Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Gaieochos

(125 words)

Author(s): Visser, Edzard (Basle)
[German version] (γαιήοχος; Gaiēochos). Ep. epithet meaning ‘earth shaker’, used in Homer as a metric substitute or complimentary cognomen for Poseidon (especially in conjunction with γαιήοχος ἐννοσίγαιος; gaiēochos ennosígaios). Only late antique texts extend the reference of gaieochos beyond Poseidon to Zeus (Opp. Hal. 1,74) and Oceanus (Quint. Smyrn. 2,208). In antiquity, it was generally understood as a composite of γαῖα and ἔχειν (etymologically not tenable) or ὀχεῖσθαι (either in the form of the earth carrying Poseidon as a r…

Gainas

(235 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] Tervingian Goth of low birth, Arian. Recruited by Theodosius I in AD 378, he led eastern troops to support Arcadius in Constantinople as comes rei militaris (for his military career, see Socr. 6,6,2; Sozom. Hist. eccl. 8,4,1), at the order of  Stilicho, after Theodosius' victory over Eugenios in 394. As Stilicho's confidant, he was involved in the death of  Rufinus in 399 ([1. 107,99], Zos. 5,7,4; Philostorgius 11,3, Iohannes Antiochenus 190 FHG 4,610). In 399, he was elevated to magister utriusque militiae, and was sent by  Eutropius to Phrygia against the r…

Gaiso

(110 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Johne, Klaus-Peter (Berlin)
[German version] [1] AD 350 possibly magister militum of the usurper Magnentius In AD 350, possibly as magister militum of the usurper Magnentius, he pursued the fleeing emperor Constans, and killed him during his arrest in the Pyrenean town of Helena ([Aur. Vict.] Epit. Caes. 41,23; Zos. 2,42,5). In 351, he was consul together with Magnentius (Chron. min. 1, 69 Mommsen). PLRE 1, 380. Portmann, Werner (Berlin) [German version] [2] Official under Honorius AD 409 Comes sacrarum largitionum under Honorius probably in AD 409, and comes et magister officiorum in 410 (Cod. lust. 4,61,12…

Gaius

(1,171 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Fröhlich, Roland (Tübingen)
[II] Widespread Roman praenomen (probably connected with the Latin family name Gavius, but not related to gaudere), abbreviated as C., more rarely G.; in late Greek inscriptions also Γα ( Ga). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [1] Physician of the school of Herophilus Physician of the school of Herophilus, probably 1st cent. BC or AD, wrote about hydrophobia (Caelius Aurelianus morb. ac. 3,113-4). He explained that this disease affected the brain as well as the meninges, because the nerves surrounding the stomach and responsi…

Gaius

(153 words)

Author(s): Baltes, Matthias (Münster) | Lakmann, Marie-Luise (Münster)
[German version] [I] (Γάϊος; Gáïos). Platonic philosopher of the early 2nd cent. AD. The physician  Galen studied with two of his students [3. 34f.]. No works are extant. His commentary on the myth of  Er [1. 18, 205] and his comments on Plato's dual teaching methods [1. 213; 2.98, 357ff.] were most likely part of (lost) lecture notes taken by his student  Albinus [1. 28, 182ff.]. He was held in high regard particularly by Plotinus, Porphyrius, and Priscian; Proclus saw him as one of the great autho…

Gaizatorix

(97 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Γαιζατόριξ, Γεζατόριος; Gaizatórix, Gezatórios). Celtic name, ‘lord of the Gaesati (spear bearers)’ [2. 215]. Leader of the Galates, who in 180 BC together with  Cassignatus approached Eumenes II for help against  Pharnaces of Pontus. Eumenes refused, as the Galates had previously sided with the latter (Pol. 24,14; 25,2). A region in western Paphlagonia may also have been named after G. (Str. 12,3,41). Regarding a forged silver coin of the ‘Boian king’ Gesatorix, see [1. 77-79]. Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 R. Göbl, Typologie und Chronolo…

