Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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D

(81 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] is used in Lat. as an abbreviation of the Roman praenomen  Decimus. As a numeral the letter D stands for the value 500. Like the numeral  C (= 100) it is derived from a letter of the western Greek alphabet not used in the Latin alphabet: Φ (phi), which stands for the value 1,000; the letter form D, indicating half the value of 1,000, was derived by bisection of the Greek symbol (right half). Eder, Walter (Berlin)

Dachinabades

(59 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] Region of India to the south of  Barygaza, with the cities of Paithana and Tagara. Mentioned only in Peripl. m.r. 50f., where δάχανος has also been correctly explained as the Indian word for south, Old Indian dakṣiṇa. Probably following Middle Indian Dakkhiṇābadha (Old Indian dakṣiṇāpatha) as a term for the Indian peninsula. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)

Dacian

(5 words)

see  Balkans, languages

Dacicus

(114 words)

Author(s): Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf)
[German version] The victor's name D. was not assumed by Domitian, contrary to the report at Mart. 8 pr. Trajan was officially called D. only after 102; in 236 Maximinus assumed the name D. Maximus for himself and his son Maximus. In the case of later emperors the title was probably unofficial: Decius (D. maximus from 250, but only on Spanish milestones), Gallienus (D. max. only in ILS 552, from 257), Aurelian [3] (ILS 581, from 275). Constantine [1] I named himself D. Maximus in 336 (AE 1934, 158…

Daci, Dacia

(1,413 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague) | Kramer, Johannes (Trier)
(Roman province of Dacia). [German version] A. Origins The Dacian group of tribes originally settled an extensive territory north of the lower Danube; in the west it reached to the Pathisus (Theiss), in the east possibly to the Hierasus (Sireth) or the Pyretus (Pruth); it was bordered to the north by the crescent of the Carpathians. The D. were a Thracian people. The location of their settlements enabled them to enter into various kinds of relations with neighbouring peoples, e.g. the Scythians and Gepi…

Dadastana

(124 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Celts (Δαδάστανα; Dadástana, also Dabastana). Town in Galatia on the border with Bithynia, c. 20 km west of Nallıhan on the road from Nicaea to Ancyra [2. 31, 106f.]; belonged to Bithynia from the time of Augustus, from that of Diocletian to the prov. Galatia I (Amm. Marc. 25,10,12) [1. 160]. The emperor Jovian died here on 17 February, AD 364, on his way home from the Persian war. Here, a corps belonging to the usurper Procopius went over to Valens in 365 (Amm. Marc. 25,10,12; 26,8,5). Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) Bibliography 1 Mi…

Dadouchos

(4 words)

see  Mysteria

Daedala

(277 words)

Author(s): Schuler, Christoph (Tübingen) | Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) | Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin)
(Δαίδαλα; Daídala). [German version] [1] Fortified settlement north-west of Telmessus This item can be found on the following maps: Lycii, Lycia Fortified settlement north-west of Telmessus in the border region between Lycia and Caria, the eastern part of the Rhodian Peraea [2. 54-57, 97f.]. References: Str. 14,2,2; 3,1; Liv. 37,22,3; Steph. Byz. s.v. D.; Plin. HN 5,103. D. is identified with the ruins of Inlice Asarı [1. 32f.]; for location cf. Ptol. 5,3; Stadiasmos maris magni 256f.; inscriptions are lacking (orig…

Daedalidae

(96 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Δαιδαλίδαι; Daidalídai). Attic asty deme of the Cecropis phyle, from 307/6 to 201/0 BC of the Demetrias phyle, from AD 126/7 of the Hadrianis. One   bouleutes . With the Daedalion, mentioned only in the poletai inscription [1] and probably the sanctuary of the eponymous hero of D., it bordered to the south with the Alopece deme. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 J. Young, Greek Inscriptions, in: Hesperia 10, 1941, 14ff., esp. 20f. no. 1, l. 10f. Traill, Attica 10f., 50, 70, 109 no. 30, table 7, 12, 15 J. S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 14, 135.

Daedalion

(81 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαιδαλίων; Daidalíōn). Son of Heosphoros (Lucifer); brother of Ceyx; father of  Chione [2]. In his grief for the death of his only daughter, who scorned the beauty of Diana and was killed by her, he throws himself from the peak of Parnassus. Apollo, however, transforms him into a hawk (Ov. Met. 11,291-345; Hyg. Fab. 200). In Paus. 8,4,6 D. is the father of  Autolycus [1]. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography F. Bömer, Kommentar zu Ov. Met. B. X-XI, 1980, 313.

