Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Bactrus

(132 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin)
(Βάκτρος; Báktros). [German version] [1] Inhabitant of the city of Bactra or of the land  Bactria Inhabitant of the city of Bactra or of the land  Bactria (usually ὁ Βάκτριος and Βακτριανός), see Dionys. Per. 736 (GGM II p. 150), Nonnus, Dion. 25,374, Str. 11,11,3 Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) Treidler, Hans (Berlin) [German version] [2] Southerly tributary of the Oxus Southerly tributary of the Oxus (Āmū-daryā), today Balḫāb (Curt. 7,4,31; Plin. HN 6,48; Str. 11,11,2 i.a.); identical with the  Araxes, according to Aristot. Mete. 1,13,16 and Ps.-Plut. De …

Baculum

(4 words)

see  Staff

Bacurius

(124 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin)
[German version] Prince (according to Rufin. Hist. 1,10: King) of the Iberi to the north of Armenia. He entered into office in the service of the Romans as a protector possibly as early as 378-369 and fought as the tribunus of one of the two scholae palatinae at Adrianopolis (Amm. Marc. 31,12,16). B. became dux Palaestinae and later (around 391/2) comes domesticorum to  Theodosius I. He took part in the battle on the Frigidus (as magister utriusque militiae? Rufin. Hist. 2,33; according to Zos. 4,57,3; 58,3, he fell in the battle). B. was a Christian (Rufin. Hist. 1,10)…

Badger

(196 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] A predator of the marten family ( Mustelidae), called meles ( maeles, Varro, Rust. 3,12,3; melo, Isid. Orig. 12,2,40) by the Romans; it was nocturnal and probably unknown to the Greeks [1]. Pliny maintains wrongly (HN 8,138) that it could defend itself against humans and dogs by puffing itself up, and otherwise only mentions it in comparison with other animals. Without taking into consideration the notes of the physician Marcellus Empiricus (36,5) who under the name of adeps taxoninus (which was Celtic) according to Isidore, Orig. 20,2,24, with a quotation …

Bad Nauheim

(149 words)

Author(s): Pingel, Volker (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Celts Located in the Wetterau region, the town is rich in saltwater springs that were exploited already in the late Celtic period (1st cent. BC) as saltworks with remnants of briquetage (grading basins, ovens, clay barrels, forming vessels). There are still traces of settlements in the city area such as a fortification of a section on the Johannisberg, a large field of cremation graves, and a hoard of Celtic coins that all bear witness to the to…

Baebia

(44 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] B. Galla, wife of procurator Q. Licinius Silvanus Granianus, flaminica in Hispania Tarraconensis (AE 1929, 232 = RIT 321); mother of a consular by the same name who served in the year 106 (see PIR2 L 247). Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Baebius

(1,433 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Plebeian gentile name (Schulze 133; ThlL 2,1674f.). The family played an eminent role since the 2nd Punic War but did not achieve a lasting position in the top ranks of Roman nobility during the Republic. The most important family is that of the Tamp(h)ili. The Baebii produced several officials in imperial times. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] B. (Tamphilus), M. Tribunus plebis 103 BC (?), as tribune of the people, he offered resistance against the lex agraria of L.  Appuleius Saturninus in 103 BC (Vir. ill. 73,1). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [I 2] B. Deleg…

Baecula

(73 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Punic Wars Settlement in the mining area on the upper  Baetis (modern Bailen). In 208 BC, it was the location of one of the decisive battles of the Second Punic War, in which Hasdrubal was defeated by P.C. Scipio Africanus. Hasdrubal subsequently departed from Spain (Pol. 10,38,7; 11,20,5; Liv. 27,18,1; 28,13,5; App. Ib. 24). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Tovar 3, 153-154.

Baetasii

(57 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] A people in Lower Germania, whose tribal area, attributed to the colonia Ulpia Traiana/Xanten, most likely lay between Erkelenz and Krefeld. The B. participated with one contingent in the revolt of  Julius Civilis (Plin. HN 4,106; Tac. Hist. 4,56,3; 66,1). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography TIR M 31,39 C. B. Rüger, Germania Inferior, 1968, esp. 98f.

