Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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A.

(35 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] Abbreviation of the common Roman name Aulus. A. is of Etruscan origin (Aules?) and was also used as a cognomen in the imperial period. Eder, Walter (Berlin) Bibliography Salomies, 11, 24, 165.

A. A.

(52 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] Abbreviation of the blanket name A(ulus) A(gerius), which, in Roman juristic writing, serves as the designation for the plaintiff (  actio ). N(umerius) N(egidius) stands for the defendant. In addition, the names Titius, Gaius or Sempronius are used for the designation of a third party. Eder, Walter (Berlin)

Aalen

(86 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Largest auxiliary fort (6.07 hectares) on the upper German/Raetian   limes , a forward post for the ala II Flavia milliaria from  Aquileia [2].  Principia excavated in modern times. Oldest inscription from AD 163/4, extensive alterations AD 208. Large   vicus . Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography K. Dietz, Die Erneuerung des Limeskastells A. vom J. 208 n. Chr., in: Acta praehistorica et archaeologica 25, 1993, 243-252 M. Luik, Der Kastellvicus von A., in: Fundber. Baden-Württemberg 19, 1994, 265-355 D. Planck, A., Ostalbkreis: Arch. Plan des röm. Kas…

Aaron

(228 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Post-Biblical traditions of A. are designed to idealize this figure, who appears ambivalent in the Biblical tradition (e.g. the Golden Calf episode), against a background of disputes starting with  Menelaus over the office of High Priest, which had abandoned hereditary succession, and thus affirming that A. (and his successors) were worthy of the office. The  Qumran community, which broke with the Jerusalem community of worship in protest over the progressive desacralization of th…

Abacaenum

(151 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Ἀβάκαινον; Abákainon). Town of the Siculi on a steep hillside near the modern Tripi, c. 10 km south-east of the city of Tyndaris to which, at its foundation in 396 BC, Dionysius I added a large amount of A.'s territory (Diod. Sic. 14,78,5). Listed among the theorodokoi in  Delphi (beginning of 2nd cent. BC; IG XIV 382 a-d; [3. 420; 431]). Continued to exist into late antiquity. Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography 1 A. Bertino, Atti IV del Convegno di Numismatica Napoli, 1973, 105 ff. 2 R. Calciati (ed.), Corpus Nummorum Siculorum 1, 1983, 73-75 3 …

Ab actis

(6 words)

see  Actis, ab

Abacus

(548 words)

Author(s): Binder, Gerhard (Bochum)
[German version] Like the Greek ἄβαξ, ἀβάκιον ( ábax, abákion), Latin abacus refers to various objects, made from a variety of materials, and which have the characteristics of a ‘platter, board, panel, or slab’: 1. the board used for board games and dice games ( Board games); 2. the platter used for serving food ( Table utensils); 3. a decorative wall panel ( Decorum, wall cladding); 4. the slab covering the capital of a column ( Column). 5. Often, abacus signifies a dresser or sideboard, most usually for the decorative display of valuable items. Thus Cicero says about Verres: abaci …

Abacus

(2 words)

Abae

(254 words)

Author(s): Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Macedonia, Macedones | Oracles (Ἄβαι, Ἀβαί; Ábai, Abaí). Situated in eastern  Phocis on a rocky outcrop at the edge of the plain which borders the pass of  Hyampolis (about 2.5 km distance) near the modern Exarchos, on the road from Orchomenus to Opus (Paus. 10,35,1-5). Name derived from its Argive founder  Abas (Paus. loc. cit.). Seat of an oracle of Apollo (Hdt. 1,46; 8,27; 33; 133; Paus. loc. cit.; Str. 9,3,13; Diod. Sic. 16,58,3-6; Syll.3 552); fortress on the access to Phocis from  Locris Opuntia and  Boeotia (D…

Abammon

(5 words)

see Iamblichus [1]

Abantes

(63 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
[German version] (Ἄβαντες; Ábantes). A. is the name given even by Homer (Il. 2,536 ff.; 4,464) to the inhabitants of the island of  Euboea, also known as Abantis (Str. 10,1,3; Paus. 5,22,3). In historical times, the name A. only survives in the phyle Abantis of the town of  Chalcis (CIL XII 9,946). Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) Bibliography E. Meyer, s. v. A., in: LdA 1,61.

Abantiades

(38 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Each descendant of  Abas [1], such as Acrisius (Ov. Met. 4,607), Canethus (Apoll. Rhod. 1,78), Idmon (Apoll. Rhod. 2,815) and Perseus, the great-grandson of Abas (Ov. Met. 4,673 and passim). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)

Abantidas

(64 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Ἀβαντίδας; Abantídas). Son of Paseas and related through marriage to the family of  Aratus [2] (tyrant of Sicyon 264-252 BC); having come to power due to the murder of the tyrant Cleinias, he was killed by Deinias and the otherwise unknown dialectician Aristoteles (Plut. Arat. 2,2; 3,4; Paus. 2,8,2) [1. 394]. Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) Bibliography 1 H. Berve, Die Tyrannis bei den Griechen, 1967.

Abaris

(380 words)

Author(s): Baudy, Gerhard (Constance)
[German version] (Ἄβαρις). Mythical figure derived from the cult of Apollo, formed on the model of shamanistic miracle-working priests [1; 2; 3; 4]. Dated by Pindar in the time of Croesus (fr. 270 Maehler), also dated earlier by other authors [5. 16]. According to Hdt. 4,36 A., coming from the imaginary northern land of the  Hyperborei, carried the spear of  Apollo around Greece, without partaking of any food. He prophesied in a state of divine possession (Lycurg. fr. 86 = Orat. Att. p. 271 Baiter…

Abarnias

(93 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Abarnis, Abarnos, Ἀβαρνίας; Abarnías). Abarnias is the name given by ancient authors to the coastline 5 km north-east of  Lampsacus (Apoll. Rhod. 1,932; Orph. A. 489) [1. 93 f.] which belonged to the territory of this polis. During the battle of  Aegospotami (405 BC), the main sails of the Spartan fleet were stored there (Xen. Hell. 2,1,29). Steph. Byz. (s.v. A.) is the only source also to refer to a polis of the same name. Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography 1 W. Leaf, Strabo on the Troad, 1923. G. Hirschfeld, s. v. Abarnis, RE 1, 17.

Abartus

(74 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Descendant of the Athenian king Codrus. Was brought to the city of Phocaea, together with the Codrideans Deoites and Periclus, from Erythrae and Teos, because the Ionians did not want to accept Phocaea in the Ionian league until it had Codrians as kings (Paus. 7,3,10). The myth legitimated the claim of Athens to hegemony over Ionia. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) Bibliography A. Sakellariou, La migration grecque en Ionie, 1958, 238, n. 3.