Daedalus

(1,013 words)

Author(s): Kearns, Emily (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Δαίδαλος; Daídalos). [German version] [1] Mythical craftsman, sculptor and inventor Mythical craftsman, sculptor and inventor, his very name belonging to a semantic field indicating objects created by astuteness and skill. In stories he is associated with Athens, Crete and Sicily. Judging from the development of artistic techniques, it is not impossible that the origins of the tradition lie at least partly in Crete, although whether D.'s name can be attested in the Linear B texts is a matter of dispute […

Daemon

(4 words)

see  Demons

Daesitiates

(385 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] One of the most important peoples in the interior of the prov. Dalmatia ( Dalmatae, Dalmatia), originally possibly in the loose confederation of the  Autariatae. They inhabited the valley of the upper Bathinus (Bosna) of the valley from the upper Urbanus (Vrbas) in the west to Rogatica in the east; their position has been confirmed through the discovery of an inscription (ILJug 1582 [1]) of a Valens Varron(is) f(ilius), princeps Desitiati(um) in Breza (22 km north-west of Sarajevo). The D. were perhaps attacked by the future Augustus in 35 BC (see …

Dagalaifus

(63 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin)
[German version] Was appointed comes domesticorum by Julian in AD 361 (Amm. Marc. 21,8,1) and magister equitum by Jovian; in 364 he was influential in the elections of Jovian and Valentinian I (Amm. Marc. 25,5,2; Philostorgius 8,8). In 364-366 as magister peditum( equitum?) he fought against the Alemanni (Amm. Marc. 26,5,9), in 366 he was consul. PLRE 1, 239. Portmann, Werner (Berlin)

Dagan

(397 words)

Author(s): Pongratz-Leisten, Beate (Tübingen)
[German version] (Akkadian Dagān, Hebrew dāgōn, Greek Dagṓn [1]). The etymology of the word is unknown. Descriptions equating him with the Hurrite god Kumarbi, who is called halki ‘grain’, however also suggest an agrarian nature [2]; this is taken up again in Philo of Byblus who lists D. as the third of the four sons of Uranus and describes him as ‘Dagan who is wheat’ (Euseb. Praep. evang. 1,10,36b [3]). Attested in western Semitic mythology as the son of  El and father of  Baal, D. is one of the central deities of the we…

Dagisthaeus

(121 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] (Δαγισθαῖος; Dagisthaîos). As a young Roman commander D., who probably was of Gothic origin, unsuccessfully besieged Persian-occupied Petra in the area of the Lazi in AD 548/9 (Procop. Pers. 2,29 especially 33-43). On account of this he was later taken to court under Justinian on the charge of pro-Persian sentiments and arrested by the emperor (Procop. Goth. 4,9,1-4). For the Narses campaign to Italy he was released from custody and took part in the decisive battle against Totila a…

Dagon

(4 words)

see  Dagan

Dahae

(242 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Δάαι; Dáai, Δάοι; Dáoi; Latin: Dahae) The D. were a nomadic tribe in Persis; according to Strabo, they were originally one of the Scythian tribes in the region by the Caspian Sea (Str. 11,8,2; 11,9,2f.). Like the Mardi, Dropici and Sagartii, the D. are mentioned by Herodotus in connection with the revolt of Cyrus II against Astyages in 550 BC (Hdt. 1,125,4); in the Persepolis Inscription they are called Daha. The D. fought under Darius ─ and, after his death, under Spitamenes ─ against  Alexander [4] the Great (Arr. An. 3,11,3; 3,28,10; Curt. 4,12…

Dahistan

(53 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin)
[German version] Landscape on the lower  Atrek, western Turkmenia, named after the  Dahae. In the late Bronze and early Iron Age between 1500 and 600 BC, a well-developed irrigation culture with more than 30 attested settlements. Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) Bibliography P. L. Kohl, Central Asia, Palaeolithic Beginnings to the Iron Age, 1984, 200-208.

