Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Cadusii

(113 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Καδούσιοι; Kadoúsioi, Lat. Cadusii). Iranian group of nomadic tribes in the mountains between Media and the coast of the Caspian Sea, neighbours of the Anariaci and Albani (Str. 11,8,1). The Pantimati and Dareitai (Hdt. 3,92) possibly also belonged to the C. The  Achaemenids [2] had to battle against several revolts of the C.: in 408/7 BC, Artaxerxes II fought unsuccessfully (Xen. Hell. 2,1,13), but Artaxerxes III Ochus defeated and pacified them shortly after coming to power (359 B…

Cadyanda

(219 words)

Author(s): Wörrle, Michael (Munich)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Lycii, Lycia (Καδυάνα; Kadyánda). Mountain city in north-west Lycia south of today's Dereköy, above the inland plains of Üzümlü, comprising a large territory that borders on Bubon in the north and on Araxa in the east [1. 377-392; 2; 3]. The type of graves and the particular coin minting during the classical period both indicate the significance of the old Lycian settlement Χadawāti within the region ruled by Xanthus [4. 31-35; 5; 6. 31f.,…

Caeadas

(77 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καιάδας; Kaiádas). A ravine in Taygetus into which the Spartans pushed criminals and prisoners of war condemned to death. It is presumed to be located south-east of Mistra near Parori [1] or north-west of Mistra near Tripi [2]. Documented in: Καιάδας, Thuc. 1,134,4; Κεάδας, Paus. 4,18,4; Καιέτας, Str. 8,5,7. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography 1 E. Curtius, Peloponnesos 2, 1852, 252 2 O. Rayet, in: Annales de la Faculté des Lettres de Bordeaux 2, 1880, 353 n. 2.

Caecalus

(60 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari)
[German version] Epic poet from Argos, mentioned by Ath. 1,13b in a catalogue listing the authors of poems ‘On fishing (Ἁλιευτικά). The form of his name, given in the Athenaeus MSS as Καικλον and by the Suda (3,1596) as Κικίλιο, derives from a conjecture by Meineke. Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) Bibliography 1 SH 237 2 G. Thiele, s.v. C., RE, 11, 1496-1497.

Caecias

(180 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] (καικίας; kaikías, Latin caecias). This local wind name is supposedly derived from the river  Caecus [2] in Mysia (Ach. Tat. Introductio in Aratum 33, p. 68 Maas). As one of the ánemoi katholikoí (the common winds [1. 2305]), the C., also called Hellēspontías (Ἑλλησποντίας) by some, was a joint wind of  Boreas and  Eurus; it was said to blow from the north-east and to form large clouds because of its coldness and dampness (Aristot. Mete. 2,6,364b 18f. and 24-29). Originally, the name referred to the wind squall blowing t…

Caecilia

(562 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) | Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Stegmann, Helena (Bonn)
[German version] [1] C. Gaia Wife of Tarquinius Priscus Wife of  Tarquinius Priscus (Fest. p. 276); in Plin. HN 8,194 and Paul. Fest. s.v. G.C. p. 85 L., her name is  Tanaquil (refer [1]). Her name links her to the goddess Gaia and thus with wedding rites. For the connection with the ager Tarquiniorum cf. Liv. 2,5; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 5,13,2-4, with the river god Tiber [2. 378-83]. For the name C. [2. 382]. Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) Bibliography 1 R. Thomsen, King Servius Tullius, 1980, Index s.v. Tanaquil 2 A. Momigliano, Roma Arcaica, 1989, 371-83 (with all sources). …

Caecilianus

(269 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover)
[German version] [1] Bishop of Carthage, from AD 311/12 In 311/312 (according to [1] around 309/310), C. was ordained bishop of Carthage by Felix of Apthugni. A council of 70 bishops under the leadership of the Numidian primate Secundus of Tigisi declared C.'s election invalid and accused Felix of traditio. In his place, Maiorinus was elected at first, with (313)  Donatus following shortly afterwards. Emperor Constantine declared his support for C. (cf. especially Constantine's letter in Euseb. Hist. eccl. 10,5,15-17; 10,6f.). The dispute with…

Caecilius

(6,633 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) | Et al.
Name of a plebeian gens (probably derived from Caeculus, older form is Caicilios, Greek Καικίλιος, Κεκίλιος [ Kaikílios, Kekílios]; ThlL, Onom. 12-14), whose existence is documented since the 5th cent. (since C. [I 1]), but who only gained importance in the 2nd cent.; their most famous branch were the C. Metelli (I 10-32). A later explanation related the name back to Caeculus, the legendary founder of Praeneste, or Caecas, a companion of Aeneas (Fest. p. 38). I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] C., Q. Supposedly people's tribune in 439 BC Supposedly people's tribune in 439 BC …

Caecina

(1,087 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
Roman family name of Etruscan origin ( Ceicna, Schulze, 75, 285, 567; ThlL, Onom. 15f.), whose bearers belonged to the city aristocracy of Volaterrae (cf. Cic. Fam. 6,6,9), where the family is attested in several branches and partly through richly adorned graves. (CIE 18-24; 36-42 et al.). The lineage appeared in Rome from the 1st cent. BC, but never lost its links with its homeland (cognomen Tuscus in C. [II 9]); villa of the Roman city prefect of AD 414, Caecina Decius Atinatius Albinus, (PLRE 1, 50)…

Caecinus

(67 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καικῖνος; Kaikînos). According to Paus. 6,6,4, the C. is the border river between  Locri and Rhegium, where the Athenians under  Laches [1] defeated the Locrians under Proxenus (Thuc. 3,103,3) in what is today Amendolea/Sicily. The Locrian fist fighter Euthymus was worshipped at a hero-shrine and regarded as the son of the river god C. (Ael. VH 8,18). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography Nissen 2, 955.

