Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Basilinna

(178 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (βασιλίννα; basilínna, ‘queen’) is the designation for the wife of the Athenian  Archon Basileus (‘king’) who is considered to be the democratic successor in the sacred duties of the king (Aristot. Ath. Pol. 3 on the origin; 57 on the duties). She must be a citizen of Athens and a virgin at the time of marriage. Her sacred duties include secret rites in the Dionysus cult, particularly at the Anthesteria, which she conducts with the gera(i)rai (‘aged women’ or ‘venerable women’). In the context of these rites, she is given to  Dionysus as wife. More impor…

Basiliscus

(178 words)

Author(s): Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
[German version] (Βασιλίσκος; Basilískos), Flavius. East Roman counter-emperor, brother of the empress Verina who was the wife of emperor  Leo I (457-474). Since 468, he held the office of mag. militum. In 468, he fought unsuccessfully against the Vandals, in 471, he supported Leo in overthrowing and murdering Aspar ( Ardabur), the powerful mag. militum, and revolted against Leo's son-in-law  Zeno (474-491) from January 475 until August 476 with the support of Monophysite groups. During his rule, he issued an edict to abolish the doctrines establi…

Basilisk

(219 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Greek Βασιλίσκος; Basilískos), ‘the king of the snakes’, fabulous snake of the Libyan desert, documented from Hellenistic times; detailed descriptions are given by Pliny (HN 8,78f.) and Isidore (12,4,6f.). Recognizable by a white spot on its head, ‘like a diadem’ (Pliny) and by its unsnakelike form of forward motion, the B. kills by its breath and smell: wherever it passes, it burns bushes and grass and breaks stones (Plin.). It can kill humans also by its mere gaze (Plin. HN 29,66…

Basilius

(1,337 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich) | Et al.
(Βασιλεῖος; Basileîos). [German version] [1] Basil the Great Theologian and bishop of Caesarea/Cappadocia. Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) [German version] A. Biography B. (born around 329/330 as the son of a Christian senatorial family who owned large estates) together with his younger brother  Gregorius of Nyssa and his friend  Gregorius of Nazianze were called the three great Cappadocians. His grandmother gave him his first introduction to the Bible and theology along the lines of Origenism. His education contin…

Basle

(4 words)

see  Basilia

Basle, Antikenmuseum and Ludwig Collection

(1,128 words)

Author(s): Kreikenbom, Detlev (Mainz RWG)
Kreikenbom, Detlev (Mainz RWG) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) Although the Basle Antikenmuseum was founded only a few decades ago, making it one of the youngest of its kind in Europe, it houses an archaeological collection of great significance. Various genres of visual art are represented by excellent examples both in terms of their significance for cultural history as well as quality. The museum was founded - and continues to be supported - through a joint effort of municipal and private sponsor…

Basque

(143 words)

Author(s): Schwerteck, Hans (Tübingen)
[German version] Basque is not genetically related with any other language. It is close to Iberian in its phonology, but otherwise has few lexical and morphological similarities to it. Essentially, it has created its own forms. However, its vocabulary shows strong exterior influences. The oldest layers include words from the Alps, the Caucasus, and Northern Africa, as well as Indo-European and Celtic imports. The main body of loan words stems from Latin, such as gurutze ‘cross’, lege ‘law’, errota ‘mill’, kale ‘street’, ahate ‘duck’, pago ‘beech’. Additionally, we find Romanism…

Baṣra

(295 words)

Author(s): Toral-Niehoff, Isabel (Freiburg)
[German version] (Τερηδών/ Terēdṓn, Ptol. 5,19,5; Ἰρίδωτις/ Irídōtis or Διρίδωτις/ Dirídōtis, Arr. Ind. 41,6). Arabian city in lower Mesopotamia, 420 km south-east of Baghdad on the Šaṭṭ al-Arab (combined course of the Euphrates [2] and Tigris shortly before their mouth). Although B. lies at the site of the Persian settlement of Vahištābāḏ Ardašer (preceded perhaps by ancient Diridotis/Iridotis or Teredon), it is essentially a new foundation originating during the period of the Arab conquest (AD 635), an…

Bassae

(4 words)

see  Phigalia

Bassaeus Rufus, M.

(94 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Of low descent, lacking the usual education (Cass. Dio 71,5,2f.). In the army, he advanced to the office of primus pilus, held procuratorial positions in Spain, Noricum, and Gallia/Germania, and became a rationibus, praef. vigilum, praef. Aegypti in 168/169 [1. 297], praef. praetorio from 169 to before AD 180. He was honoured with the ornamenta consularia and, after his death, with three statues in Rome (CIL VI 1599=ILS 1326 [2. 389-393]). Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 G. Bastianini, Lista dei Prefetti d'Egitto dal 30a al 299p, in: ZPE 17, 1975 2 Pflaum, 1.