Daimachus

(173 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Δαίμαχος; Daímachos). [German version] [1] Historian from Plataeae, 4th cent. BC from Plataeae, Greek historian in the 4th cent. BC. He was the author of a contemporary history and was regarded by Jacoby, who can hardly have been correct in this regard, as the author of the Hellenica of Oxyrhynchus. FGrH 65 (with comm.). Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography F. Jacoby, The Autorship of the Hellenica of Oxyrhynchus, in: CQ 44, 1950, 1-11 S. Hornblower, in: Proc. of the Second Internat. Congr. of Boiotian Studies (1995; defends Jacoby) K. Meister, Die griech. Geschichtsschreibung,…

Daiphantus

(74 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] (Δαίφαντος; Daíphantos). Son of Bathyllios from Hyampolis. D. was one of the commanders of the Phocians in the clashes with the Thessalians shortly before the Persian Wars (Hdt. 8,27-31). The brilliant victory won by the Phocian army in these battles was still being commemorated in the home town of D. at the annual festival of the Elaphebolia in the time of Plutarch (Plut. Mor. 244B-C).  Elaphebolos;  Hyampolis Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)

Daitondas

(51 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] Bronze sculptor from Sicyon. He created victors' and portrait statues in Olympia and Thebes in the later 4th cent. BC, as well as one of Aphrodite in Delphi. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Lippold, 299 J. Marcadé, Recueil des signatures de sculpteurs grecs, 1, 1953, no.25 Overbeck, no. 1582 (sources).

Daktyloi Idaioi

(434 words)

Author(s): Caduff, Gian Andrea (Zizers)
[German version] (Δάκτυλοι Ἰδαῖοι; Dáktyloi Idaîoi). The three inventors of the blacksmith's craft described as góēs (‘magicians’) in the Phoronis (3) (PEG fr. 2; cf.Diod. Sic. 17,7,5; Str. 10,3,22) [1. 1054-5] (guild of mythical blacksmiths: [2. 269]). The same is attested not for the Troad (=Phrygia) but for Crete by Hes. cat. 282 M-W, Marmor Parium FGrH 239 A11 (Ephorus?) and Diod. Sic. 5,64,3;55,64,5 who describes them as the original people of Crete. Their name (‘fingers’) was traced back by Soph. fr. 366 TrG…

Daktylos

(162 words)

Author(s): Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
(δάκτυλος; dáktylos). [German version] [1] Measure of length The daktylos, Latin digitus, as a measure, is the term for the fingers' width, with four dáktyloi constituting a palm (παλαιστή; palaistḗ, Latin palmus), 16 daktyloi a foot (πούς; poús, Latin pes) and only in Greece 12 daktyloi making a span (σπιθαμή; spithamḗ). In Rome however the daktylos can also, according to the duodecimal system, be equated with the uncia and be counted up to the as (= pes). The guide for the daktylos is the foot that measures between 29.4 and 35.4 cm. It therefore fluctuates between 1.84 and…

Dalheim

(167 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] Roman vicus in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, possibly identical with Ricciacus (Tab. Peut.); Indications of a late La Tène period settlement ( c. 1st cent. BC). It was refounded as a road-station ( mansio) during the construction of the Metz-Trier road in the Augustan period [1]. After the uprising of the Treveri in AD 69/70 the town developed into the economic and particularly religious centre of the region (CIL 13,1,2 p. 635-638) [2; 3]; in the 2nd half of the 3rd cent. it was devastated by invasions of German…

Dalisandus

(52 words)

Author(s): Hild, Friedrich (Vienna)
[German version] (Δαλισανδός; Dalisandós). Name of several towns that lay in Cilicia Tracheia, presumably near Sinabıç [1], near Belören in Lycaonia [2] or in eastern Pamphylia [3]. Hild, Friedrich (Vienna) Bibliography 1 Hild/Hellenkemper, s.v. Dalisandos 2 D. H. French, The site of Dalisandus, in: EA 4, 1984, 85-98 3 J. Darrouzès, Notitiae episcopatuum Ecclesiae Constantinopolitanae, 1981.