Caecosthenes

(101 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Καικοσθένης; Kaikosthénēs). Son of Apollonides, bronze sculptor from Athens. Eight bases from the early 2nd cent. BC are inscribed with his and his brother Dies' signature. Some originate from portrait statues, which is why C. is usually identified as Chalcosthenes, who, according to Pliny, is supposed to have mostly sculpted statues of actors and athletes. In the Athenian Kerameikos, one could find ‘rough’ statues of gods and goddesses made of terracotta, perhaps the clay models for bronze statues. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Overbeck no. 1380-1381 Lo…

Caeculus

(180 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Mythical founder of  Praeneste (Cato Orig. 59 Peter; Verg. Aen. 7,678-81; Serv. Aen. 7,678; Solin. 2,9, according to the libri Praenestini; Festus s.v.). Conceived from a spark of the hearth fire and thus a son of  Vulcanus (or euhemeristically -- according to Cato -- found on a hearth), he was abandoned and brought up by his maternal uncles. He gathered shepherds around him, and with them founded the town. This myth is a combination of familiar motives (birth from the hearth fire like  Tarquinius Pr…

Caedicius

(244 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
Name of a plebeian lineage, attestable from the 5th cent. BC (ThlL, Onom. 18f.). [German version] [1] C., L. People's tribune in 475 BC People's tribune in 475 BC (MRR 1, 28). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] C., M. Roman, allegedly heard a divine voice near the Vesta temple in 391 BC allegedly heard a divine voice near the Vesta temple in 391 BC, warning him of the impending attack by the Gauls. In the same place, the sanctuary of  Aius Locutius was later erected. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [3] C., Q. Centurion against the Etruscans According to a later a…

Caelemontium

(112 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] As regio II of the Augustan division of Rome (CIL XV 7190; for the preceding period, see Varro, Ling. lat. 5, 46), C. corresponds largely with the  Caelius Mons. Its expansion probably coincided with the slopes of the hill: in the west, it bordered  the Palatine, in the east it is questionable whether the Lateran was included. To the south, its approximate boundary is marked by the modern via delle Terme di Caracalla, and to the north, it was succeeded by regio III with the later Colosseum, at about the line of the modern via dei SS. Quattro Coronati. Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) B…

Caelestis

(290 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster)
[German version] Latin name for the female counterpart of the highest Punic-Berber deity  Saturnus. The earliest iconographic portrayal, on the denarii of Q. Caecilius Metellus 47-46 BC, show C. as a lion-headed figure, genius terrae Africae (RRC 1. 472, no. 460. 4. pl. LIV). Literary sources describe her as the city goddess of Carthage; C. was also the protective goddess of Thuburbo maius, Oea and probably of other towns; ruler of the stars in the heavens, and of the Earth with all its produce and its inhabitants, as well as of …

Caeles Vibenna

(5 words)

see  Mastarna

Caelia

(198 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] [1] Town of the Peucetii in Apulia Town of the Peucetii in Apulia at the via Municia Tranana, modern Ceglie del Campo (province of Bari). Over a length of more than 5 km encircled by a town wall. Inside, graves from the 6th/4th cents. BC; traces of centuriation. Minting in the 3rd cent. BC. (HN 46: ΚΑΙΛΙΝΟΝ). Municipium of the tribus Claudia (Str. 6,3,7; Ptol. 3,1,7). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography V. Roppo, C., 1921 M. Gervasio, in: Iapigia 1, 1930, 241-272 F. Biancofiore, La viabilità antica, in: ASPugl 15, 1962, 230-32 I. Albergo Frugis, Atti XI Conv. Tar…

Caelibatus

(260 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The unmarried state ( caelibatus) was a significant object of social evaluation and legal regulation in Rome. In the Republican period, perhaps following early precursors as early as 403 BC (Val. Max. 2,9,1), the censor (102, not 131 BC) Q. Caecilius Metellus Numidicus spoke out against the unmarried state and childlessness in a speech to the people (Gell. NA 1,6). Augustus took this up, expressly to justify the lex Iulia de maritandis ordinibus, in the first main piece of his legislation relating to marriage (18 BC) (Liv. 59). This law made it obliga…

Caelius

(1,467 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Schmitt-Pantel, Pauline (Paris) | Nutton, Vivian (London)
Plebeian family name (in MSS frequently confused with  Coelius), attested from the 2nd cent. BC. (ThlL, Onom. 24-26). I. Republican Age [German version] [I 1] C., C. praetor or propraetor in Gallia Cisalpina in 90 BC praetor or propraetor in Gallia Cisalpina in 90 BC (Liv. per. 73; MRR 2,25). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [I 2] C., C. see C.  Coelius. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [I 3] C., M. People's tribune in the 2nd cent. BC People's tribune in the 2nd cent. BC, against whom Cato -- perhaps as censor in 184 BC -- directed a speech (ORF I4 46-48) [1. 86]. Elver…

Caelius Mons

(377 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] [1] Hill in Rome Hill in Rome, c. 2 km long, 400-500 m high. Although Caelius Mons (CM) is counted amongst the oldest of the city's hills (Dion. Hal. 2,50,1; Tac. Ann. 4,56; 11,24), its largest part was outside the   pomerium . Even though graves were still sited there in the Republican age, the area later developed into a fashionable residential district (Cic. Off. 3,16,66; Plin. HN 36,48; Tac. Ann. 4,64); in the Imperial Age, when the slopes of the Esquilin and the Colosseum were built up with insulae, the fashionable district moved to the upper part of the hill. …

Caelus, Caelum

(121 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] Translation of the Greek  Uranus (‘Heaven’). The genealogy of C. (Cic. Nat. D. 2,63.3,44; Hyg. Fab. praef. 2) corresponds with some variations to that in Hesiod. Varro (Ling. 5,57) named C. and Terra as the oldest of the deities. C. had no cult in Rome; inscriptions venerating him as aeternus (CIL VI 181-84; cf. also Vitr. 1,2,5) refer to foreign cults [1]. Graphically, C. is portrayed as a bearded man holding a garment above his head in the shape of an arch, as for example on the breast plate of the statue of Augustus of Prima Porta [2]. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 G. Wiss…

Caenae

(110 words)

Author(s): Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Xenophon (Καιναί; Kainaí). Settlement on the western bank of the Tigris close to the confluence of the Lower Zab; according to Xen. An. 2,4,28 a large, flourishing polis; cf. also Κάναι in Steph. Byz.; its identity with the Neo-Assyrian Kannu near Assur is doubtful, see [1]. In the Bible it is attested as Kannē(h) (Ez 27,23) and located near Tekrit [2]. Its etymology is unclear; perhaps it is related to Aramaic gannā, ‘wall’. Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen) Bibliography 1 F. R. Weissbach, s.v. Καιναί, RE 10, 1508 2 R. D. Barne…

Caeneus

(110 words)

Author(s): Visser, Edzard (Basle)
[German version] (Καινεύς; Kaineús, Lat. Caeneus). The name of a Lapith ruler, father of the Argonaut  Coronus. In early Greek mythology, this figure is clearly only connected to centauromachy. Because C. is invulnerable, the  Centaurs destroy him by ramming him into the earth with trees and stones (first recorded by Pind. fr. 167). His story is later elaborated on whereby C. was originally a girl (Lat. Caenis) who was raped by Poseidon and then requests that he change her into a man (schol. Apoll. Rhod. 1.57-64a; Ov. Met. 12.169-209; 459-535). Visser, Edzard (Basle) Bibliography F. Böme…

