Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Damasistratus

(26 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαμασίστρατος; Damasístratos). King of Plataeae who buried  Laius after he had been killed by Oedipus (Paus. 10,5,4; Apollod. 3,52). Bloch, René (Berne)

Damasithymus

(83 words)

Author(s): Högemann, Peter (Tübingen)
[German version] (Δαμασίθυμος; Damasíthymos). Dynast of Calynda in Caria. His father, Candaules, bore a name attested for Lydia. In 480 BC as taxiarch of a Carian fleet contingent, D. took part in Xerxes' campaign against Greece (Hdt. 7,98). He died in the sea battle of Salamis when Artemisia [1] of Halicarnassus sank his ship in order to avoid being pursued by an Athenian ship (Hdt. 8,87; Polyaenus, Strat. 8,53,2). Högemann, Peter (Tübingen) Bibliography J. Melber, in: Jahrbuch für Philologische Studien 14, 1885, 480-484.

Damastes

(44 words)

Author(s): Brodersen, Kai (Mannheim)
[German version] (Δαμάστης; Damástēs). Son of Dioxippus from Sigeum, Greek geographer and historian of the 5th cent. BC, probably a student of  Hellanicus (Agathemerus 1,1). With the exception of a few fragments, his works do not survive. Brodersen, Kai (Mannheim) Bibliography FGrH 5.

Damasus

(182 words)

Author(s): Frank, Karl Suso (Freiburg)
[German version] Bishop of Rome (pope), * 305, † AD 384, son of a priest of the Roman parish; his mother Laurentina was ordained as a widow after the death of her spouse [1. 10], a sister Irene lived as a virgin dedicated to God [1. 11]. Deacon from 355 onwards, he was chosen as bishop of Rome in 366 against stiff opposition (opposing bishop Ursinus). Violent fights arose between the two parties, in the course of which D. managed to assert his position over that of his opponents. During his term in office he single-mindedly advanced the pre-eminent position of the Roman bishop, th…

Dameas

(135 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] [1] (also: Demeas) Sculptor from Croton (also: Demeas). Sculptor from Croton. In 532 BC he created the victor's statue of Milon in Olympia that is described by Pausanias; there is a base with fragmentary inscriptions that is seen as going together with it. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Fuchs/Floren, 428 Loewy, no. 414 Overbeck, no. 484 (sources). [German version] [2] Bronze sculptor from Cleitor, c. 405 BC Bronze sculptor from Cleitor, student of Polycletus. In Delphi he created, for the victory statue of the Spartans who went to Aigosp…

Damghan

(176 words)

Author(s): Leisten, Thomas (Princeton)
[German version] (Dāmġān). Town in Iran on the southern foothills of the Alborz, 342 km east of Teheran on the road to Nīšāpūr. The name possibly arose from the contraction of Deh-e Moġān (village of the Magi). The prehistoric antecedent of D. is Tepe Ḥeṣār with layers between the 5th millennium and the early 2nd millennium BC. After a hiatus of 1,500 years D. became the main settlement of the Parthian and Sassanid province of Qūmes, site of one of the holy state fires (ātaxš-ī xwarišnīh, ‘unfed f…

Damia

(5 words)

see  Charites;  Demeter

Damianus

(139 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
(Δαμιανός; Damianós). [German version] T. Flavius Damianus. Sophist from Ephesus Sophist from Ephesus, where he financed public and private buildings, among them a dining-hall and stoaí the length of one stadion (Philostr. VS 2,23). In three discussions before his death at the age of 70 ( c. AD 210?) he gave his student Philostratus the material for the biography of his teachers Aelius Aristides and Hadrianus of Tyre. As γραμματεύς ( grammateús) he housed Roman troops returning from the Parthian Wars in 166/7 (IK 17.1,3080) and in 170/1 honoured the proconsul Asiae Nonius Macrinus wit…

Damippus

(106 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (Δάμιππος; Dámippos). Spartan in the service of Hieronymus of Syracuse to whom he gave the advice of adherence to the alliance with Rome in 215 BC (Pol. 7,5,3). Later he also served Epicydes; in 212 he was sent as envoy to Philip V of Macedonia, and in the process fell into the hands of the Romans. The negotiations for his release, in the course of which M. Claudius [I 11] Marcellus noticed a tower that was only poorly guarded by the Syracusans, ultimately led to the successful Roman attack on Epipolae (Liv. 25,23,8ff.; Plut. Marcellus 18; Polyaenus, Strat. 8,11). Meier, Mischa…

Damnameneus

(32 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δαμναμενεύς; Damnameneús). One of the  Daktyloi Idaioi who invented the technique of forging iron (Phoronis fr. 2,3 EpGF = fr. 2,3 PEG I; Str. 10,3,22). Bloch, René (Berne)

Damnatio in crucem

(149 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] Latin   crux or damnatio in crucem (‘sentencing to crucifixion’), Greek during the Hellenistic period ἀνασταύρωσις/ anastaúrōsis (which, however, in Hdt. 3,125 and probably also in Xenophon [10] of Ephesos 4,2 means ‘impaling’) was only one of several ways of exacting the  death penalty (II) in the Roman empire. It probably originated as deterrence against slaves in the context of the   coercitio (‘power of coercion’) by the   tresviri [1] capitales. Damnatio in crucem was perhaps based on Oriental and Punic precedents. At the time of the crucifixion of…