Abas

(302 words)

Author(s): Schachter, Albert (Montreal) | Nutton, Vivian (London)
(Ἄβας). [German version] [1] Figure from Myth of the Peloponnese and central Greece Myth of the Peloponnese and central Greece: a) Argus. Son of Lynceus and Hypermestra. By Aglaea, daughter of Mantineus, father of the twins Acrisius and Proetus (Apollod. 2,24; Hes. fr. 129 M-W; cf. Paus. 2,16,2; 10,35,1) and Idomene, mother of Bias and Melampus by Amythaon (Apollod. 2,24). Lynceus gave A. the shield, consecrated by Danaus to Hera, and for whose festival he had established the agon ἄσπις ἐν Ἄργει (Hyg. Fab. 1…

Abascantus

(54 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (Ἀβάσκαντος; Abáskantos). Athenian from Cephisia, son of Eumolpus, from AD 135/6 34 years παιδοτρίβης δια βίου ( paidotríbēs dia bíou) (CIA 3,1112; 740 and passim), died after 169/70 Traill, PAA, 101125). His son A. (Traill, PAA, 101135) was κοσμητὴς τῶν ἐφήβων ( kosmētḕs tôn ephḗbōn) 192/3-200/1 (CIA 3, 1159). Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)

Abascantus

(6 words)

see  Flavius Abascantus, T.

Abasci, Abchasians

(230 words)

Author(s): Sigel, Dorothea (Tübingen)
[German version] (Ἀβασκοί; Abaskoí, Arr. Peripl. p. eux. 11,3 Roos, Ἀβασγοί, Ἄβασγοι, Orph. A. 754). West Caucasian people ( Caucasus) north of  Colchis, in the territory between the river Singames (today Inguri) and the harbour city Pityus (today Pizunda), mentioned by Byzantine authors as Ἀβασγία ( Abasgía; patria Abasgia, Geogr. Rav.) in the Georgian chronicle Aphchazethi. In the Roman imperial era they were partially independent; from Hadrian they received Rhesmagas as regulus (Arr. Peripl. p. eux. 11,3 (Roos); under Theodosius I the alaI Abasgorum had its quarters in the…

Abastani

(87 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Ἀβαστάνοι; Abastánoi), also Abastanes. Indian people (Arr. Anab. 6,15,1), called ‘Sambastai’ at Diod. Sic. 17,102,1, ‘Sabarcae’ at Curt. 9,8,4-7, settled near the confluence of the  Acesines and the Indus rivers and were neighbours of the  Malli. Described as a warlike, yet democratic people, conquered by Perdiccas. Probably for Old Indian Ambaṣṭha (see [1. 87 f.]), a western people mentioned in the Aitareyabrāhmaṇa and in the Puranic̣ ethnic lists. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography 1 P. H. L. Eggermont, Alexander's campaign in Southern Punja…

Abaton

(407 words)

Author(s): Chaniotis, Angelos (Heidelberg)
[German version] Sacred site in the countryside, seat of a numinous power, to which entry was totally forbidden, in order to protect this power from contamination or to be protected from it oneself. The site is often fenced off from the secular world by a wall, and is not available for any human use. A particular form of the abaton is a site that had been struck by lightning (ἠλύσιον, ἐνηλύσιον cf.  bidental), at which an altar to Zeus  Kataibates has been consecrated [1], e.g. in Athens (Aesch. PV. 358-9; IG II2 4964-4965), Olympia (Paus. 5,14,10), Paros (IG XII 5,233), Melos (IG XII…

Abba

(74 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Ἄββα; Ábba, varia lectio Obba, Liv. 30,7,10). Town in   Africa proconsularis .  Syphax retreated to A. in 203 BC, after his encampment near  Utica had been burned down by C.  Laelius and  Massinissa (Pol. 14,6,12; 7,5). A.'s location most likely corresponds to either the modern Henchir Bou Djaoua or Henchir Merkeb en-Nabi [1. 430 f.]. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 F. W. Walbank, A Historical Commentary on Polybius 2, 1967. AATun 100, sheet 29, no. 87 f.

Abbahu

(93 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Jewish teacher and rabbi ( c. AD 250-320), head of the school in Caesarea [3]. A., who knew Greek language and culture, is famous because of his disputations with the so-called ‘Minim’ (heretics). It is a matter of controversy whether Christians were among A.'s discussion partners. Furthermore, he supposedly kept his city's Samaritan priests away from the Jewish community and in ritual matters equated the Samaritans with gentiles. Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) Bibliography L. J. Levine, Caesarea under Roman Rule, SJLA 7, 1975 S.T. Lachs, Rabbi A. and the Minim, in: …

Abbasids

(143 words)

Author(s): Schönig, Hanne (Halle/Saale)
[German version] (Abbāsids). Islamic dynasty (AD 750-1258). The accession of the A. occurred after a weakening of the  Omayyads by disputes over succession, tribal conflicts, social alienation and Iranian influences, which were expressed in a new orientation towards the East. In 763 the capital relocated from Damascus to Baghdad. Intellectual life profited from the multinational constellation. Scientific, cultural and literary flowering characterized by Hellenistic and Iranian influences under ca…

Abbir

(177 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
There are references to four north African places of that name: [German version] [1] A. (without addition) A. (without addition): mentioned in Acta conc. I 1112 A Hardouin and Not. episc. proc. Afr. 2a. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) [German version] [2] A. Cella A. Cella: CIL VIII 1, 893; Suppl. 1, 12344. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) [German version] [3] A. Germaniciana A. Germaniciana: Acta conc. I 164 A; 1252 A Hardouin. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) [German version] [4] A. Maius A. Maius: AE 1975, 243 no. 872; Acta conc. I 1085 B Hardouin. These four places can possibly be reduced to just two: A. Cella or Maius and A.…

Abbius

(92 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Oppianicus, Statius. Roman knight from Larinum. He tried to have his stepson A.  Cluentius Habitus poisoned and was therefore accused by him of murder in 74 BC, convicted, and died in exile in 72.  Cicero defended Cluentius against the counterclaim of the stepmother in 66 that Cluentius had tried to poison A. and accused the latter of the murder of other family members, falsification of the will, bribing of judges, and other crimes (Cic. Clu. passim). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography C.J. Classen, Recht, Rhet., Politik, 1985, 15-119 Nicolet 2, 755-756.

