Balīḫ and the Euphrates. For its history up to the 4th cent., see Nicephorium. Since 638/9, the town has been Arab. After al-Rāfiqa was built west of R. by the caliph al-Manṣūr (772) there was expansion on a grand scale by Hārūn al-Rašīd and a temporary (796-808) relocation of the Abbasid residence, which was only later named R. and further expanded. It was destroyed by Saladdin in 1182, and then came u…

Rarus

(56 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] Otherwise unknown author of an aphoristic epigram (the Anthologia Planudea attributes it to Palladas): an unfaithful friend is more to be feared than an open enemy (Anth. Pal. 10,121). The motif is quite common (see, e.g., Anth. Pal. 10,36; 95; 11,390; as early even as Thgn. 91 f.). Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)

Ras Šamra

(5 words)

see Ugarit

Rat

(364 words)

Author(s): Thüry, Günther E. (Salzburg)
[German version] Graeco-Roman Antiquity did not distinguish between the mouse and the rat. However, bone finds, excavations, etc. since 1975 , in particular, have shown the presence of rats in the ancient Mediterranean area and elsewhere in Europe outside the Mediterranean area. According to the current state of research, the following can be regarded as proven: a) The black rat ( Rattus rattus L.), originating in Asia, had arrived in the Mediterranean region by the Hellenistic or early Imperial Period ([1. 132; 2. 62-63]; on the considerably earlier incide…

Ratae

(177 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Roman fort in Britannia, built before AD 50 at the site of an Iron-Age settlement on the present-day Soar River and held for c. 20 years. The fort and its vicus grew into the core of a prosperous town (It. Ant. 477,4; Ptol. 2,3,20: Ῥάγε/Rháge; CIL VII 1169; cf. CIL XVI 160), present-day Leicester [1. 52 f.]. Already before AD 100, R. was the main city of the Coritani or Corieltauvi [2]. The forum and the basilica were built under Hadrian (AD 117-138), the baths in c. AD 150. Parts of the baths have survived as the Jewry Wall, as…

Ratiaria

(123 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Thraci, Thracia | | Coloniae | Daci, Dacia | Moesi, Moesia | Rome Roman colony in Moesia superior, later the capital of Dacia Ripensis (Daci, with map), modern Arčar (oblast Vidin, Bulgaria). The settlement lay on the right bank of the Danube on the important road from Singidunum to Oescus and further eastwards. R. was the camp of the  Legio XIII Gemina and the port of a river fleet (Not. Dign. Or. 42,43). There is evidence of an arms factory there (Not. Dign. Or. 11,38). Archaeological finds, inscriptions and coins. Burian, Jan (P…

Ratiocinatio

(4 words)

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