Baeterrae

(136 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | Coloniae | Gallia/Gaul Oppidum of the  Volcae Arecomici in Gallia Narbonensis, modern Béziers (Hérault), settled at the latest from 750/650 BC. Since Caesar's time, Colonia Urbs Iulia Septimanorum Baeterrae with veterans of the legio VII (Plin. HN 3,36; Mela 2,75; Str. 4,1,6; Ptol. 2,10,6). B. was the centre of an important road network, and controlled a large and prosperous surrounding area, favoured by the nearby ports of Agatha and Narbo. Its destruction in the …

Baetis

(113 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Modern river Guadalquivir. Its ancient course was the same as today, but originally, its delta had four branches (Avien. 288ff.), and two in the Augustan period (Str. 3,1,9; 2,11); nowadays, it discharges into the Atlantic from a single course; the silted branches of the delta can still be detected. Its high water levels seem to have remained unchanged: large seagoing vessels sailed upriver to Hispalis, small ones to Ilipa, and river barges to Corduba (Str. 3,2,3). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography A. Casal, El Guadalquivir, 1975 A. Ruiz Rodriguez, M. Molinos…

Baetulo

(37 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] River (modern Besos) and municipium (modern Badalona) of the  Lacetani on the eastern coast of Spain (Mela 2,90; Plin. HN 3,22; Ptol. 2,6,19; CIL II 4606-4608; 4611). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Schulten 1, 1974, 305.

Bagacum

(319 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Limes Modern Bavai, capital ( civitas) of the  Nervii, in the French Département Nord not far off the Belgian border. The Celtic place name as well as some scanty finds from the Latène period hint at the possibility that a modest pre-Roman settlement existed. However, B. is a Roman foundation, and has to be seen in the context of Agrippa's road building programme for the reorganization of Gaul (20/19 BC). At this junction of the links with Durocort…

Bagae

(159 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] City in  Numidia, located between the Aurès mountains to the south and the salt lake Garaat al-Tarf to the north, called Ksar Baghai today, originally perhaps a local castellum. There is evidence for a council of decuriones in the year AD 162 (CIL VIII 1, 2275). A diocesan town in 256, it became one of the most important centres of  Donatism in late antiquity [1. 284, 304, 719-723]. For example in the year 394, 310 Donatist bishops assembled in B. (Aug. Epist. Parmeniani 3,4,21; c. Cresconium grammaticum 3f.). B. wa…

Bagaios

(4 words)

see  Zeus

Bagaudae

(333 words)

Author(s): Krause, Jens-Uwe (Munich)
[German version] The B. were rebellious residents of rural Gallia and Spain (3rd to 5th cents. AD). The first appearance of B. (under their leaders Aelianus and Amandus) is documented for the time around AD 285/6. In 286,  Maximianus became joint ruler with  Diocletianus under orders to defeat the B. (Eutr. 9,20; cf. Pan. 2(10),4,3). In AD 407, battles erupted again in the tractus Aremoricanus (between the mouths of the Loire and the Seine). The revolt was finally suppressed before the year 417 by Exuperantius, a relative of  Rutilius Namatianus (Rut. Namat.…

Baggage train

(5 words)

see  Impedimenta

Baghdad, Iraq Museum

(9 words)

see Iraq Baghdad Museum

Bagistana

(4 words)

see  Bisutun

Bagoas

(192 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Βαγώας; Bagṓas), Greek name for Persian eunuchs (Plin. HN 13,41). [German version] [1] Commander of Artaxerxes Ochus, 338 BC ‘An extremely impudent and sacrilegious man’ (Diod. Sic. 16,47,4) who took part in the renewed conquest of Egypt led by  Artaxerxes Ochus, became commander-in-chief of the Upper Satrapies, then  chiliarchos (‘lord of the realm’ Diod. Sic. 16,50,8). In 338 BC, he poisoned the king, in 336, he poisoned the king's son and successor  Arses, and installed a courtier on the throne, who then adopt…
▲   Back to top   ▲