Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Damostratus

(74 words)

Author(s): Degani, Enzo (Bologna)
[German version] (Δαμόστρατος; Damóstratos). Author of an epigram on Meleager's ‘Garland’ (Anth. Pal. 9,328): a ‘Damostratus, son of Antilas’ (v. 3) dedicates wooden statues and boar skins to the Naiads. The attribution seems questionable as does the very existence of the otherwise unknown author (D. of Apamea, author of Halieutiká (Ἁλιευτικά), dates from a time post-Meleager, i.e. after the first half of the first cent. BC). Degani, Enzo (Bologna) Bibliography GA I,1,80; 2,230f.

Damoxenus

(82 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen)
[German version] (Δαμόξενος; Damóxenos). Attic comedic author of the 3rd cent. BC, known to have been victorious at the Dionysia once [1. Testimonia 2]. There is evidence for two plays. His Σύντροφοι contains the longest speech by a cook preserved in a comedy (fr. 2: 68 verses); the speaker presents himself as a disciple of Democritus and more especially of Epicurus and is scornful of everyone who is not, even the Stoics. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG V, 1986, 1-7.

Dan

(440 words)

Author(s): Köckert, Matthias (Berlin)
(Hebr. Dān, Greek Δάν; Dán, in Ios. Δάνα, Δάνος; Dána, Dános). [German version] [1] Son of Jacob Son of Jacob and eponym of an Israelite tribe (Gen. 30,1-6), which eventually settled near the city of Laish/Leshem, which was then renamed after the tribe (Judg. 18,2-9; Jos. 19,40-48). Köckert, Matthias (Berlin) [German version] [2] City at the foot of Mt Hermon City at the foot of Mt Hermon, 20 km north of Lake Hule, identified with Tall al-Qāḍı̄ at the central source of the Jordan on the basis of a Greek-Aramaic bilingual inscription (3rd/2nd cents. BC) a…

Danacia

(19 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] D. Quartilla Aureliana Wife of the senator Aiacius (AE 1968, 518, 523). Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Danae

(243 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
[German version] (Δανάη; Danáē). Mythical daughter of  Acrisius, the king of Argus, and Euridice or Aganippe (Hom. Il. 14,319f.; Hes. fr. 129; 135MW; Hyg. Fab. 63). She was imprisoned by her father to keep her from any contact with the outside world following a pronouncement by the oracle that he would be killed by his grandson. Zeus approached D. in the form of a shower of gold and she became pregnant with  Perseus (Pind. Pyth. 10,44f.; 12,9ff.; Soph. Ant. 944ff.; Isocr. 10,59; Ov. Met. 4,610f.). …

Danai

(268 words)

Author(s): Schaffner, Brigitte (Basle)
[German version] (Δαναοί; Danaoí). Middle Helladic ethnic group [1] of uncertain etymology; mentioned in Egypt in the 14th cent. BC on the base of the monument to Amenophis III in Karnak as Danaia ( tniw) in connection with the Argolid/Peloponnese [2], possibly also connected with the Danuna belonging to the sea peoples, who were conquered by Ramses III in 1190 BC [3]. Used in the Homeric epics as a metric variant, as are ‘Argeioi’ and  ‘Achaean’, to describe the Greek population as a whole (e.g. Il. 9,34ff.; 9,370f.) [4]. Following the sam…

Danais

(39 words)

Author(s): Selzer, Christoph (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] (Δαναίς; Danaís) or Danaídes (Δαναίδες; Danaides). The title of a 6,500 hexameter epic dealing with the fate of the  Danaids and their flight from the sons of Aigyptos to Argus. Selzer, Christoph (Frankfurt/Main) Bibliography EpGF 141.

Danake

(105 words)

Author(s): Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] (δανάκη; danákē). In ancient written sources (Hsch. 219; Poll. 9,82 i.a.) the danake is a silver Persian coin ─ the name derives from danak ─ which weighed slightly more than an Attic obolós ( c. 0.9g). Together with the silver half- danake (ἡμιδανάκιον; hēmidanákion), the danake should probably be linked to coins from Sidon (1/16 shekel) and Aradus, as a provincial coinage, since the coins are mainly found in the Levant. The danake was occasionally used as an obolos for the dead.  Charon's fare;  Obolos;  Siqlu Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover) Bibliography F. Hultsch, …

Danaus, Danaids

(828 words)

Author(s): Auffarth, Christoph (Tübingen)
[German version] (Δαναός, Δαναίδες; Danaós, Danaídes). Having quarrelled with his twin brother Aigyptos, according to the myth D. flees Egypt with his 50 daughters (the Danaids) for the Argolis and is given asylum there (Aesch. Supp. 1; Danaids TrGF 3 fr. 43-46; T 70 [1; 2]). However, the 50 sons of Aigyptos pursued the girls to Argos and wanted to force marriage on them. D. persuaded his daughters to pretend to go through with this, but then to decapitate the bridegrooms on the wedding night. Only o…

Dance

(2,153 words)

Author(s): Hausleiter | Harmon, Roger (Basle)
[German version] I. Egypt and Ancient Orient As in all ancient culture, dance played an important role in the Ancient Orient as well as in Egypt; the documentary evidence for the latter, however, is incomparably better, both in pictures and in texts ─ there was hardly a part of life not involving dance: dances accompanied ‘rites of passage’ were magic-apotropaic, ecstatic, worshipful, amusing-entertaining, and even eroticizing. Children, women, and men danced together in separate groups; alongside, the…

