Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics

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Subject: Language and Linguistics

Edited by: Geoffrey Khan
Associate editors: Shmuel Bolozky, Steven Fassberg, Gary A. Rendsburg, Aaron D. Rubin, Ora R. Schwarzwald, Tamar Zewi

The Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics Online offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of the Hebrew language from its earliest attested form to the present day.
The Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics Online features advanced search options, as well as extensive cross-references and full-text search functionality using the Hebrew character set. With over 850 entries and approximately 400 contributing scholars, the Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics Online is the authoritative reference work for students and researchers in the fields of Hebrew linguistics, general linguistics, Biblical studies, Hebrew and Jewish literature, and related fields.

For correct display of diacritics download the Brill Truetype font Brill: see Help.
For correct display of Hebrew we advise downloading SBL Hebrew: SBL Hebrew.

Subscriptions: Brill.com

Due to the importance of the reference work users are advised of two presentational issues:

For correct display of diacritics download the Brill Truetype font Brill: see Help.
For correct display of Hebrew we advise downloading SBL Hebrew: SBL Hebrew.

Some of the lemmas use non-unicode characters to represent the Babylonian vocalization of Hebrew. There is a non-unicode font available that contains the necessary characters, but this is difficult to integrate with the Brill Unicode-based online platform. As a temporary solution in beta, the non-unicode characters are presented as bitmaps and a link will be added to the correct pdf-version of these lemmas, taken from the print version. In 2014, the online platform will be updated in order to enable the presentation of non-unicode characters and strings.

For your convenience, please find below the PDF for entries that contain non-unicode characters for the Babylonian vocalization of Hebrew.