Dalmatae, Dalmatia

(2,447 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana) | Niehoff, Johannes (Freiburg)
(Delmatae, Delmatia). [German version] I. General Important people of later Illyricum (degree of Celtization uncertain) in the hinterland of Salona between Tit(i)us (Krka) and Nestus/Hippius (Cetina) on the Glamočko, Livanjsko, Duvanjsko and Imotsko polje. Gave its name to the Roman prov. Dalmatia. Administratively separated from Illyricum at the beginning of the Flavian period. These areas were under the control of the Illyrian kingdom, notorious for its piracy (under the dynasty of the Ardiaeans, Agron and Teuta), which was fought by…

Dalmatica

(143 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Long-sleeved  tunica reaching down to the knees, named after its country of origin Dalmatia; mentioned in literature for the first time at the turn of the 2nd cent. AD. According to evidence from written sources and statues, the dalmatica was white with a purple   clavus that went vertically from the shoulders to the hem; the materials from which it was made were wool, silk, a half-silk and linen. The dalmatica was worn by men (with a cingulum militiae when on duty) and women. As early as the 3rd cent. AD it was adopted as liturgical church dress and became…

Dalmatius

(366 words)

Author(s): Bleckmann, Bruno (Strasbourg) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover)
[German version] [1] Fl. D. Half-brother of the Emperor Constantine I Son of  Constantius [1] and Theodora, half-brother of Constantine I. Nothing is known of his role in the initial period of Constantine's rule, although presumably he was given Toulouse as his abode during the tensions with Licinius in c. AD 320-324 (Auson. Prof. 16,11-12). Consul in 333, he was sent to Antioch at around the same time with the archaizing title of censor (Athan. c. Ar. 65,1ff.). There he was concerned with murder accusations against Athanasius. In Tarsus he had  Calocaerus burnt to d…

Damage, Indemnity

(386 words)

Author(s): Hengstl, Joachim (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] Damage is the loss suffered to property, or to a non-material item (e.g. honour) protected by law; indemnity is compensation for that loss. They are to be distinguished from forfeit, which has to do not with compensation for the damage but with punishment of the person who caused the damage and with appeasing the victim/plaintiff [1. 498-502; 6. 223-228]. Bound up in the concept of damage are the questions as to whether any additional expenses incurred and foregone profit are to b…

Damagetus

(107 words)

Author(s): Degani, Enzo (Bologna)
[German version] (Δαμάγητος; Damágētos). Mediocre epigrammatic poet of the ‘Garland’ of Meleager (Anth. Pal. 4,1,21), probably to be classified as part of the Peloponnesian School; he lived at the time of the war between the Achaean and the Aetolian Leagues (220-217 BC). Almost all of his 12 epigrams can be traced back directly (7,438; 541) or indirectly (praise of Sparta and its allies: 7,432; 540f., and in doricizing language 7,231; 16,1) to this event (perhaps also 6,277 to Arsinoe, the daughter…

Damania

(117 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] (name on Iberian coins [1. no. 86]: dmaniu) was an oppidum stipendiarium of the conventus of Caesaraugusta (Plin. HN 3,24) and part of the tribe of the Sedetani or Edetani (Ptol. 2,6,62); Hübner [2] presumes here that there were two different tribes while Schulten sees both as one (cf. [3. 229]). In spite of inscriptions (CIL II 2960; 3990; 4249) its position cannot be ascertained more exactly. Spanish local researchers have identified it as modern Mediana (province of Zaragoza), others as Domeño (province of Valencia) [4. 859]. Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography…

Damaratus

(262 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] (Δαμάρατος, Δημάρητος; Damáratos, Dēmárētos). Spartan king, Eurypontid, son and successor (around 510 BC) of King Ariston. The turning-point in his life was brought about by the enmity with Cleomenes I, whose intention to establish a Spartan satellite regime in Athens, with the help of an army campaign in 506 he thwarted at Eleusis (Hdt. 5,74f.). We do not know whether Athenian investigations became known to the Persian satrap in Sardeis [3. 273-276]. In 491 D. plotted against Cleome…

Damarete

(218 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Δαμαρέτη; Damarétē). [German version] [1] Wife of Gelon of Syracuse Daughter of Theron of Acragas and wife of Gelon of Syracuse, after his death wife of Polyzalus. Diod. Sic. (11,26,3) and the schol. 15 (29) to Pindar (Ol. 2) report that after the battle of Himera in 480 BC, D. spoke out in favour of making peace with the Carthaginians and treating them humanely. From the proceeds of the golden wreath weighing 100 talents which she received from them for her actions, she had so-called damareteia minted ─ commemorative coins ─ that each had a value of 10 Attic drachmas or 50 litrai (17 specimens…