Caeni

(136 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Καινοί; Kainoí). Thracian tribe between Astae and Corpili in the region of the Paeti (Hdt. 7,110 Arr. Anab. 1,11,4). After the fall of the Odrysean kingdom, the C. were located in the area east of the river Hebrus spreading to the coasts of the Propontis and the Aegean Sea. The province Caenica at the lower reaches of the river Hebrus was named after this tribe (Plin. HN 4,47; Ptol. 3,11,6). In 188 BC, the C. followed the advice of Philip V and attacked the baggage train of Cn. Ma…

Caenina

(81 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Town in Latium, probably near Antemnae, inhabited by Siculi and Aborigines; legend has it that Romulus captured and destroyed the town, then ruled by King Acro; Romulus was also supposedly the first to sacrifice   spolia opima to Jupiter Feretrius. There is documentary evidence for the Caeninenses sacerdotes in imperial Rome, but the town itself had disappeared at the latest by the time of Pliny the Elder (HN 3,68). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography Nissen, 2, 560 Ruggiero, 2, 10.

Caenus

(62 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καῖνυς; Kaînys). The Italian foothills (modern Punta del Pezzo), from where the shortest distance between the mainland and Sicily ( Pelorias) across the  fretum Siculum was measured (Str. 6,1,5: 6 stades; Thuc. 6,1: 20 stades; Plin. HN 3,73: 12 stades; ibid. 86: 1.5 miles -- the modern measurement is about 3.2 km). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography Nissen, vol. 2, 962.

Caepio

(135 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] A.C. Crispinus Quaestor in Pontus-Bithynia, beginning of the first cent. AD Quaestor in Pontus-Bithynia under the proconsul Granius Marcellus, against whom he raised charges of high treason before the Senate in AD 15 (Tac. Ann. 1,74). The urn with his ashes was found in the ‘Tomb of the Platorini’ (CIL VI 31762) [1. 41ff., 52]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] A. C. Crispinus Cos. suff. in an unknown year Cos. suff. in an unknown year (PIR2 C 150). Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] Ti. C. Hispo Cos. suff. perhaps in AD 101 or 102 Cos. suff. perhaps in …

Caeratus

(45 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Καίρατος; Kaíratos). River on Crete. On its western bank lies  Cnossus, occasionally also referred to as C. (Str. 10,4,8; Callim. H. 3,44; Eust. in Dionys. Per. 498). Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) Bibliography M. S. F. Hood, D. Smyth, Archaeological Survey of the Knossos Area, 21981.

Caere

(389 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Social Wars | Theatre | Tribus | Umbri, Umbria | Coloniae | Etrusci, Etruria | Etrusci, Etruria | Italy, languages | Colonization | Oracles | Phoenicians, Poeni (Καιρέα; Kairéa, Ἄγυλλα; Ágylla, Etruscan Cisra). Town in southern Etruria ( c. 150 ha.) on a tuff plain in the north-east of which lies what is now Cerveteri. Founded by the Pelasgians (Plin. HN 3,51; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,20; 3,58; Str. 5,2,3; Steph. Byz. s.v. K.), C. demonstrates a pattern of development that stretches …

Caerellius

(189 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] Q.C. Knight, 3rd cent. AD Eques from a provincial town; in AD 238, Censorinus dedicated De die natali to him (PIR2 C 156). Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] Q.C. (= Cerellius) Apollinaris Praetorian tribune, 3rd cent. AD Praetorian tribune who, after serving twice as procurator, is attested as praef. vigilum in AD 212 (CIL VI 1063 = ILS 2178). Admitted to the ordo senatorius (AE 1969/70, 193: funerary inscription) [1. 59ff.; 2. 230]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] C.C. Fufidius Annius Ravus Pollittianus Official, 3rd cent. AD Senator, quaesto…

Caeretan hydriae

(515 words)

Author(s): Steinhart, Matthias (Freiburg)
[German version] A collection of hydriae (about 40 have been documented to date), dating from 530-510 BC, from a workshop which was presumably located in Caere, the main finding place; the term Caeretan hydriae (CH) was coined by C. Humann and O. Puchstein [1. 198]. After they were for many years considered to be of Etruscan or Corinthian origin, they are now regarded as the work of immigrant eastern Greek master potters, a view supported by Ionian signatures [1. 46f., no. 30]. CH are wide vessels…

Caerius

(30 words)

Author(s): Pressler, Frank (Heidelberg)
[German version] (Καίριος; Kaírios). Tragedian who, according to DID A 3b, 55, won once at the Lenaea, probably in 351 BC. Pressler, Frank (Heidelberg) Bibliography Mette, 183 TrGF 82.

Caesar

(180 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] (Καῖσαρ/ Kaîsar). At first a   cognomen of the gens Iulia; after the adoption of Octavian ( Augustus) by  Caesar it became established, in the style of a gentilicium as a component -- from Claudius [III 1] (from the gens Claudia) onwards not inherited -- of the names of all Roman rulers, with the exception of Vitellius [II 2] ( recusatio, ‘repudiation’, of the C. name: Tac. Hist. 1,62,2; 2,62,2; 3,58,3; Suet. Vit. 8). The individual designated C., usually a son or adoptive son, was thereby named successor [1. 24]. Under the tetrarchy (  Tetrárchēs IV)…

Caesar

(5,998 words)

Author(s): Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
I. Historical [German version] A. Youth and early career C. Iulius Caesar was born in 100 BC on the 13th of Quintilis (from 44 BC: Iulius/July); his mother was Aurelia, a daughter of L. Aurelius Cotta ( cos. 119 BC; [1. 327]). His father became praetor in 92 BC, and died 85 BC. Nothing is known of C.'s childhood and early youth. As it was the custom for the Roman aristocracy, C., too, presumably spent his first years in the care of his mother, followed between the ages of 7 and 15 by elementary schooling and grammatical tuition (G…

Caesaraugusta

(154 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | | Coloniae | Commerce | Pilgrimage Modern Zaragoza on the Iberus. Originally the likely location of the Iberian settlement of Saduia (Plin. HN 3,24: Salduba) in the tribal area of the Edetani (Ptol. 2,6,62). The Roman colony, founded under Augustus, developed into one of Spain's most important urban centres (cf. Mela 2,88; Str. 3,2,15; 4,10; 13). Important road junction. Possibly the garrison of the 10th legion up to the time of Nero. C.…