Galaad

(309 words)

Author(s): Kutsch, Ernst (Vienna)
(Γαλαάδ; Galaád, LXX, Eus.), Gilead (Hebrew gilad). [German version] [1] Town in eastern Jordan Town in eastern Jordan (Judg. 10:17; Hos. 6:8; 12:12), the modern Ḫirbat Ǧalad south of the Jabboq 10 km north-northeast of as-Salṭ, on the homonymous mountain range (Gen. 31:21, et al.: hăr [hăg]gilad, modern Ǧabal Ǧalad) (cf. Euseb. On. 62,1f.). Kutsch, Ernst (Vienna) [German version] [2] Area east of the Jordan Region east of the Jordan (LXX alongside Γ. also Γαλαδ[ε]ῖτις; Galad[e]ītis; Jos. Ant. Iud. 1,324 et al. Γαλαδηνή; Galadēnē; 5,164 et al., Γαλα[α]δῖτις; Gala[a]dītis; 12,3…

Galactophagi

(86 words)

Author(s): Ungefehr-Kortus, Claudia (Alten-Buseck)
[German version] (Γαλακτοφάγοι / Galaktophágoi, ‘milk eaters’) are fist mentioned in Hom. Il. 13,5f. together with the Hippemolgi (‘mare-milkers’) and  Abii as neighbours of the Thracians. Ancient literature offers three different views on the identity of the G.: 1. G., Hippemolgi, and Abii as three fabulous tribes who live on the edge of the inhabited world (Str. 7,3,7; 12,3,27). 2. G. and Hippemolgi as Scythian or Sarmatian nomadic tribes (Str. 7,3,7-9), or 3. G. as a real, geographically locatable Scythian tribe (Ptol. 6,14,12). Ungefehr-Kortus, Claudia (Alten-Buseck)

Galaei

(104 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
[German version] (Γαλαῖοι; Galaîoi). The G., who appear in the Athenian tribute lists from 436/435 BC, were the citizens of a town on the western coast of Sithonia, close to the modern Neos Marmaras, referred to by Herodotus (Hdt. 7,122), probably erroneously, as Galepsos in his description of Xerxes' campaign. In 432, the G. seceded from Athens and resettled in the enlarged city of Olynthus, but their town was recaptured by Athens before 425, and declared independent in the peace of Nicias of 421. After that, the sources no longer mention it. Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel) Bibliography M. Zahrnt,…

Galaesus

(71 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] River, also known as Eurotas (Pol. 8,35,8), 40 stades (Pol. loc. cit.) or 5 miles (Liv. 25,11,8) from Tarentum. In 212 BC, Hannibal built a camp on its banks. Mentioned in Virgil (Georg. 4,12,6), Horace (Carm. 2,6,10), and Propertius (2,34,67). Its water is praised as particularly suited for the washing of wool (Mart. 2,43,3; 4,28,3; 5,37,2; 8,28,3; 12,63,6; Stat. Silv. 3,3,93). Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) Bibliography Nissen 2, 870.

Galanthis

(4 words)

see  Galinthias

Galaria

(129 words)

Author(s): Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata)
[German version] Town of the Siculi, localized by Rizzo [1. 67] near the Sicilian S. Mauro di Caltagirone. Only mentioned by Diodorus twice: in the context of the battle against the Carthaginians alongside  Entella in 334 BC (Diod. Sic. 16,67,3) and in the context of the 312/311 BC revolt against Agathocles (Diod. Sic. 19,104). Archaeological finds: rare silver lítrai, originating from the area north-west of Mineo (cf. [2. 84-87; 3. 36-39]). Manganaro, Giacomo (Sant' Agata li Battiata) Bibliography 1 G. E. Rizzo, Monete greche di Sicilia, 1946 2 K. Jenkins, in: Atti di IV Con…