Damas

(245 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald)
(Δάμας; Dámas). [German version] [1] Hero from Aulis Hero from Aulis who travelled to Troy with Arcesilaus and was killed there by Aeneas (Q. Smyrn. 8,303-305: Dymas? [1]). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 P. Vian, Q. Smyrn., 1966. [German version] [2] Eponymous founder of Damascus in Syria (Δαμᾶς; Damâs). Eponymous founder of  Damascus in Syria. He accompanied Dionysus to Asia where he established a shrine to him in Syria in the form of a hut (σκηνή), called Δαμᾶ σκηνή ( Damâ skēnḗ, ‘hut of Damas’), hence Damascus (Etym. m. s.v. Δαμσκός 247 Gaisford). Bloch, René (Berne) …

Damascius

(1,040 words)

Author(s): Brisson, Luc (Paris)
(Δαμάσκιος; Damáskios) [German version] A. Life Neoplatonist, last head of the  Academy in Athens, born around AD 462 in Damascus, studied rhetoric around 479/80 with a certain Theon in Alexandria and there also was a member of the Platonist circle. Around 482/3 he went to Athens to teach rhetoric. Around 491/2 he gave up this career and initially studied propaedeutic sciences under  Marinus, who had succeeded Proclus in 485, then philosophy under  Zenodotus. Around 515 Damascius returned to Athens to…

Damascus

(1,153 words)

Author(s): Klengel, Horst (Berlin) | Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
This item can be found on the following maps: Writing | Syria | Theatre | Caesar | Christianity | | Coloniae | Alexander | Commerce | Hasmonaeans | Hellenistic states | India, trade with | Mesopotamia | Phoenicians, Poeni | Pilgrimage [German version] A. Ancient Orient Oasis situated on the eastern edge of Antilebanon, watered by the undrained Barada, first mentioned in lists of Syrian towns of the pharaohs Thutmosis III and Amenophis III ( tmsq, Tamasqu) and then in the  Amarna letters ( Di/Dumašqu). In the 13th cent. BC too, D. was under Egyptian control. At the turn of the…

Damasia

(78 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Capital of the  Licates, a ‘polis rising up like a fortress’ (Str. 4,6,8). Tentatively identified with the early Imperial, fortified mountain settlement on the Auerberg (1055 m) near Bernbeuren (in modern Bavaria; finds of metal workshops and potters' ovens) that was settled by Rome in the 2nd decade AD and abandoned as early as c. AD 40. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography G. Ulbert, Auerberg, in: W. Czsyz, K. Dietz, Th. Fischer, H.-J. Kellner (ed.), Die Römer in Bayern, 1995, 417-419.

Damasias

(111 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] (Δαμασίας; Damasías). Athenian archon in 582/1 BC. He succeeded in remaining in office for longer than the usual term of a year. Only after a further 14 months could he be driven out of office by violent means. For the remainder of his period in office in 580/79 it is said that a working party of ten archons ruled, five of whom are said to have belonged to the eupatrídai, three to the agroikoí and two to the dēmiourgoí (Aristot. Ath. Pol. 13,2). It is disputed whether the assumption of this ‘archontate compromise’ is historically correct. Traill, PAA 300925.  Archontate Stein-Hö…

Damasichthon

(79 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Δαμασίχθων; Damasíchthōn). [German version] [1] One of the sons of Niobe One of the sons of  Niobe (Apollod. 3,45) who like his brothers is killed by Apollo (Ov. Met. 6,254-260). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography F. Bömer, Kommentar zu Ov. met. 6-7,1976, 78. [German version] [2] Son of the Athenian Codrus Son of the Athenian Codrus. Together with his brother Promethus, who later murdered him, he was the leader of the Ionian colony in Colophon (Paus. 7,3,3). Bloch, René (Berne)

Damasistratus

(26 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαμασίστρατος; Damasístratos). King of Plataeae who buried  Laius after he had been killed by Oedipus (Paus. 10,5,4; Apollod. 3,52). Bloch, René (Berne)

Damasithymus

(83 words)

Author(s): Högemann, Peter (Tübingen)
[German version] (Δαμασίθυμος; Damasíthymos). Dynast of Calynda in Caria. His father, Candaules, bore a name attested for Lydia. In 480 BC as taxiarch of a Carian fleet contingent, D. took part in Xerxes' campaign against Greece (Hdt. 7,98). He died in the sea battle of Salamis when Artemisia [1] of Halicarnassus sank his ship in order to avoid being pursued by an Athenian ship (Hdt. 8,87; Polyaenus, Strat. 8,53,2). Högemann, Peter (Tübingen) Bibliography J. Melber, in: Jahrbuch für Philologische Studien 14, 1885, 480-484.