Abbreviatio

(4 words)

see  Brevitas

Abbreviations

(12,530 words)

A&A Antike und Abendland A&R Atene e Roma AA Archäologischer Anzeiger AAA Annals of Archaeology and Anthropology AAAlg S. Gsell, Atlas archéologique de l’Algérie. Édition spéciale des cartes au 200.000 du Service Géographique de l’ Armée, 1911, repr. 1973 AAHG Anzeiger für die Altertumswissenschaften, publication of the Österreichische Humanistische Gesellschaft AArch Acta archeologica AASO The Annual of the American Schools of Oriental Research AATun 050 E. Babelon, R. Cagnat, S. Reinach (ed.), Atlas archéologique de la Tunisie (1:50.000), 1893 AATun 100 R. Cagnat, A. Merli…

Abbreviations

(2,775 words)

Author(s): Giovè Marchioli, Nicoletta (Triest) | Eleuteri, Paolo (Venice) | Menci, Giovanna (Florence)
[German version] A. General An abbreviation (Latin notae, sigla, siglae) consists of a semantic element -- the alphabetic lettering of the abbreviated word -- and a symbolic element, signs referring to the summarizing character of what is written. The use of abbreviations is justified for a number of practical reasons: first, because they make reading quikker and more accurate, and secondly, because they save time and space. In classical antiquity and, in a wider sense, right up to the late Middle Ages,…

Abbreviations used in the Bibliographies

(260 words)

This list contains abbreviations of English, German, French, Italian and Latin words used in the bibliographies. Abh. Abhandlung Acad. Academia, Académie, Academy Act. acta, acts, actes Akad. Akademie Akt. Akten Alt. Altertum ant. antike Anz. Anzeiger app./App. appendix, appendices/Appendizes Arch./arch. Archäologie/archäologisch archa. archaisch AT altes Testament att. attisch Bed. Bedeutung Beih. Beiheft Beil. Beilage Beitr. Beitrag Ber. Bericht Bull. Bulletin, Bullettino byz. byzantin(ist)isch Cat. Catalogue, Catalogo Cod. Codex, Codices, Codizes Coll. Collectio…

Abdagaeses

(99 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] Parthian noble from the house of Suren, who in AD 36 supported the counter-king  Tiridates against  Artabanus [5] II and after Tiridates' failure fled to Syria (Tac. Ann. 6,31 and passim). Whether he is identical to the homonymous troop leader of Artabanus (Ios. Ant. Iud. 18,9,4) is just as uncertain as his possible relation to the Indo-Parthian King Abdagases (1st cent. AD). Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) Bibliography E. Herzfeld, in: AMI 4, 1932, 75 ff. M. Karras-Klapproth, Prosopographische Studien zur Gesch. des Partherreiches, 1988 J. Markwart, in: ZDMG 49…

Abdalonymus

(57 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Impoverished offspring of a king of  Sidon, put in the place of Straton as city-king by  Alexander [4] and outfitted richly. Embellished in Curt. 4,2,15-26 and Diod. Sic. 17,47 as a philosophical novella. He is probably the person for whom the  Alexander Sarcophagus was made. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve II no. 1.

Abdemon

(70 words)

Author(s): Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough)
[German version] Phoenician from Tyre (Diod. Sic. 14,98) or Citium (Theopomp. FGrH 115 F 103), who murdered the Tyrian usurper of Salamis c. 415 BC (Isoc. Or. 9,26).  Evagoras, who fled to Soli under A., returned in 411 (Isoc. Or. 9,26-32; Diod. Sic. loc. cit.) and restored the Greek monarchy. Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough) Bibliography H. Berve, Die Tyrannis bei den Griechen, 1967, 341 F. G. Maier, Cyprus and Phoenicia, CAH 62, 312.

Abdera

(343 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] City on Cape Bouloustra This item can be found on the following maps: Thraci, Thracia | Colonization | Macedonia, Macedones | Moesi, Moesia | Peloponnesian War | Pergamum | Persian Wars | Pompeius | Punic Wars | Athenian League (Second) (Ἄβδηρα; Ábdēra). City on Cape Bouloustra, in the Aegean, 16 km north-east of the mouth of the Nestus; founded and fortified in 656 BC by Ionian  Clazomenae; destroyed by Thracians at the beginning of the 6th cent. BC. Archaeologically attested archaic graves. From 545 BC, a second fou…

Abderus

(82 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Son of Hermes or Poseidon (Pind. Paean 2), Opuntic Locrian, favourite of Hercules and eponymous hero of the Thracian city Abdera. For Hercules he guarded the human-flesh-eating mares, stolen from the Bistonian king Diomedes, and in so doing, he was himself eaten by them. Hercules founded Abdera on his grave site (Apollod. 2,97) and instigated annually an agone, which was conducted without horse races (Philostr. Imag. 2,25). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) Bibliography J. Boardman, s. v. A., LIMC 1.1, 1.

Abdias

(125 words)

Author(s): Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
[German version] A collection of apocryphal acts of the Apostles in Latin ( Historia Certaminis Apostolici or Historiae Apostolicae) frequently used in the MA, is attributed to A., supposedly the first bishop of  Babylon and a contemporary of  Origenes. It consists of 10 books purportedly compiled in Hebrew by A. and then translated by  Eutropius into Greek and by Julius, who was known to write in Greek, into Latin. However, the collection presupposes  Rufinus' History and must have been created in the 6th-7th cents.  Apocrypha Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) Bibliography W. Smith and H. …

Abdicatio

(318 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (‘Renunciation’, ‘Rejection’) means in a general sense the renunciation of a duty, habit or conviction, but also the formally underlined rejection like the termination of a friendship, refutation of a vice or the Christian renunciation of pagan gods (Cic. Orat. 2,102; Leo the Gr. Sermo. 72,5). Abdicatio acquired a special meaning in legal language: 1. In constitutional law: the premature resignation of an office (also renuntiatio); this can happen voluntarily for political reasons, especially with dictators and consuls (typical reasons include …

Abdissares

(87 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] A king of Armenia known from coins, to whom the twelfth pedestal of the paternal ancestors of  Antiochus [16] I of Commagene can be assigned. Thus he would be the son of  Arsames and the father of Xerxes of Armenia as well as the ruler who committed himself to make tribute payments to  Antiochus [5] III (Pol. 8,25). His reign may fall in the decade before 215 BC. Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) Bibliography M. Schottky, Media Atropatene und Groß-Armenien, 1989 M.-L. Chaumont, in: Gnomon 67, 1995, 330-336.