Caesarea

(992 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) | Leisten, Thomas (Princeton) | Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] [1] Main town of Cappadocia, modern Kayseri This item can be found on the following maps: Sassanids | Syria | Byzantium | Christianity | Zenobia | | Alexander | Hellenistic states | Hellenistic states | Asia Minor | Limes | Limes | Pompeius | Rome | Rome (Καισάρεια; Kaisáreia, Iranian or cuneiform Mazaka). Main town of  Cappadocia (Str. 12,2,7-9), modern Kayseri. [German version] I. Early History to Roman Times C. succeeded the nearby ancient centre of Kaniš (Kültepe;  Asia Minor), although that was still of importance in Hellenistic and Roman time…

Caesarism

(2,331 words)

Author(s): Kloft, Hans (Bremen RWG) | Köhler, Jens (Rome)
Kloft, Hans (Bremen RWG) Köhler, Jens (Rome) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) The concept of Caesarism covers only one part, albeit an important one, of the historical reception of Caesar in modern times. Its use in the political discourse of the 19th and early 20th cents. was complemented by scholarly, artistic and literary interpretations (e.g. Thornton Wilder, The Ides of March, 1948; Bertolt Brecht, Die Geschäfte des Herrn Julius Caesar, 1957, [17. 119ff.; 13. 247ff.] and its adaptation and use in films such as Little Caesar, 1930; Cleopatra, 1963; and Asterix and the Laurel…

Caesarius

(708 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Uthemann, Karl-Heinz (Amsterdam)
[German version] [1] Official, 4th cent. AD Hailing from Cilicia, C. was educated in Antioch (Lib. Ep. 1399). He was a brother of  Alypius (Jul. Ep. 9-10). In AD 362-363, he was possibly vicarius Asiae (Lib. Ep. 764; 1384). After the death of  Iulianus, he became comes rerum privatarum (Cod. Theod. 10,1,8) and gained great influence at the court of Valens (Lib. Ep. 1449; 1456). As praef. urbis Constantinopolitanae, C. was taken prisoner by the usurper Procopius in 365 (Amm. Marc. 26,7,4; Zos. 4,6,2) and possibly executed (Them. Or.7,92c). He was the recipient of…

Caesarodunum

(239 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: (Καισαρόδουνον; Kaisaródounon). Capital of the Celtic  Turoni (Ptol. 2,8,14; Tab. Peut. 2,3; Notitia Galliarum 3); probably since Augustus the civitas Turonorum on a bluff on the left bank of the  Liger (the modern Loire), about 16 km above its confluence with the Cares (the modern Cher); the modern Tours (Dép. Indre-et-Loire). The Celtic settlement was directly opposite on the right bank of the river; in the 1st cent. AD it was transferred to the plain between th…

Caesaromagus

(177 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre Civitas, main centre of the  Bellovaci on a loop of the river Thérain, modern Beauvais (Oise). There is no archaeological evidence of a preceding Celtic settlement in this location ( Bratuspantium), nor for the assumption -- derived from the name C. -- that it was founded by either Caesar or Augustus. The beginnings of Gallo-Roman urbanism probably lay in the early 1st cent. AD, more significant traces of building structures point to the …

Caesellius Vindex

(143 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Probably somewhat older than  Terentius Scaurus and  Sulpicius Apollinaris; with his alphabetical lexicalization of linguistic-antiquarian material under linguistic aspects, he produced a work, which in his archaizing tendency was characteristic of the Hadrianic era ( Stromateis sive Commentaria lectionum antiquarum, probably 20 bks.). The material was taken from republican authors up to Virgil and was likely substantially based on  Probus. As famous as it was disputed, it also exposed -- according to Gell. NA 2,16,5ff…

Caesena

(108 words)

Author(s): Susini, Giancarlo (Bologna)
[German version] Small Umbrian-Celtic town at the foot of Mt. Garampo on the river Savio (Str. 5,1,11; Cic. Fam., 16,27,2; cf. also the Cesuola, a stream, which flows into the Savio), modern Cesena. Road junction on the via Aemilia; municipium, possibly tribus Pollia. Centre of centuriation. Susini, Giancarlo (Bologna) Bibliography A. Calbi, La tradizione locale dell'antichità cesenate, in: Storia di Cesena 1, 1982, 223-231 A. Donati, Aemilia tributim discripta, 1967, 49f. Id., Fonti cesenati romani, in: Studi Romagnoli 15, 1965, 11-67 A. Solari, Curva Caesena, in: BCAR 56…

Caesennius

(268 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] L.C. Antoninus Consul. suff. 128 AD Cos. suff. in AD 128, perhaps son of C. [5] [1. 49, 118]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] A.C. Gallus Roman military and governor, 1st cent. AD As legate of the legio XII Fulminata, he fought the Jewish rebellion in AD 66 (Jos. Bell. Iud. 2,510ff.; 3,31). After a suffect consulate, he was governor of Cappadocia-Galatia from 80 to 82/3 (PIR2 C 170) [2. 304ff.]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] L. Iunius C. Paetus Roman governor, 1st cent. AD Cos. ord. in AD 61 (AE 1973, 141f.). Extraordinary governor of C…

Caesernius

(178 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] T.C. Statius Quinctius Macedo Knight, around 100 AD Eques from Aquileia. Procurator of Pannonia(?), praesidial procurator of Mauretania Caesariensis in AD 107 (PIR2 C 181) [1. 158ff.]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] T.C. Statius Quinctius Macedo Quinctianus Senator under Hadrian Son of C. [1]. He was much supported in his senatorial career by Hadrian; i.a., he was comes Hadriani per Orientem et Illyricum, and attained a suffect consulate in c. AD 138, (AE 1957, 135; CIL V 865 = ILS 1069) [2. 347]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] T.C. Stat…

Caesia Silva

(6 words)

see  Silva Caesia

Caesius

(558 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Leonhardt, Jürgen (Marburg/Lahn)
Roman family name, evident from the 3rd. cent. BC, in Rome from the 1st cent. (Schulze, 135 ThlL, Onom. 49-51). I. Republican Age [German version] [I 1] C., L. Mint master 112 or 111 BC Mint master 112 or 111 BC (RRC 298), perhaps identical with the praetor or propraetor of Hispania ulterior of 104 BC (AE 1984, 495). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography D. Nörr, Aspekte des röm. Völkerrechtes, 1989, 24-27. [German version] [I 2] C., M. Praetor in 75 BC Praetor in 75 BC. (Cic. Verr. 2,1,130; MRR 3,44f.). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) II. Imperial Age [German version] [II 1] C. Anthianus, …

Caeso

(4 words)

see  Kaeso

Caesonius

(293 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman family name, documented from the 1st cent. BC (Schulze 136f.; ThlL, Onom. 54f.). I. Republican Age [German version] [I 1] C., M. Official, 1st cent. AD In 74 BC, judge in the first trial of A. Cluentius Habitus, judge in the  Verres trial in 70 BC; in 69 BC, curule aedile together with Cicero (Cic. Verr. 1,29; MRR 2,132). Possibly praetor in 66 BC, because he was regarded as a candidate for the consulship of 63 BC (Cic. Att. 1,1,1); probably identical with the C. mentioned by Cicero (Att. 12,11). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) II. Imperial Age [German version] [II 1] L.C. Lucillus Macer R…

Caesorix

(27 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celticized Germanic name ending in - rix ‘king’ [1.160]. Cimbrian chieftain ( Cimbri), captured at Vercellae in 101 BC. (Oros. 5,16,21). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Schmidt.