Damastes

(44 words)

Author(s): Brodersen, Kai (Mannheim)
[German version] (Δαμάστης; Damástēs). Son of Dioxippus from Sigeum, Greek geographer and historian of the 5th cent. BC, probably a student of  Hellanicus (Agathemerus 1,1). With the exception of a few fragments, his works do not survive. Brodersen, Kai (Mannheim) Bibliography FGrH 5.

Damasus

(182 words)

Author(s): Frank, Karl Suso (Freiburg)
[German version] Bishop of Rome (pope), * 305, † AD 384, son of a priest of the Roman parish; his mother Laurentina was ordained as a widow after the death of her spouse [1. 10], a sister Irene lived as a virgin dedicated to God [1. 11]. Deacon from 355 onwards, he was chosen as bishop of Rome in 366 against stiff opposition (opposing bishop Ursinus). Violent fights arose between the two parties, in the course of which D. managed to assert his position over that of his opponents. During his term in office he single-mindedly advanced the pre-eminent position of the Roman bishop, th…

Dameas

(135 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] [1] (also: Demeas) Sculptor from Croton (also: Demeas). Sculptor from Croton. In 532 BC he created the victor's statue of Milon in Olympia that is described by Pausanias; there is a base with fragmentary inscriptions that is seen as going together with it. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Fuchs/Floren, 428 Loewy, no. 414 Overbeck, no. 484 (sources). [German version] [2] Bronze sculptor from Cleitor, c. 405 BC Bronze sculptor from Cleitor, student of Polycletus. In Delphi he created, for the victory statue of the Spartans who went to Aigosp…

Damghan

(176 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (Dāmġān). Town in Iran on the southern foothills of the Alborz, 342 km east of Teheran on the road to Nīšāpūr. The name possibly arose from the contraction of Deh-e Moġān (village of the Magi). The prehistoric antecedent of D. is Tepe Ḥeṣār with layers between the 5th millennium and the early 2nd millennium BC. After a hiatus of 1,500 years D. became the main settlement of the Parthian and Sassanid province of Qūmes, site of one of the holy state fires (ātaxš-ī xwarišnīh, ‘unfed f…

Damia

(5 words)

see  Charites;  Demeter

Damianus

(139 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
(Δαμιανός; Damianós). [German version] T. Flavius Damianus. Sophist from Ephesus Sophist from Ephesus, where he financed public and private buildings, among them a dining-hall and stoaí the length of one stadion (Philostr. VS 2,23). In three discussions before his death at the age of 70 ( c. AD 210?) he gave his student Philostratus the material for the biography of his teachers Aelius Aristides and Hadrianus of Tyre. As γραμματεύς ( grammateús) he housed Roman troops returning from the Parthian Wars in 166/7 (IK 17.1,3080) and in 170/1 honoured the proconsul Asiae Nonius Macrinus wit…

Damippus

(106 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (Δάμιππος; Dámippos). Spartan in the service of Hieronymus of Syracuse to whom he gave the advice of adherence to the alliance with Rome in 215 BC (Pol. 7,5,3). Later he also served Epicydes; in 212 he was sent as envoy to Philip V of Macedonia, and in the process fell into the hands of the Romans. The negotiations for his release, in the course of which M. Claudius [I 11] Marcellus noticed a tower that was only poorly guarded by the Syracusans, ultimately led to the successful Roman attack on Epipolae (Liv. 25,23,8ff.; Plut. Marcellus 18; Polyaenus, Strat. 8,11). Meier, Mischa…

Damnameneus

(32 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαμναμενεύς; Damnameneús). One of the  Daktyloi Idaioi who invented the technique of forging iron (Phoronis fr. 2,3 EpGF = fr. 2,3 PEG I; Str. 10,3,22). Bloch, René (Berne)
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