Abecedarii

(120 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (sc. psalmi or hymni). Songs whose verses or stanzas each begin with a letter of the alphabet in sequence. They are documented in Jewish literature from Jer. 1-4 onwards; Ps 145 is a devotional prayer to this day. In pagan literature they are documented for instance in the late hymns to Dionysus (Anth. Pal. 9,524) or Apollo (Anth. Pal. 9,525) and in magical texts (PGM IV 1363). In Christian literature Augustine's Psalm contra partem Donati (PL 43,25-32) is the best known, composed in 393 or 394 for the ‘entirely uneducated to learn by heart’.  Acrostich. Graf, Fritz (Columb…

Abella

(275 words)

Author(s): Garozzo, Bruno (Pisa)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Villa | Italy, languages Town in  Campania near  Nola on the road from  Capua to  Abellinum (Ἀβέλλα; Abélla, Abellae, Str. 5,4,11; Plin. HN 3,63; Ptol. 3,11; Charisius, gramm. 1,35), modern Avella, founded by settlers from  Chalcis (Just. Epit. 20,1); its mythological name is Moera, its mythological founder Muranus (Serv. Aen. 7,740). During the  Social Wars, A. paid for its loyalty to Rome in 87 BC with pillage by  Nola (Granius Licinianus 35,20,8). A Roman   colonia before 73 BC (Sall. Hist. 3, fr. 97), it became a   municipium

Abellinum

(169 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae Town of the  Hirpini in  Campania, on the border of southern Samnium ( Samnites), close to the modern Cività. A colonia under Sulla, Augustus, and Severus Alexander, it rose to   civitas , tribus Galeria. A. is situated on a terrace on the left bank of the Sabato river, west of Atripalda. Two wall circuits are preserved ( opus quadratum, 3rd cent. BC, opus reticulatum with towers and moats of the Augustan colony), also baths, houses, an amphitheatre south of the town outside the walls; aqueduct to …

Abeona

(82 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Roman ‘special deity’ which according to Varro (ant. rer. div. 116 Cardauns) is mentioned in Christian polemic (Tert. Ad nat. 2,11; Aug. civ. 4,21) together with Adeona, and is derived from abire or adire. According to Varro both are deities of childhood; the etymological derivation probably refers to the first attempts to walk. The problems associated with all   indigitamenta apply to the name. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) Bibliography B. Cardauns, M. Terentius Varro. Antiquitates rerum divinarum II (commentary), 1976, 206.

Ab epistulis

(6 words)

see  Epistulis, ab

Abgar

(191 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
The name of several kings of Osroene in the era from 94 BC to AD 244. Worthy of notice are: [German version] [1] II. Ariamnes bar Abgar (68-53 BC) A. II Ariamnes bar Abgar, reigned 68-53 BC. He was accused by the Romans of having caused the catastrophe of Crassus. Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) [German version] [2] V Ukkāmā (the Black) (4BC to 50 AD) A. V Ukkāmā (the Black), 4 BC - AD 7 and AD 13-50; played a dubious role in the Parthian struggle for the throne between Gotarzes II and Meherdates. Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) [German version] [3] VIII, the Great (77-212 AD) A. VIII, the Great, 177-21…

Abgar Legend

(327 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] The Abgar legend is a pseudepigraphic correspondence between  Jesus of Nazareth and king Abgar V. Ukkāmā (= the Black; Tac. Ann. 12,12,2) of Edessa, who ruled the kingdom of Osroene from 4 BC to AD 50. The oldest version in  Eusebius, who allegedly found the letters in the Edessene archives and translated them from Syriac (H.E. 1,13,6-21). A. supposedly heard of Jesus' healing and invited him to Edessa to be healed by him. In his answer Jesus praised the king as blessed but would …

Abia

(122 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Achaeans, Achaea (Ἀβία; Abía). Coastal town in eastern  Messenia (Plin. HN 4,22; Ptol. 3,14,31), the modern Palaiochora, 6 km south of Kalamata. Its equation with Ἱρή (Hire), one of the seven towns mentioned in Hom. Il. 9,150, is questionable.  Perioikoi-polis of Sparta, from 338 BC controlled by  Messene, with the exception of 183-146 BC, when A. was an independent member of the  Achaean Confederacy (Pol. 23,17); sanctuaries of  Heracles and  Asc…

Abii

(154 words)

Author(s): Tokhtas'ev, Sergej R. (St. Petersburg)
[German version] (Ἄβιοι; Ábioi). According to Hom. Il. 13,5 f. a tribe in northern  Thrace who, with the Glactophagi and Hippemolgi were the justest of mankind. Identical with Aeschylus' Γάβιοι ( Gábioi) ( Prometheus Lyomenos fr. 196,3, TGF 3). In later literature, they became the subject of etymological and idealizing speculations (e.g. FGrH Ephoros 70 fr. 42). Together with the Hippemolgi (as early as Ps.-Hesiod, Katalogos Gynaikon fr. 150,15 f. M.-W.) and Glactophagi (cf. loc. cit. fr. 151), they were identified as  Scythian…

Abila

(244 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pompeius Town (mod. Quwailibeh) 15 km north-west of Irbid (Jordan). The ruins of A. cover an area of c. 1.5 km × 0.5 km, which comprises two hills, Tell A. and Khirbat Umm al-Amad [1. 1 f.] to the south. The settlement, which had been continuously settled from the 3rd millennium BC to the Iron Age, was refounded under the Seleucids. Polybius (5,69-70) noted its conquest by Antiochus III in 218 BC. Its inclusion in the  Decapolis occurred no later than at that time. Remains of a street grid with cardo and decumanus, a theatre and aq…

Abinnaeus Archive

(128 words)

Author(s): Redies, Michael (Berlin)
[German version] Papyrus collection of Flavius Abinnaeus, who was praefectus alae in Dionysia (Egypt) between AD 342 and 351. This collection contains letters, contracts, invoices, and tax and other rolls, which are, at least in part, well-preserved and provide excellent insight into daily life in Egypt in the fourth century. The papyri are collected in Bell [1] (additions in [2; 3] and [4]). Redies, Michael (Berlin) Bibliography 1 H. I. Bell et al., The Abinnaeus Archive, 1962 2 R. Rémondon, Militaires et civils dans une campagne Égyptienne au temps de Constance II,…

Abisares

(184 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Indian prince named after his tribe (the Abhisari), who was allied with  Poros. His territory reached from the southern chain of the Karakorum to Kashmir in the east and Hazera (near Rawalpindi) in the west. He supported the resistance to  Alexander [4] in Swat (Arr. Anab. 4,27,7; 30,7), but then sent him presents at Taxila (loc. cit. 5,8,3; in Curt. 8,13,1 false: homage). He was absent from the battle of the Hydaspes ( Hydaspes) even though it was expected that he would support P…

Abissareans

(56 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] Called Abhisāra in Old Indian, a mountain people of northern Pakistan (Megasthenes at Arr. Ind. 4,12), on the Soanos river, an eastern tributary of the Indus River (nowadays called Sohan or Suwan [1. 1100 f.]), with King  Abisares. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography 1 G. Wirth, O. by Hinüber, (ed. and trans.) Arrian, Der Alexanderzug - Indische Geschichte, 1985.