Galata

(84 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Small island off the north African coast between Karalis and Thabraca (modern Tabarka), formed from volcanic rocks, modern Galita. Source references: Mela 2,120; Plin. HN 3,92; 5,42; 35,202; Ptol. 4,3,44 (Καλάθη; Kaláthē); It. Ant. 494,7-495,1; 514,4-8 (providing some wrong distances); Tab. Peut. 3,4; Liber generationis, Chron. min. 1, p. 103,134; 109,212; Liber genealogus, Chron. min. 1, p. 168,165; Mart. Cap. 6,645; Geogr. Rav. p. 102,1. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography J. Toutain, Note sur l'île de la Galite, in: MEFRA 11, 1891, 454-456.

Galatea

(385 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
(Γαλατεία; Galateía). [German version] [1] Nereid Nereid, daughter of  Nereus and  Doris (Hom. Il. 18,45; Hes. Theog. 250; Apollod. 1,11), whose name probably refers to the milky-white colour, i.e. either to sea-foam or milk in its important role in pasture farming (Lucian 14,3; Eust. 1131,5 ad Hom. Il. 18,42). In Sicily, G. was venerated as the protector of herds (Duris FGrH 76 F 58). The love story between the Cyclops  Polyphemus and G. also originates from Sicily (Prop. 3,2,7f.; Nonnus, Dion. 39,25…

Galates

(56 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (ὁ Γαλάτης; Galátēs). Plut. Phocion 33,4 mentions G. as the then current name for the Acrurium mountains, part of the  Callidromus range, on whose southern slopes Phocion and Polyperchon met in 318 BC. The change of name is perhaps linked to the invasion by the Celts in 279 BC. Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)

Galatia

(1,808 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
I. Region [German version] A. Definition Region in central Anatolia; it received its ethnically derived name following the conquest, settlement, and formation of states by the Celtic  Tolistobogii,  Tectosages, and  Trocmi, thus replacing the older names for its constituent regions (Phrygia, Cappadocia). Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) [German version] B. Geography Before 188 BC, the tribal states of G. included, in the north, peripheral areas of  Paphlagonia and the territory of the  Mariandyni (basins of Bolu and Gerede), the zone ─ rich in woodl…

Galaxaure

(68 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
[German version] (Γαλαξαύρη; Galaxaúrē).  Oceanid, mentioned in Hes. Theog. 353 (alongside Plexaure) and in H. Hom. 5,423 (based on that Orph. Fr. 49,26) where she picks flowers with Persephone when the latter is abducted by Hades. The etymology of the name is uncertain (for hypotheses see [1; 2]). Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen) Bibliography 1 E. Maass, Aglaurion, in: MDAI(A) 35, 1910, 338 2 P. Kretschmer, Mythische Namen, in: Glotta 10, 1920, 51ff.

Galaxia

(71 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (τὰ Γαλάξια; tà Galáxia). Athenian festival in honour of the mother of the gods, named after the milk gruel served on the occasion (Hsch. s.v. G.). The importance of the festival is indicated by the evidence provided by ephebic inscriptions, that in the Hellenistic period the epheboi offered sacrifices for the goddess and dedicated a golden bowl to her (from IG II1 470,13). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)

Galba

(956 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] King of the  Suessiones and commander-in-chief of the coalition of Belgic tribes against Caesar in 57 BC. Following his victory over the Belgae and the capture of  Noviodunum, the main town of the Suessiones, Caesar took two of G.'s son as hostages (Caes. B Gall. 2,4,7; 2,13,1; Cass. Dio 39,1,2). ‘Galba’ appears frequently as a cognomen of the Roman gens Sulpicia, but its Celtic origin (Suet. Galba 3,1) is not certain [1. 1621ff.; 2. 349-350]. Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Holder 1 2 Evans. [German version] [2] Rom. emperor AD 68-9 Roman emperor f…

Galea

(4 words)

see  Armour
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