Caestus

(4 words)

see  Fist-fighting

Caiatia

(109 words)

Author(s): Buonocore, Marco (Rome)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae Town of the  Caudini in Samnium at the junction of the roads connecting Capua, Allifae and Telesia, modern Caiazzo. Possibly a civitas sine suffragio prior to 306 BC, C. became a civitas foederata after the Second Punic War and, following the Social Wars, in 89 BC a municipium of the tribus Falerna, with II viri. There is documentary evidence of a bishop's seat after AD 967. Buonocore, Marco (Rome) Bibliography G. Chouquer (ed.), Structures agraires en Italie centro-méridionale, Collection de l'Ecole Fra…

Caicus

(165 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Zingg, Reto (Basle)
(Κάϊκος; Káikos). [German version] [1] River in Western Asia Minor Today called Bakır Çayı. River in western Asia Minor (Hdt. 6,28; 7,42; Xen. An. 7,8,18; Str. 12,8,12; 13,1,70; Arr. Anab. 5,6,4; Paus. 1,10,4; 5,13,3). It rises in the western Temnus mountains, a landscape that Livy (37,37,3) and Pliny (HN 5,125) referred to as Teuthrania. The plain named after the river C. was fertile and well populated. C. reached the ocean between Elaia and Pitane in the Aeolis, where the river's sedimentation has pushed the land far into the bay of Elaia (the Ἐλαΐτης κόλπος; Elaítes kólpos, today's Can…

Caieta

(191 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Port on the Tyrrhenian Sea, located in the foothills of the same name which form the western end of the sinus Caietanus or Formianus; modern Gaeta (province of Latina). It was reputedly named after either  Aeetes, the father of Medea (Lycoph. 1274), or the wet-nurse of  Aeneas [1], who was supposedly buried there (Verg. Aen. 7,1-7), or after the shoals in its bay (Laconian καιέτας, Str. 5,3,6); temple of Apollo (Liv. 40,2,4). In Roman times, it was a health resort, same as Formiae (four miles away), with villae and attached mausolea. C. was also the location of the villae of S…

Caiphas

(193 words)

Author(s): Wandrey, Irina (Berlin)
[German version] (Και(α)φᾶς, Cai(a)phâs). Joseph, with the epithet Caiphas (from Aramaic qayyāfā), was high priest of the Temple of Jerusalem (AD 18-36) and therefore the leader of the Sanhedrin ( Synhedrion), the highest Jewish authority for civil and political issues during Hellenistic and Roman times. As son-in-law of the high priest Ananus (or Annas, Hannas; AD 6-15), he belonged to one of the important families of priests that regularly occupied this office (Jo 18,13; also mPar 3,5 and tYev 1,10) [4. 234]. He was appointed by the Roman procurator Valerius Gratus (AD 15-26), …

Cairo, Egyptian Museum

(2,113 words)

Author(s): Saleh, Mohamed (Cairo )
Saleh, Mohamed (Cairo ) [German version] A. History (CT) A firman (decree) concerning the preservation of antiquities was issued in Egypt for the first time in 1835, after the country's monuments had for very many years been plundered by native and foreign treasure-hunters and sent to Europe. At the same time, the scholar Refaa el Tahtawi was commissioned by the Wali (governor) Mohamed Ali to set up a museum for Egyptian antiquities under his supervision, which was to be located in the Ezbakiah Garden in …

Calabri, Calabria

(636 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Makris, Georgios (Bochum)
[German version] A. Definition South-eastern extension of the Italian peninsula (Str. 6,3,1: its name possibly of indigenous origin; [1; 2. 32], for different view [5]), modern Salento. Καλαβρία ( Kalabría) is first attested for Rhinto (Hsch. s.v. K.), c. 300 BC; according to Str. 6,3,5, most authors used Kalabría synonymously with Ἰαπυγία ( Iapygía), Μεσσαπία ( Messapía) and Σαλεντίνη ( Salentínē) for the peninsula south of the isthmus of Tarentum -- Brundisium. The earliest mention of the tribe of that region as Καλαβροί ( Kalaboí) in Pol. 10.1; in Roman triumphs (of 280, 2…

Calachene

(47 words)

Author(s): Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen)
[German version] (Καλαχηνή; Kalachēnḗ). Region bordered by the  Tigris and the Great Zab around the earlier Neo-Assyrian capital  Kalḫu (now Nimrūd), east of the Tigris, north of the  Adiabene (Str. 11,4,8; 11,14,12; 16,1,1; Ptol. 6,1,2) Kessler, Karlheinz (Emskirchen) Bibliography F. H. Weissbach, s.v. K., RE 10, 1530.

Calagurris

(168 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] [1] Fibularia This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity A settlement of the  Vascones, probably the modern Loarre in the Spanish province of Huesca in Spain. Bishop Ianuarius, one of the participants in the Council of Iliberis, may have come from C. Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Tovar 3, 381-382. [German version] [2] Nasica This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity Iberian town on the Iberus in the Spanish province of Zaragoza, modern Calahorra. It played a part in the Celtiberian Wars (181-133 BC) and i…

Calais and Zetes

(355 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier)
[German version] (Κάλαϊς, Ζήτης; Kálaïs, Zḗtēs). Boreads, wind gods, the winged sons of  Boreas and  Oreithyia, brothers of Cleopatra and Chione [1]. Sent by their father from Thrace (Pind. Pyth. 4.179-183), they become members of the  Argonauts (Apollod. 1.111; 3.199; Apoll. Rhod. 1.211-223; Ov. Met. 6.712-721). In Salmydessus they free the blind prophet  Phineus, who is married to Cleopatra, from the  Harpies. In the fight, C. and Z. were initially supposed to die, like the Harpies (Apollod. 1.122; 3.199 [1. 2291; 2. 104ff.]). However, divine intervention rescues both la…

Calama

(117 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Coloniae | Pilgrimage Probably a Libyan settlement of the later Africa proconsularis, 74 km south-west of Hippo Regius, modern Guelma, strongly influenced by Punic traditions (documentary evidence: KAI 165-169; Inscr. latines de l'Algérie 1, 233; 290). Under Trajan (AD 98-117), it became a   municipium (Inscr. latines de l'Algérie 1, 285), and a   colonia before 283 (Inscr. latines de l'Algérie 1, 247). Imperial domains were located within the territory of C. (CIL VIII 1…

Calamae

(73 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] (Καλάμαι; Kalámai). Settlement in south-east Messenia (κώμη, Paus. 4,31,3; χωρίον, Pol. 5,92,4 for 217 BC). Small hillock with remains of walls, 1 km south of the modern Jannitsa. C. probably extended to a further hillside nearby, where today a chapel of Hagios Vasilios is found. The modern Kalamata (officially Kalamai) corresponds with the ancient Pharae. Inscriptions: IG V 1, 1369f. Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography E. Meyer, s.v. Messenien, RE Suppl. 15, 180f.