Abiuratio

(185 words)

Author(s): Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin)
[German version] A lawsuit brought before the praetor concerning credited money or some other res certa could be concluded before the   litis contestatio if the plaintiff made the defendant take an oath on the validity of the claim involved in the suit. The defendant hereupon had the choice of paying or denying the claim; the latter is the abiuratio (Isid. Orig. 5,26,21). If he abjured, the plaintiff's   actio was denied; sometimes instead of this the defendant was granted an exceptio iurisiurandi (Dig. 12,2,9 pr.), if, for instance, the existence and content of the oath gave…

Ablabius

(329 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Degani, Enzo (Bologna) | Schwarcz, Andreas (Vienna)
(Ἀβλάβιος; Ablábios). [German version] [1] Flavius A., 4th cent. AD Flavius A. was one of the most influential officials under  Constantinus the Great. He came from Crete (Lib. Or. 42,23); the child of poor non-Christians (Eun. Vit. Soph. 6,3,1-7); later converted to Christianity (Athan. Epist. Fest. 5). In AD 324/326 he was vicarius of Asia (CIL III 352), 329-337 praef. praet. Orientis, 331 cos. ord. It is said to have been on his instigation that the pagan philosopher  Sopater was executed by Constantine (Eun. Vit. Soph. 6,2,12; 3,7,13; Zos. 2,40,3). He was possibly still in office as pra…

Ablaut

(189 words)

Author(s): Strunk, Klaus (Munich)
[German version] (technical term coined by Jacob Grimm) refers to a system of vowel alterations within inflectional or derivational word and form groups that originates in proto-Indo-Germanic, effected for the most part through early accent alternation. To be distinguished are (1) ‘quantitative Ablaut’ (‘Gradation’) and (2) ‘qualitative Ablaut’ (‘Gradation’). With (1), e alternated (in ‘stressed syllables’) with Ø (in ‘unstressed syllables’) and, if necessary, with ē (in ‘expanded syllables’) as, for example, in the suffix of the Greek vowel πά-τερ, Latin Iu-p(p)i-ter: genit…

Abnoba mons

(154 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Black Forest, German Schwarzwald, mountain region in south-western Germany, possibly including also the low mountain ranges of the Odenwald and Rothaargebirge to the north. In 15 BC,  Tiberius paid a visit there to see the sources of the Danube. From the late Tiberian/early Claudian period (2nd half of the 1st cent. AD), there was a Roman-influenced population on the eastern bank of the upper Rhine region; under the Flavians (2nd half of 1st cent. AD), the wooded mountain area und…

Abodah Zara

(6 words)

see  Rabbinical literature

Abodiacum

(135 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Raeti, Raetia Modern Epfach, district of Landsberg am Lech, Germany (CIL III 2,5780); Roman garrison from just before BC to about AD 50, late antique fortifications along the long, steep-sided, island-like Lorenzberg in a bow of the river Lech. 300 m away, underneath the village of Epfach, there is a Flavian road- vicus on the   via Claudia , north-east of the turn-off to Gauting. Building remains on Epfach hill dating from the 3rd and 4th cents. AD; possibly late antique/early Chri…

Abolitio

(109 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The abolitio, which has come down to us in the Digest title 48,16, is in Roman law discontinuation of criminal proceedings, often with the effect of a pardon (  indulgentia ), but mainly with the possibility of renewing the charge, as with the abolitio publica, ordered by the Senate or in exceptional cases by the emperor, and the abolitio privata, pronounced by the judge at the request of a private prosecutor. The abolitio ex lege, for example, takes effect on the death of the prosecutor. In any event this first appears under the designation abolitio in the imperial period…

Abolla

(209 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] [1] Roman cloak Roman cloak of unknown form; known from literary sources but not identifiable with certainty from monuments. In contradistinction to the  toga, the abolla is the costume of the farmer and the soldier (Non. 538,16), and to satirists it is the cloak favoured by philosophers of the Cynic and Stoic schools (Mart. 4,53; Juv. 3,115). The abolla was evidently similar to the   chlamys , both in form and in the way it was worn (Serv. Verg. Aen. 5,421). Abolla is possibly a general term for the shoulder-cloak (cf. Juv. 4,76, mentioned as the cloak of the praefectus urbi). …

Abolus

(41 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Ἄβολος; Ábolos). Torrent by  Catana, near which Timoleon defeated Mamercus (prior to 338 BC; Plut. Timoleon 34,1).  Sicily Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography E. Manni, Geogr. fisica e politica della Sicilia antica (Cocalus Suppl. 4), 1981, 93.

Abonutichus

(211 words)

Author(s): Marek, Christian (Zürich)
[German version] (Ἀβώνου τεῖχος; Abṓnou teîchos). Coastal town in  Paphlagonia, east of the foothills of Carambis (Ptol. 5,4,2). The etymology of its name (cf. Gordiou Teichos, Panemou Teichos) lies as much in the dark as the beginnings of its existence as an urban settlement; recorded it as a  polis from Trajan onwards (beginning of 2nd cent. AD). Initially part of the province of Pontus, A. was apparently transferred by Marcus Aurelius to the province of  Galatia. It gained particular notoriety through  Lucianus' pamphl…

Aborigines

(286 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] In Roman tradition the name given to the earliest inhabitants of  Latium (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,10; Lydus, Mag. 1,10). The etymology of the name is uncertain: Lycoph. 1253 hints at a derivation from Βορείγονοι ( Boreígonoi;  Aeneas [1] was prophesied that he would settle ἐν τόποις Βορειγόνων; en tópois Boreigónōn); others -- on the presumption that the A. pursued a nomadic way of life -- formulate an onomastic development from Aberrigenes ( aberrare) to A. (Paul. Fest. 19; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,10; Auctor de origine gentis Romanae 4,2). The origin of the A. is equa…

Abortifacients

(173 words)

Author(s): King, Helen (Reading)
[German version] Traditional botany and modern laboratory research agree that many substances in the ancient medicine chest possessed potentially abortive effects. Among these number ruewort ( Ruta graveolens), birthwort ( Aristolochia), pennyroyal ( Mentha pulegium), pomegranate ( Punica granatum), wild carrot ( Daucus carota) and juniper ( Juniperus). However, it is still not easy to make a comparison between modern botanical chemistry and ancient medicine; the portion of ethereal oil and, therefore, the effect of the plants each varied ac…