Damnatio memoriae

(602 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] I. Historical Damnatio memoriae (DM) was the process of erasing from the (public) memory of a person (usually a Roman emperor) whose name and images are removed from public inscriptions and buildings. Underlying this measure was the religious assumption, widespread in the Roman-Hellenistic world, that meritorious rulers, like heroes, had come from the realm of the gods and returned there after their death (Cic. Rep., somnium Scipionis; Verg. Aen. 6,734ff.). If divine origin was not sufficiently evident in the successes, good deeds and virtues of…

Damnum

(809 words)

Author(s): Gamauf, Richard (Vienna)
[German version] A. Meaning Originally ‘expenditure’, ‘loss of assets’; in legal usage ‘damage’. According to Roman law, only material loss can be counted as a replaceable damnum. Unlawful interference with other legal rights, e.g. insult or physical injury of a free Roman, are, to the Roman view, not assessable in monetary terms ( liberum corpus non recipit aestimationem, Gaius Dig. 9,1,3). In these cases the victim may possibly be allowed an actio iniuriarum which is not meant to provide compensation for damages but to make amends through the payment of a fine (  iniuria ). Gamauf, Rich…

Damocharis

(105 words)

Author(s): Degani, Enzo (Bologna)
[German version] (Δαμοχάρις; Damocháris). Epigrammatic poet of the Justinianic period, grammatikós, friend and student of Agathias (according to the lemma of Anth. Pal. 7,206, a tomb epigram on the partridge loved by the master, cf. Agathias 7,204f.). Born on Cos, as can be seen from the epitaph of Paulus Silentiarius (7,588), he was proconsul and governor of Asia and was especially venerated both in Smyrna (cf. the anonymous poem 16,43) and in Ephesus (cf. SEG 18,474). Four epigrams of average standard from the ‘Cycle’ of Agathias are extant. Degani, Enzo (Bologna) Bibliography Av. un…

Damocles

(90 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
[German version] (Δαμοκλῆς; Damoklês). Courtier and sycophant of the tyrant  Dionysius [1] I (according to Timaeus FGrH 566 F 32 of Dionysius II). The anecdote of the ‘sword of Damocles’ became famous through Cicero (Tusc. 5,61f.): as D. considered the powerful and rich tyrant to be the happiest person in the world, the latter had a sumptuous meal prepared for him but above his head had a sword suspended on a horse hair in order to demonstrate to him the true ‘happiness’ of a tyrant. Meister, Klaus (Berlin)

Damocrates

(60 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
(Δαμοκράτης; Damokrátēs).   [German version] (M.?) Servilius D. Freedman of M. Servilius ( cos. ord. AD 3) whose daughter he cured (Plin. HN 24,7,28). Under Nero and Vespasian he wrote prescriptions in iambic trimeters in the didactic tradition of  Apollodorus [7]; some of these are extant in  Galen. Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) Bibliography Edition: F. Cats Bussemaker, Poetae bucolici et didactici, 1862.

Damocritus

(82 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Δαμόκριτος/ Damókritos; also: Democritus [Δημόκριτος/ Dēmókritos]). Sculptor from Sicyon, active during the first half of the 4th cent. BC. Pausanias saw a victor's statue of his in Olympia. Pliny chose the Attic form of the name, for a Democritus, who made statues of philosophers. In Rome his name was found on the statue of Lysis from Miletus in a lost collection of copies of 4th cent. works. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Overbeck, no. 463, 466-468 (sources) Loewy, no. 484 Lippold, 247-248.

Damon

(975 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Riedweg, Christoph (Zürich) | Harmon, Roger (Basle)
(Δάμων; Dámōn) [German version] [1] Prince of the Telchines Prince of the  Telchines. Father-in-law of Minos and ancestor of Miletus. When the Telchines were struck dead by lightning by Jupiter because they poisoned crops, D. and his family were spared in gratitude for hospitality provided. Only his daughter Macelo and her husband were among the victims (Nic. in the schol. Ov. Ib. 475). Bloch, René (Berne) [German version] [2] Pythagorean from Syracuse A Pythagorean from Syracuse, friend of Phintias, for whom he stood surety with his life. According to Aristoxenus (…

Damophilus

(178 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Δαμόφιλος; Damóphilos). [German version] [1] Coroplast and painter, c. 493 BC Coroplast and painter, probably from Magna Graecia. Together with Gorgasos he decorated the Temple of Ceres in Rome (493 BC) with murals and terracotta pediment figures and added artist's epigrams. Later renovations preserved both of these. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Fuchs/Floren, 427, 440 Overbeck, no. 616, 1647 (sources) I. Scheibler, Griech. Malerei der Ant., 1994. [German version] [2] Rich property owner from Enna 136 BC Rich property owner from Enna, who treated the slaves i…

Damophon

(190 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Δαμοφῶν; Damophôn) Sculptor from Messene. Based on prosopographic and historic evidence, it would seem that he was active from the end of the 3rd cent. BC until 168 BC; most of his divine statues known from written records must have been produced in Arcadia prior to the earthquake in 183 BC. He worked on colossal acroliths and was entrusted with the repair of Phidias' Zeus in  Olympia. Of a group of gods in the Asclepius shrine in Messene, the head and foot of the statues of Apollo…
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