Calamis

(634 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] Greek sculptor; ancient sources praise his horses and female figures, refer to him as the sculptor who made the transition to the classical period. He endowed his works with both ‘hardness’ and ‘grace’. He is linked with  Onatas,  Praxiteles and  Scopas. Many researchers have tried to solve the chronological contradictions by assuming that there were numerous sculptors of the same name with various surviving works ascribed to them. Since no work can be sufficiently proven to originate from C., the extent of his work is not known. From the famous C. originated a stat…

Calamites

(88 words)

Author(s): Vogeler, Joachim (Baton Rouge, LA)
[German version] (Καλαμίτης; Kalamítēs). Attic hero whose sanctuary was probably not far from the market, near the municipal Lenaion in Athens, which suggests a connection to Dionysus [1. 124]. According to schol. Patm. on Demosth. Or. 18.129, C. derives from the word   kálamos (‘reed’) [3]; by deriving kalámē (‘grain stalk’) according to a different tradition [2], C. would become a part of the Demeter circle. Vogeler, Joachim (Baton Rouge, LA) Bibliography 1 Deubner 2 S. Eitrem, s.v. K., RE 10, 1537 3 M. J. Sakkélion, Scholies de Démosthène, in: BCH 1, 1877, 142.

Calamus

(523 words)

Author(s): Vogeler, Joachim (Baton Rouge, LA) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] Son of Maeander (Κάλαμος; Kálamos). Son of the river god  Maeander. When his lover Carpus drowns, C. begs Zeus for a premature death. In response, Zeus turns him into a reed, Carpus into a field fruit (Serv. Ecl. 5,48; Nonn. Dion. 11,370ff.; [2. 279]). In a different myth, C. is the lover of  Cissus [3. 168 n. 2]. Vogeler, Joachim (Baton Rouge, LA) Bibliography 1 H. Meyer, s.v. K., RE 10, 1538 2 J. Murr, Die Pflanzenwelt in der griech. Myth., 1880 3 E. Rohde, Der griech. Roman, 31914. [German version] [2] All types of reeds κάλαμος, Lat. calamus, harundo, canna, the n…

Calamus

(4 words)

see  Pen

Calanus

(265 words)

Author(s): Muckensturm-Poulle, Claire (Besançon)
[German version] Name or nickname of an Indian sage who is said to have come into contact with the Greeks when Alexander the Great stayed in Taxila at the beginning of 326 BC. According to his own report, Onesicritus made contact with the Brahmans of Taxila on the orders of Alexander; he claims that C. initially mocked him, but then related to him his theory on the ages of the world (cf. Str. 15,1,63-65; Plut. Alexander 65). According to Megasthenes (in Str. 15,1,68; Arr. Anab. 7,2) and the later …

Calasiris

(38 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[German version] (Καλάσιρις; Kalásiris).The priest C. is one of the main figures in  Heliodorus' [8] novel Aithiopiká. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) Bibliography H. Kees, s.v. Kalasiris, RE 10, 1547  A.B. Lloyd, Herodotus, Book II, vol. 2, 1976, 342.

Calata comitia

(306 words)

Author(s): Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen)
[German version] Apart from the   comitia curiata the earliest form of the Roman people's Assembly convened by the   pontifices twice yearly [1. 215] (about 6th-4th cents. BC). The calata comitia (CC) take their name from the word calare (‘to call’; cf. Fest. p. 251 s.v. procalare) that was common in priestly language etc. in conjunction with the ‘proclamation’ of the dies fasti ( Calendar) [2. 312]. The sources have passed down to us the occasions for the convening of the CC -- the   inauguratio of the rex (later of the rex sacrorum) and the so-called ‘great Flamines’ of Rome (Gell. …

Calatiae

(67 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Hecat. in Steph. Byz. FGrH; Kallatiai in Hdt. 3,38). Indian ethnic group whose members according to Hdt. used to eat their parents -- an ethnological curiosity that in another citation (Hdt. 3,99) was attributed to another Indian people, the Padaioi, likewise to the Iranian Massagetae (Hdt. 1,216) and the  Issedones (Hdt. 4,26). Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography K. Karttunen, India in Early Greek Literature, 1989, 197-202.

Calatores

(133 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] From calare -- ‘to call’. a) Slaves who convey orders (Fest. p. 34; differently [1] who equates calatores with nomenclatores on the basis of Plaut. Merc. 852. The latter are slaves who give their masters the names of those passing while away). b) Assistants of the higher priests, almost exclusively freed persons. They are already in evidence on the Forum stele (CIL I2 1). Their task was to prepare the way for the priest by calling and to stop the priest coming into contact with polluted elements or unfavourable omens prior to sacrifices. The…

Calaurea

(207 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen)
[German version] (Καλαύρεια; Kalaúreia). Island in the south of the Saronic Gulf off the coast of the Argive Acte (21 km2, up to a height of 283 m), modern Poros. Grave finds have verified that the island was already inhabited in Mycenaean times [1. 297ff.]. The ancient town with its famous  Poseidon sanctuary (right of asylum) -- partially extant and excavated -- was situated in the interior of the island. The earliest finds from the sanctuary date back to the geometric period; the temple was built at the end of …

Calavius

(157 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
Campanian family name, whose bearers were highly respected in Capua, and who in the Republican age were one of Rome's foremost enemies (ThlL, Onom. 71). [German version] [1] Calavii Arsonists in Rome, executed 210 BC were executed for arson in Rome in 210 BC (Liv. 26,27). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] C., Novius and Ovius Header of a conspiracy against the Romans in 314 BC They headed a conspiracy against the Romans in 314 BC, and after their exposure committed suicide (Liv. 9,26,7). Their father was perhaps Ofilius C., named in Livy (9,7,2-5) Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Boc…