Abortio

(196 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] also partus abactio, is  abortion in late Roman law. For a long time abortion in Rome was apparently not punishable, any more than it was in Greek law (  amblosis ). This was consistent with a legal system which even allowed abandonment of children. It is possible, though, that the censor made sure there was effective social control with regard to evident abuses. Not until a rescript of Sept. Severus and Caracalla (cf. Marcianus Dig. 47,11,4) was exile imposed on married and divorced women w…

Abortion

(1,070 words)

Author(s): King, Helen (Reading)
[German version] A. Corpus Hippocraticum Abortion is a procedure which was performed frequently in antiquity. However, the Hippocratic Oath forbids the use of a pessary. This text, which had great influence on the later history of medicine, is extremely controversial, whereby the aforementioned clause is the most discussed. In the version which has been handed down to us, neither surgical nor oral abortion methods are excluded. The famous passage in Nat. pueri 13 [1], in which a prostitute is encour…

Aboulites

(62 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Satrap of  Susa under  Darius, father of  Oxathres. In 331 BC he handed the city over to  Alexander [4] with 50,000 silver  talents and was confirmed as satrap. The subdued  Uxii were subordinated to him. During the cleansing after Alexander's losses in  Gedrosia (324), A. and his son were executed. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve 2, no. 5.

Abradatas

(73 words)

Author(s): Kuhrt, Amélie (London) | Sancisi-Weerdenburg, Helen (Utrecht)
[German version] (Ἀβραδάτης; Abradátēs). Fictitious king of Susa, protagonist in a novella in Xen. Cyr. (5,1,2; 6,1,45-52; 6,3,35-36; 6,4,2-10; 7,1,29-32; 7,3,2-14). His beautiful wife, Pantheia, was taken prisoner by Cyrus, treated very well and convinced A. to join Cyrus. A. fell in the battle against the Lydians. Pantheia committed suicide on his grave. Kuhrt, Amélie (London) Sancisi-Weerdenburg, Helen (Utrecht) Bibliography C. J. Brunner, s. v. A., Enclr 1, 228 D. Gera, Xenophon's Cyropaedia, 1993, 221-245.

Abraham

(625 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) | Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] [1] Biblical figure The biblical A. figure is subject to various interpretations during the early Jewish and rabbinical periods. To traditionally devout circles, A. represents the law-abiding patriarch, who, owing to the timeless nature of Jewish law, was able to observe the Halachic commandments previous to their revelation on Sinai (cf. i.a. Sir 44,19; Jub 15,1; 16,21; 21,5; syrBar 57,2; mQid 4,14; bYom 28b). As A. destroyed his father's graven images, he is regarded as the first r…

Abrax­as

(358 words)

Author(s): Harrauer, Christine (Vienna)
[German version] (Ἀβρασάξ, Ἀβράξας, Latin Abraxas). Magical power, created by speculation using number mysticism (seven letters, numerical value: 365) probably associated with Egyptizing Gnosis. Etymologically unsolved, usually assigned to Hebrew arba(s) [1]; possibly in connection with forming of phrases such as Abra(cad)abra [2. 67 f.]. Documented as from the 2nd cent. BC. According to Irenaeus (Adv. Haer. 1,24,7) and Hippolytus (haer. 7,26,6; cf. Ps.Tert. Adv. Haer. 1,5) the Gnostic Basileides saw in Abraxas the all-encom…

Abrettene

(79 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Ἀβρεττηνή; Abrettēnḗ). Region in northern  Mysia, north of Abbaitis and south of Olympene (Plin. HN 5,123; Str. 12,8,9; 11). At the time of the 2nd Triumvirate (43-36/32 BC) Cleon, a leader of the many local bands of brigands, dominated the region. Confirmed in his leadership by the future  Augustus in about 30 BC, he was also a priest of  Zeus Abrettenus [1. 154]. Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography 1 E. Schwertheim, Die Inschr. von Hadrianoi und Hadrianeia (IK 33), 1987.

Abritus

(178 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Thraci, Thracia | (Ἄβριττος; Ábrittos). Roman fortress and civilian settlement, 2 km east of the modern Razgrad, Bulgaria; pre-Roman Thracian settlement, probably the administrative centre of the strategia Rysiké under the last of the Thracian kings (IGBulg 743). From 45 BC part of  Moesia inferior; from no later than AD 78 encampment of auxilia (CIL XVI 22); in the 2nd cent. AD garrison of the cohors II Lucensium (CIL III 13727); strongly fortified in the 4th cent. AD. Inscriptions confirm a civilian settleme…

Abrocomas

(137 words)

Author(s): Kuhrt, Amélie (London) | Sancisi-Weerdenburg, Helen (Utrecht)
(Ἀβροκόμης, Ἀβροκόμας; Abrokómēs, Abrokómas). [German version] [1] Son of Darius I and Phratagune Son of Darius I and Phratagune, fell during the battle of Thermopylae (Hdt. 7,224) [1]. Kuhrt, Amélie (London) Sancisi-Weerdenburg, Helen (Utrecht) [German version] [2] Persian General Persian general at the time of Artaxerxes II, 401 BC, commissioned to lead the war against the Egyptians; questionable whether he was satrap of Syria (Xen. An. 1,3,20; Diod. Sic. 14,20,5). Hurried to support Artaxerxes in the battle of Cunaxa, but he arriv…

Abrogatio

(306 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] In public law, abrogatio refers to the suspension of a right or law. 1a: the complete suspension of a law (  lex ) passed by   rogatio by the assembly (Ulp., prooem. 3: abrogatur legi, cum prorsus tollitur). 1b: in a broader sense also the obsoletion of a paragraph of law due to persistent non-observance (Dig. 1,3,32,1: receptum est, ut leges etiam tacito consensu omnium per desuetudinem abrogentur). 2a: the taking away of an   imperium transferred by the comitia via a rogatio. 2b: in a broader sense the denial of rights by a competent court (Cod. Theod. 9,10,3). The abrogatio i…

Abrote

(49 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (Ἀβρώτη; Abrṓtē). According to Plut. Mor. 295a, the canny wife of  Ninus, the king of Megara. In her memory, he is supposed to have introduced her official dress ἀφάβρωμα ( aphábrōma) to the Megarean women; its abolition was supposedly forbidden by an oracle. Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)

Abrotonon

(47 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] Traditionally, A. is given among others as the name of the mother of  Themistocles (Plut. Themistocles 1, cf. Ath. 13,576). Her Thracian origins were supposedly the reason that Themistocles was not a full citizen.  Themistocles Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne) Bibliography F. J. Frost, Plutarch's Themistocles, 1980, 61-63.