Bassarai, Bassareus

(5 words)

see  Dionysus

Bassiana(e)

(175 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] [1] City in Pannonia superior This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Pannonia City in Pannonia superior (It. Ant. 262,10), 18 miles from Savaria on the road to Arrabona and  Brigetio, near Sárvár on the middle section of the river Raab.   Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana) [German version] [2] Roman city of  Pannonia inferior Roman city of  Pannonia inferior, near today's Petrovci and Putinci in eastern Srem on the road from Sirmium to Taurunum, in the region of the Scordisci and the pre-Celtic Amantini (CIL III 3224; Ptol.…

Bassianus

(184 words)

Author(s): Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) | Bleckmann, Bruno (Strasbourg) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Originally the cognomen of  Caracalla Originally the cognomen of  Caracalla. Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) [German version] [2] Originally the cognomen of the future emperor M. Aurelius  Severus Alexander Originally the cognomen of the future emperor M. Aurelius  Severus Alexander. Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) [German version] [3] Caesar for Italy around 316 AD Married to  Anastasia [1], named Caesar for Italy by  Constantinus the Great shortly before the war against Licinus (AD 316), but was then spurred on by his brother Senecio to…

Bassus

(181 words)

Author(s): Richmond, John A. (Blackrock, VA) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] Friend of Ovid Among his best friends, Ovid mentions  Propertius,  Ponticus, and Bassus quoque clarus iambis (Ov. Tr. 4,10,45-47). This B. could therefore likely be the addressee of Prop. 1,4,1 and perhaps Horace's friend (Carm. 1,36,14). No fragments exist whatsoever. It cannot be determined whether the iambographer is also identical with  Iulius B., the rhetor mentioned by the older Seneca, who consectari ... solebat res sordidas (Contr. 10,1,13). Richmond, John A. (Blackrock, VA) Bibliography H. Bardon, 2, 52. [German version] [2] Military aid to praef…

Bassus Lollius

(112 words)

Author(s): Degani, Enzo (Bologna)
[German version] Epigram poet in the early 1st cent. AD (cf. Anth. Pal. 7,391 on the death of Germanicus in AD 19), born perhaps in Smyrna (according to the lemma of Anth. Pal. 11,72; the poem's authorship is, however, not certain). At least nine poems by B. are extant from the ‘Garland’ of Philippus (with the addition of several incerta, cf. Anth. Pal. 9,30 as well), all of which rather mediocre, most of them either epideictic (9,236 is a panegyrical poem about imperial Rome, ‘the home of the entire universe’) or funeral epigrams (7,372 = GVI 1580 is possibly an actual inscription). Degani, Enz…

Bast

(5 words)

see  Writing utensils

Bastarda

(590 words)

Author(s): Zamponi, Stefano (Pistoia)
[German version] In addition to the litterae textuales, the cursive scripts, and chancellery scripts, a third modus scribendi emerged between the end of the 13th cent. and the first few decades of the 14th cent. Late medieval and Renaissance sources referred to it by the names of littera bastarda, lettre bastarde, textus bastardus, b. Bastarda designates a type of writing which combines the two graphic traditions of the 13th cent.: cursive, as far as the forms of letters and their joining in a system of writing is concerned, and the tradition of littera textualis in what concerns writin…

Bastarnae, Basternae

(289 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Tokhtas'ev, Sergej R. (St. Petersburg)
[German version] Germanic tribal group (Plin. HN 4,81; Str. 7,3,17) originally from the upper Vistula (face urns). Since c. 233 BC, they have been found in the area between Olbia and the Danube delta (IOSPE 12 32; Pomp. Trog. 28). In the period before the change from BC to AD, the B. were one of the largest south-east Germanic tribes. The B. who settled in the Carpathian Basin until late antiquity were known under the name of Peucini. In 182 BC, Philip V required the B. to move into the area of the Dardani. In 179, they attacked …

Bastet

(193 words)

Author(s): von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin)
[German version] (Egyptian Bst.t). Chief goddess of  Bubastis, represented as a cat or a cat-headed woman. B. is syncretistically associated with  Sachmet,  Hathor,  Isis and similar goddesses [1. 11-69]. In the   interpretatio [2] graeca she is seen as  Artemis (e.g. Hdt. 2,137), infrequently also as  Aphrodite (e.g. Pistis Sophia 139-140, [5]). B. can be understood as a more benign aspect of Sachmet, but she herself may be said to be mistress of a particular class of demon. In this capacity, she is assigned the lion god Maih…

Bastetani, Bastuli

(103 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] The name of this tribe from southern Spain is probably derived from the city of Basti (today's Baza), which must be its principal location (Ptol. 2,6,13; 60). After his conquest of Carthago Nova in AD 207, P.  Scipio sent his brother L. to the B., where the latter defeated the Carthaginian  Mago (Liv. 28,1f.; Zon. 9,8,8). On the role of the B. in the revolt of  Viriatus, cf. App. Ib. 66. There is evidence for Bastetania still for the time of the West Goths, when Leovigild fought the Byzantines there (Chron. min. 2,212,3). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Tovar 3,26f.
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