Calceus

(275 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Roman shoe or half-boot made of leather that was probably adopted from the Etruscans and was part of the clothing ( vestis forensis) of the noble Roman citizen. If a member of the nobility dressed in other shoes in public, he would be criticized (Suet.Tib. 13; an exception was the dress for the banquet at which people wore the solla; Hor. Sat. 2,8,77; Mart. 3,50,3; Suet. Vit. 2). In Roman literature and art the calceus was represented in many ways; three variants can be distinguished that at the same time served to differentiate between social ranks. Th…

Calceus Herculis

(84 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Oasis west of the Aurès mountains, nowadays probably El-Kantara (north of Biskra). The road from Lambaesis to the Numidian limes went through C. (Tab. Peut. 3,5). This strategically important location was, in the 2nd and 3rd cent., garrison to archers and camel-riders from Emesa and Palmyra, who introduced their native gods to C.H.: CIL VIII 1, 2502, 2505, 2515; Suppl. 2, 18007f. Further inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 2496-2515; Suppl. 2, 18004-18012; AE 1992, 522f. no. 1848-1854. Huß, Werner (Bamberg)

Calchas

(284 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Κάλχας; Kálchas, Lat. Calchas). Son of Thestor, seer and augur for the Greeks during the Trojan War who ‘knew what is, what will be, and what was’ (Hom. Il. 1.70). To the army gathered in  Aulis awaiting departure, C. correctly prophesied, based on the flight of birds, that Troy would be defeated in the tenth year of the war (Hom. Il. 2.303ff.; Kypria argumentum p. 40 Bernabé). When the Greek fleet was prevented from departing due to lack of wind, C. explained that Artemis was ang…

Calchedon

(726 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
This item can be found on the following maps: Pontos Euxeinos | Byzantium | Christianity | Diadochi and Epigoni | Hellenistic states | Colonization | Oracles | Peloponnesian War | Pergamum | Persian Wars | Pilgrimage | Pompeius | Delian League (Καλχηδών; Kalchēdṓn, also Chalkedon; Lat. Calchedon, Calcedon, Chalcedon). [German version] I. Prehistory to Roman Period Prehistorical settlement area on the south-eastern entrance into the  Bosporus (map); in c. 685 BC, the harbour town was founded as a Megarian colony; modern Kadıköy. Its territory extended along the e…

Calchus

(71 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
[German version] (Κάλχος; Kálchos). King of the Daunians ( Daunia), lover of  Circe prior to the arrival of Odysseus. Because he continues to importune her against her will, she drives him to madness with enchanted food and drink. As a Daunian army begins looking for him, Circe releases him from her spell, but only after C. promises never to set foot on her island again (Parthenius 12). Walde, Christine (Basle)

Calcidius

(247 words)

Author(s): Zaminer, Frieder (Berlin) | Hadot, Pierre (Limours)
[German version] (not Chalcidius). Christian philosopher; his dates are disputed: he either lived from the second half of the 3rd to the first half of the 4th cent. AD [1] or from the first half to the middle of 4th cent. [2]. Assigning his commentary on Plato's Timaeus to a particular school of thought (for Middle Platonism see [1] or Neoplatonism, see [2; 3; 4; 5]), is further complicated by the fact that important tenets, like those on providence and fatum, have basically remained unchanged from Middle Platonism to the end of Neoplatonism [6]. C.'s Timaeus commentary is also the first …

Calculi

(7 words)

see  Abacus; see  Board games

Caldarium

(7 words)

see  Baths; see  Thermae [1]

Caldis

(35 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Auxiliary fort, north-west of  Cirta, west of the modern Mechta Nahar. Many steles, dedicated to Saturnus. Inscriptions: Inscr. latines de l'Algérie 2,1, 3442-3569. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, sheet 8, no. 173.

Cale Acte

(133 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] (Καλὴ Ἀκτή; Kalḕ Áktē). Greek town on the northern coast of Sicily, founded in 446 BC by  Ducetius with the support of Archonides, the tyrant of Herbita (Diod. Sic. 12,8,2f.). As early as 495 BC,  Scythas of Zanclae had planned the foundation of an Ionian colony on that site. C.A. was probably first entered in around 200 BC into the lists of the theōrodókoi of Delphi. It was plundered by Verres (Cic. Verr. 2,3,101). Birth place of the rhetor  Caecilius [III 5]. Localized near the modern Caronia Marina. Remains of a reservoir, statue of a togatus. Coins: [1. 129f.]. Manganaro, …

Caledonii

(196 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Ancient authors applied the name C. variously: either to the inhabitants of Scotland north of a line from the Forth to the Clyde (Tac. Agr. 25), or to a tribe in the region of the Great Glen (Ptol. 2,3,8), or to a group of tribes in northern Scotland (Cass. Dio 76,12). The reference to Caledonia in Tac. Agr. 27 and to silvae Caledoniae in Plin. HN 4,102 suggests that the C. settled across a large area of eastern Scotland. Almost unknown prior to the Roman invasion, they offered fierce resistance to it, before they were decisively defeated by…

Calendar

(4,567 words)

Author(s): Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) | Freydank, Helmut (Potsdam)
A. Basic Principles [German version] 1. Term Calendar developed its modern meaning in post-antiquity from the Latin word for ‘debt register’ (  Calendarium ). In the following, the term is taken as an element of  chronography within a culture which attempts to describe or regulate annual periodicities. Typically, a day represents the smallest unit of a calendar ( Clocks). Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) [German version] 2. Social Construction of Time Hunting and farming both demand a harmonization with seasonal variations ( Seasons), thus leading to annually repeated patte…

Calendar

(3,617 words)

Author(s): Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) [German version] A. Traditions (CT) Of the many calendar systems of Greek and Roman Antiquity only the Jewish and the Julian Calendars survived in use beyond the late classical period. For many other systems, such as the Gaulish calendar, or that of Coligny, or the conventional lunisolar calendar of the Eastern Mediterranean, there are clear breaks in the tradition after the 4th cent. AD. The Julian Calendar, the system adopted by the Roman administration, was taken over by the Chri…

Calendarium

(269 words)

Author(s): Andreau, Jean (Paris)
[German version] The Roman calendarium was a register of  loans; the meaning of the word stems from the fact that loan agreements often came into force on the Kalendae, the first day of the month, and that the Kalendae or the Idus (mid-month) were commonly set as the day the loan became due. In their calendarium, private individuals kept a record in their of the sums they had loaned with interest, of the debtors, the provisions of the loan agreements and the due dates of the loans (Sen. Ep. 87,7; cf. Dig. 15,1,58). In the area of  public finances, the word calendarium could refer to the totalit…