Abroupolis

(109 words)

Author(s): Peter, Ulrike (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἀβρούπολις; Abroupolis). Dynast of the Thracian Sapaioi east of the Nestus and north of Abdera; crossed the Macedonian border as far as Amphipolis in 179 BC, captured mines in Pangaeum, was repelled by  Perseus and driven from his country. The Roman request, in 172, for the restoration of its socius et amicus served as a pretence for the third Macedonian War (Syll.3 643; Pol. 22,18,2-3; Diod. Sic. 29,33; Liv. 42,13,5; 40,5; 41,10-11; App. Mac. 11; Paus. 7,10,6). Thracian name form Ἀβλουπορις ( Ablouporis) known from two inscriptions from 80 BC (Sherk, no. 20; …

Abrus

(130 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Arabic (orig. Indian) name for the coral-red, poisonous seeds of the legume Abrus precatorius L. that have been used in India since antiquity in medicine, criminal science and as weights as ‘rati’ like those of Ceratonia (karat; seed of the carob tree), but which were probably not brought to Europe until after 1550 (according to Prosper Alpinus, 1553-1617, in 1592), in [1] pisa rubra, in [2. 343] pisum indicum minus coccineum, called ‘semen Jequiritii’ or ‘rosary peas’ by other botanists, especially common for rosaries like the stones of the oleaster.  Weights Hünemörd…

Absentia

(469 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Absence of persons or lack of facts with significant public or civil legal consequences: 1. Absence of a civis Romanus on the   census date, when personal presence is required (Vell. Pat. 2,7,7; exceptions: Gell. NA 5,19,16). Inexcused absentia can cause disadvantageous estimation of assets and class assignment (Cic. Att. 1,18,8), and can also bring sanctions as harsh as the forced sale of assets (Zon. 7,19). 2: The absentia of a candidate for public office during registration as a candidate and also during candidacy. Candidacy assumes personal re…

Absolutio

(227 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] in Roman court proceedings is the opposite of ‘condemnation’ (  condemnatio ). In civil proceedings the formula in which the praetors set down the programme for the iudex ends stereotypically with the judicial command ... condemnato. Si non paret, absolvito. Both absolutio and condemnatio were final and absolute, in other words the decision -- apart from the special case of   appellatio -- was irrevocable, the dispute was definitively concluded and the exceptio rei iudicatae (demurrer of legal force) stood in the way of a new action. The saying omnia iudicia absolutor…

Abstentio

(134 words)

Author(s): Manthe, Ulrich (Passau)
[German version] According to Roman law sui heredes acquired the inheritance due to them on succession; if a suus had not yet outwardly shown that he wanted to keep the inheritance, the praetor permitted him to abstain from it ( se abstinere). In this case the suus was still the heres, but did not receive the inheritance and was not responsible for the debts of the estate; the next in line received the bonorum possessio. An extraneus did not need an abstentio; as he did not acquire the inheritance until he came into it, he could simply relinquish it, but also declare a disclaimer ( omittere). …

Abstractum

(4 words)

see  Morphology

Absyrtus

(5 words)

see  Apsyrtus [1]

Abthugni

(82 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (pun. p[t]bgn?). Town in Africa Byzacena, the modern Henchir es-Souar; for the tradition of the place name [1]. The   fossa regia ran close to A. (CIL VIII Suppl. 4, 23084). Under  Hadrian, Abthugni became a   municipium (CIL VIII Suppl. 1, 11206; Suppl. 4, 23085). Further inscriptions: AE 1991, 461 f., no. 1641-1644. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 J. Schmidt, s. v. Aptugni, RE 2, 288. AATun 050, sheet 42, no. 52 C. Lepelley, Les cités de l'Afrique romaine au Bas-Empire, 2, 1981, 265-277.

Abu Bakr

(81 words)

Author(s): Schönig, Hanne (Halle/Saale)
[German version] (Abū Bakr). First of the four righteous caliphs (AD 632-34), i. e. the first successor of  Muhammad. As one of the latter's first followers and close advisor, A. became caliph after his death though not without opposition ( Ali). After subduing the apostasy movement he is credited with the initial consolidation of the young Islamic community and laid the foundation for its rapid initial expansion.   Caliph Schönig, Hanne (Halle/Saale) Bibliography W. M. Watt, Abū Bakr, in: EI2 I, 109b-111a.

Abudius Ruso

(49 words)

Author(s): Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting)
[German version] Former aedile and legionary legate under Cornelius Lentulus Gaetulicus in Upper Germany. A. accused him, because he had designated the son of L.  Aelius [II 19] Seianus as his son-in-law, but he was then banned himself (Tac. Ann. 6,30,2). PIR2 A. 17. Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting)

Aburius

(90 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] [1] C., Roman envoy (171 BC) C., envoy to King Masinissa and the Carthaginians 171 BC; his offspring was possibly the mint master C. Aburius Geminus 134 (MRR 1, 418; RRC 276). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] Tribunus plebis (187 BC) M., attempted as tribunus plebis in 187 BC to prevent the triumph of M. Fulvius Nobilior (Liv. 39,4-6); Praetor inter peregrinos 176 (Liv. 41,14; 15). His offspring was possibly the mint master M. Aburius Geminus 132 (MRR 2,369; 400; RRC 280). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)

Aburnius

(89 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] Caedicianus, Q. (2nd cent. AD.) A. Caedicianus, Q., legatus Augusti, probably to a legion in Dacia under Trajan (CIL III 1089); became suffect consul together with C. Bruttius Praesens under Hadrian in AD 118 or 119; owner of the figlinae furianae and tempesinae between AD 123 and 140 (CIL XV 227-230; 603-605; 607-608). He was mentioned by Marcus Aurelius, εἰς ἑαυτόν 4,50 (FPD, 213 f.; PIR A 21). Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] A. Valens, see  Fulvius. A. Valens, see  Fulvius. Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Abū Simbel

(252 words)

Author(s): Seidlmayer, Stephan Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] A location on the west bank of the Nile valley in Nubia, c. 250 km south of Aswān, where Ramses II had two temples hewn out of rock cliffs [1]. The great temple in the south is dedicated to the holy triad of Amun, Ptah and Re-Harakhte, and to the Pharaoh himself. Its pylon-shaped stone facade is dominated by four 20-metre statues of the throned Pharaoh. Inside, two halls with massive square pillars and a transverse hall lead to the inner sanctuary; the temple axis is oriented in such a way th…