Dance

(2,287 words)

Author(s): Schulze, Christian (Bochum) | Schulze, Janine
Schulze, Christian (Bochum) [German version] A. Subject area/Overview (CT) The reception of Greek Antiquity in dance reached its acme at the beginning of the 20th cent. in Europe and the U.S.A. The first studies of movement, undertaken as early as the end of the 19th cent., drew on the classical Greek body image. In 1885, the American G. Stebbins published her theory of movement [25] which was based on the system of motion pedagogy (aesthetic calisthenics) developed by F. Delsarte. Delsarte linked the id…

Dandamis

(353 words)

Author(s): Muckensturm-Poulle, Claire (Besançon)
[German version] An Indian sage, who is supposed to have come into contact with Greeks at the beginning of 326 BC, when Alexander's army was encamped in Taxila. The Greeks with whom he had contact were either anonymous scouts (according to Megasthenes in Str. 15,1,68 and Arr. Anab. 7,2,2-4, according to Onesicritus in Str. 15,1,64-65, the name Mandanis is mentioned here; Plut. Alexander 65,1-3), or Onesicritus and Alexander himself (as per PGenev. 271 [1; 2], the basis is the 2nd section of the Pa…

Daneion

(318 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (δάνειον; dáneion). The  loan, limited assignment of fungible goods (in kind or money) was an everyday way of doing business throughout the regions inhabited by the Greeks. It took place between private individuals as well as in public life. The lenders were often banks or temples and the borrowers often states, which often also owed debts to private individuals (e.g. IG VII 3172: Orchomenus is indebted to Nicareta). This practise was generally known as daneion, but sometimes   chrḗsis was used; the   eranos loan is a special type. The daneion was set up with a fixed r…

Dantheletae

(289 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Δανθηλῆται/ Danthēlêtai; also Dentheleti). Thracian tribe inhabiting the area around the upper reaches of the  Strymon and the area to the west reaching as far as Axius. Earliest mention was by Theopompus (FGrH 115 F 221) for 340/339 BC. Philip V twice laid waste to their territory on his Thracian campaigns (184 and 181 BC: Liv. 39,53,12; 40,22,9; Pol. 23,8,4). In 88 BC, the D. acted as allies of Rome in the quelling of a Macedonian revolt. They attacked this province in 86/5 together with the Maedi, Dardani and Scordisci. In 57 and 56, the proconsul of Macedonia, L. Cal…

Danuvius

(6 words)

(Danube) see  Ister [2]

Daochus

(157 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
(Δάοχος; Dáochos). [German version] [1] D.I. Tagos of the Thessalian koinon 431-404 BC from Pharsalus, son of Agias, was the   tagos of the Thessalian koinon for 27 years ( c. 431-404 BC?); his tageia was reputedly a time of peace and prosperity (Syll.3 273) [1. 110f.]. Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) [German version] [2] D. II. Thessalian, envoy of Philip II 338 BC high-ranking Thessalian, grandson of D. [1]. In 338 BC, Philip II sent him together with others to the Thebans to procure support against Athens (Pol. 18,4,4; Dem. Or. 18,211…

Daorsi

(450 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] An ‘Illyrian’ civitas with only 17 decuriae in the conventus of Narona (prov. of Dalmatia, today in Bosnia Herzegovina and partly in Croatia), one of the most Hellenized peoples on the coast of Dalmatia. The D. settled on the left bank of the Naro (Neretva) from Bijelo polje as far as Trebinjska Šuma, i.e. in the hinterland between Narona and  Epidaurum, with access to the sea and a central settlement in Gradina near Ošanići in the region of Stolac (Herzegovina), built according to megalithic t…

Daphitas

(234 words)

Author(s): Montanari, Franco (Pisa)
[German version] (Δαφίτας; Daphítas, also Δαφίδας; Daphídas). Greek grammarian (‘sophist’ according to Val. Max. 1,8), probably from the 2nd cent. BC, if it is accepted that he lived at the same time as Attalus III (see below). The Suda (δ 99 s.v. Δαφίδας) says that he came from Telmessus in Caria and made claims in a work about Homer that the poet was not telling the truth because the Athenians did not take part in the expedition to Troy. Strabo (14,647) tells that D. was crucified on Mt Thorax near …

Daphnae

(119 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Colonization Egyptian city on the edge of the East Delta, today known as Tall Dafana (Egyptian Ṯbn?). According to Hdt. 2,30, it was a border fortress of  Psametichus I; archaeological discoveries dating from the New Kingdom, the 26th Dynasty and later, including fortifications, weapons and Greek ceramics. It is possible that it could also have been one of the stratópeda of Greek and Carian mercenaries mentioned in Hdt. 2,154. It is disputed as to whether it is the same as the OT Thachpanches. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) Bibl…

Daphnaeus

(121 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Bloch, René (Berne)
(Δαφναῖος; Daphnaîos). [German version] [1] Strategos in Syracus 406 BC Strategos in Syracuse, was supposed to relieve Acragas in 406 BC when it was besieged by the Carthaginians, but this went wrong, apparently because of his corruption (Diod. Sic. 13,86,4ff.). This failure led to the removal from office of the group of commanders, the appointment of  Dionysius [1] as an authorized strategos and thereby to the latter's tyrannis. Dionysius killed D. in 405 (Diod. Sic. 13,96,3). Meister, Klaus (Berlin) [German version] [2] Epiclesis of Apollo Epiclesis of Apollo (Anth. Pal. 9,477…
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