Calenian Pottery

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Generic term for lower Italian black-glazed pottery ( Relief ware), evident from the second half of the 4th cent. to the 2nd cent. BC. The term Calenian Pottery (CP) (askoi, bowls, omphalos phialae, gutti) is commonly used for this group of vessels, yet they were undoubtedly also produced in other regions (Paestum, Sicily, Tarentum). Particularly well-known are bowls with medallions, worked in a medium relief (‘Arethusa bowls’); their origin from Cales (Calenus) or rather Campania…

Calenus

(33 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen (probably for descent from Cales) in the gens  Fufia in the 1st cent. BC; frequent epigraphical attestations in the imperial age (ThlL, Onom. 79). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)

Cales

(225 words)

Author(s): Garozzo, Bruno (Pisa) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] [2] This item can be found on the following maps: Social Wars | Theatre | Tribus | Coloniae | Coloniae Main centre of the Ausones in Campania (Καλησία; Kalēsía: Steph. Byz. s.v.; Calenum: Plin. HN 3,63; Cale), on an elevated plain, enclosed on three sides by the Rio de' Lauzi and the Rio di Pezzasecca, modern Calvi Risorta. For its foundation myth cf. Verg. Aen. 7,728 (Aurunca), Sil. Pun. 8,512; 12,525 (Calais), Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 6,32,37 (Volsci). Conquered by the Romans in 334 BC (Liv. 8,16; Vell. Pat. 1,14,3), municipium, seat of the quaestor for Campania (Tac. An…

Calesius

(36 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle)
[German version] (Καλήσιος; Kalḗsios). Trojan ally from Arisbe (northern Troad), charioteer of Axylus, slain together with Axylus by Diomedes (Hom. Il. 6.18). Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) Bibliography P. Wathelet, Dictionnaire des Troyens de l'Iliade, 1988, no. 184.

Calestrius

(153 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] C. Tiro Proconsul of the Baetica, around 107 BC Friend of Pliny the Younger (Ep. 7,16), quaestor Caesaris, tribunus plebis, praetor in AD 93, procos. prov. Baeticae c. AD 107 (Plin. Ep. 6,22,7; 9,5; PIR2 C 222) [1. 779ff.]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] T.C. Tiro Iulius Maternus Governor of Lycia-Pamphylia AD 132-135 Son of C. [3], governor of Lycia-Pamphylia AD 132-135 (AE 1972, 651a; IGR 3, 704, 1) [2. 83f.; 3. 39, 43]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] T.C. Tiro Orbius Speratus Cos. suff. in 122 Senator, probably a younger brother or …

Caletor

(87 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle)
(Καλήτωρ; Kalḗtōr). [German version] [1] Father of Aphareus Achaean, father of Aphareus who was killed by Aeneas (Hom. Il. 13.541). Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) [German version] [2] Cousin of Hector Trojan, son of  Clytius [4], cousin of Hector (Hom. Il. 15.419ff.), brother-in-law of  Cycnus [2] (Paus. 10.14.2). Killed by  Ajax [1] when attempting to set one of the Achaean ships on fire (Hom. Il. 15.419ff.;  Tabula Iliaca). Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) Bibliography R. Hampe, s.v. Alexandros (89), LIMC 1.1, 517 P. Wathelet, Dictionnaire des Troyens de l'Iliade, 1988, …

Calgacus

(59 words)

Author(s): Kunst, Christiane (Potsdam)
[German version] One of the Caledonian leaders ( dux) in the battle at mons Graupius (possibly north of Aberdeen) in the late summer of AD 84, which gained Agricola the triumphalia ornamenta (Tac. Agr. 29ff.), but did not lead to a permanent annexation of Caledonia. Kunst, Christiane (Potsdam) Bibliography W. S. Hanson, Agricola and the Conquest of the North, 1987.

Caliadne

(21 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Καλιάδνη, Καλιάνδη; Kaliádnē, Kaliándē). Naiad, mother of twelve sons fathered by Aegyptus (Apollod. 2.19). Zingg, Reto (Basle)

Calibration

(652 words)

Author(s): Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] In Greece, the authority over calibration as well as the control over official measures and weights lay in the hands of the agoranómoi, although from the mid 4th cent. BC at the latest there is evidence that assistant officials called metronómoi were in charge of these affairs. Fireproof moulds for weights were kept in the office of the market official or the scale master ( zygostátēs). Weights were poured from bronze or lead under official supervision and then were handed over to shops and to the authorities. The weights came in varying shapes…

Calidius

(260 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn)
Plebeian family name, attested in Rome from the 1st cent. BC (Schulze, 138; ThlL, Onom. 81f.). [German version] [1] C., M. Mint master in 117 or 116 BC Mint master in 117 or 116 BC (RRC 284), perhaps later praetor or propraetor (IG VII 18, Z. 14). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] C., M. Praetor in 57 BC Praetor in 57 BC; as such he supported Cicero's return from exile (Cic. P. Red. Sen. 22), and on this occasion probably gave the speech De domo Ciceronis (Quint. Inst. 10,1,23). In 52 BC, he took up the cause of T. Annius [I 14] Milo, the murderer of  Clodius Pulc…

Caliga

(4 words)

see  Shoes

Caligo

(40 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] Personification of darkness, analogous to the Greek  Erebus and Skotos. She is the mother of  Chaos, and by him she is also mother of Nox, Dies, Erebos and Aether (Hyg. Fab. praef. 1). Bloch, René (Berne)

Caligula

(871 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] C. (Iulius) Caesar Augustus Germanicus. Roman emperor AD 37-41. Born 31 August 12 in Antium, son of Germanicus and Agrippina the Elder. A grandnephew of Augustus and grandson of the triumvir Mark Antony by birth, he also became Augustus' grandson, following Germanicus' adoption by Tiberius. He was given the nickname C. (‘bootee’) by the soldiers on the Rhine front, where his mother had taken him in AD 14. On the 26 May 17, he took part in his father's triumph over Germania, follow…

Calindoea

(137 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Καλίνδοια; Kalíndoia). Town in Mygdonia/Macedonia near the modern Kalamoton. In the 5th cent. BC, C. was part of the  Bottice (IG I3 76) and was probably still independent in 360 BC (IG IV2 1, 94 Ib 13), but may have come into the possession of the Macedonian kings under Philip II, and, together with neighbouring settlements, passed on to Macedonian settlers as a ‘donation’ ( dōreá) by Alexander the Great (SEG 36, 626). Latest under Augustus, C. became an autonomous city with its own council, ekklesia, and politarchs (SEG 35, 744). Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/L…
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