Abusina

(146 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Modern Eining. Tab. Peut. 4,3 f. Arusena, the modern river Abens. From AD 79/81 cohort fort ( castellum; 1.8 hectares) at the crossing of the Danube. Reduced size fort from about AD 300; the   vicus of the middle imperial period relocated into the fort: its northern extension perhaps a horreum from the second half of the 4th cent. AD. In the field named ‘Unterfeld’ remains of an ephemeral camp ( legio III Italica) from about AD 172/179.  Horrea;  Cohors;  Castellum Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography A. Faber, Die südgallische Terra Sigilata aus Kastell und …

Abydenus

(77 words)

Author(s): Oelsner, Joachim (Leipzig)
[German version] (Ἀβυδηνός; Abydēnós). Author of a ‘History of the  Chaldaeans’ (Euseb. Praep. evang. 9,41,1: περὶ Ἀσσυρίων; perì Assyríōn) that was used by Eusebius and others (partly available in Armenian only). The (lost) work was primarily based on excerpts from Alexander Polyhistor which in turn can be traced back to Berossus. Nothing is known about his life; his Ionizing dialect places him in the 2nd century AD (FGrH 3 C no. 680). Oelsner, Joachim (Leipzig)

Abydus

(516 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Seidlmayer, Stephan Johannes (Berlin)
(Ἄβυδος; Ábydos). [German version] [1] City at the narrowest part of the Dardanelles This item can be found on the following maps: Colonization | Peloponnesian War | Pergamum | Persian Wars | Delian League | Education / Culture  Miletus founded A. as a polis in the 1st half of the 7th cent. BC, by permission of the Lydian king  Gyges (Str. 13,1,22). It is situated at the narrowest part of the Dardanelles, on the Asian shore, 5 km east of Çanakkale on the promontory of Cape Nagara and already known to Homer (Il.…

Acacia

(187 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (ἀκακία [ akakía], Dioscorides 1,133; ἄκανθα [ ákantha], Theophr. Hist. pl. 6,1,3). The Egyptian shittah or rubber tree, already mentioned in Hdt. 2,96, belongs to the genus of mimosa plants widespread in the Mediterranean. The sap ( kommì, gum) secreted by the tree was used by the Egyptians for embalming corpses (Hdt. 2,86), but then also in human medical applications (ophthalmology) and was traded at high prices in Roman times (Plin. HN 13,63). The acacia sap was processed into mouth pastilles (Plin. HN 24,109) for…

Acacius

(589 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
(Ἀκάκιος; Akákios). [German version] [1] Rhetorician and poet from Caesarea Rhetorician and poet from Caesarea, contemporary of  Libanius, who mentions A. numerous times in his letters, also known through Eunapius (Vitae Sophist. 497, cf. PLRE s. v. Acacius 6-8). After completing his studies in Athens, A. taught in Antioch [1]. He is said to have been superior to Libanius because of his natural talent. A. may have authored Ὠκύπους (Lib. Ep. 1380 W. = 1301 f.), the parody of a tragedy that was passed down …

Academus

(132 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Ἀκάδημος). Attic hero, who was venerated in the grove  ‘Akademeia’, 1.6 km west of Athenian Dipylon (a cultic building is presumed). Hecademus is probably an older form of the name (a vase inscription reads hεκα[δεμος] Beazley, ABV 27,36). He revealed to Castor and Polydeuces that Theseus was holding their sister Helena, abducted from Sparta, in Aphidna (Plut. Theseus 32,3-5), and founded the gymnasium (Hesych. s. v. akadḗmia). In gratitude the Spartans spared the academy during their invasions of Attica. The myth competes with another, in whic…

Academy

(2,433 words)

Author(s): Szlezák, Thomas A. (Tübingen)
(Ἀκαδήμεια, Ἀκαδημία; Akadḗmeia, Akadēmía). School for philosophers in Athens, founded by Plato and maintained continuously over three (according to others: nine) centuries. Here, our emphasis will be on the Academy as an institution. Dogmatic aspects will be discussed in the entries on individual philosophers and those on  Middle Platonism and  Neoplatonism. [German version] I. Plato's School Plato began teaching philosophy around 387/6 BC after returning from his trip to Sicily and southern Italy, where he had met with the Pythagoreans associated w…

Academy

(7,934 words)

Author(s): Rebenich, Stefan (Mannheim RWG) | Frobenius, Wolf (Saarbrücken RWG) | Barth, Andreas (Tübingen RWG)
I. General (CT) [German version] A. Definition (CT) The word ‘academy’ is not used in a uniform manner. In addition to scholarly academies dedicated to research, the term denotes various scholarly, pedagogical and social establishments. There are medical academies; music, dance and art academies; as well as church-related ones ( A. II. musical). Scholarly (i.e. research) academies, on the other hand, are associations of scholars with the purpose of furthering research and academic communication. Their names have been changed many times over the centuries: they have been known as soc…

Acadra

(73 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Coastal area of Indo-China A coastal area of Indo-China mentioned by Ptol. 7,2,6. Excavations in Arikamedu indicate that this region enjoyed trade with Rome during the 1st cent. AD. Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) [German version] [2] City of southern China City of southern China recorded only by Ptol. 7,3,5, possibly associated with the πόλις Ἀσπίθρα ( pólis Aspíthra) and the Psitharas river mentioned by Plin. HN 6,35. Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin)

Acamantis

(130 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Ἀκαμαντίς; Akamantís). Since the reforms of the phyles by  Cleisthenes, fifth of the ten Attic phyles (IG II/III2 1700 ff.); eponymous hero  Acamas. In the 4th cent. BC, it comprised five   asty , three   paralia and five   mesogeia demes. In 308/7 BC, three of them changed over to the Macedonian phyles of Antigonis and  Demetrias; following their dissolution in 201/200 BC, they rejoined A.  Prospalta changed over to the  Ptolemais in 224/3 BC,  Hagnus to the  Attalis in 201/0 BC, Eitea to the  Hadr…

Acamas

(291 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford)
[German version] (Ἀκάμας; Akámas). Son of Theseus, normally closely connected to his brother  Demophon. A similar history is assigned to both brothers. Their mother appears in different forms: Phaedra (Diod. Sic. 4,62; Apollod. epit. 1,18), Ariadne (schol. Od. 11,321) or Antiope (Pind. fr. 175). Although they are not found in the Iliad, according to the Ilioupersis (fr. 6 PEG) they are present in Troy and during the plundering of the city they free their grandmother Aethra from prison. In various sources both brothers are named as lovers of Priam's …
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