Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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L.

(55 words)

Author(s): Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] Abbreviation of the Roman praenomen Lucius. In the Roman numbering system, L denotes the value 50 and probably developed from the bisection of the Greek aspirate Θ (via the form , which found no use as a letter in the early Latin alphabet). Italy, alphabetical scripts; Numerical systems …

Laarchus

(114 words)

Author(s): Patzek, Barbara (Wiesbaden)
[German version] (Λάαρχος; Láarchos; Hdt.: Λέαρχος; Léarchos). Son of Battus [2] II. of Cyrene. L. fought together with unnamed brothers over their succession against their brother Arcesilaus [2] II. of Cyrene. L…

Labaca

(37 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Fischer, Klaus (Bonn)
[German version] (Λάβακα; Lábaka). According to Ptol. 7,1,46, city in north-west India, in the land of the Pandoi (probably Old Indian Pāṇḍava). Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Fischer, Klau…

Labae

(106 words)

Author(s): Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Λάβαι; Lábai: Pol. 13,9.; Steph. Byz.). City on the north-east coast of Arabia in the Gerrhaean coastal area of Chattēnía (Arabic al-Ḫaṭṭ), south of al-Qaṭīf and opposite Bahrein. Their ethnicon is Labaíoi, and probably with a conjecture of g to l the Gabaíoi (Str. 16,4,4) are indicated here, who as merchants travelled from their capital Gerrha to Hadramaut in 40 days. Arab geographers of the Middle Ages also mention Laʿbā as the name of salt pans along the coast of that region. Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography H. v. Wissmann, Zur Kenntnis von Ostarabien…

Labarum

(209 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge ( Pons Milvius) against Maxentius in AD 312, in a dream described as a vision, Constantine I was advised to have the first two letters of the name of Christ, in Greek chi and rho (Χ and Ρ), inscribed on the shields of his soldiers, if he wished victory: τούτῳ νίκα (‘By this sign be victorious’; cf. Lactant. De mort. pers. 44; Euseb. Vita Const. 1,26-31). This Christogram was later fixed to the tip of a standard consisting of a long lance with a flag bearing the Imperial medallion hung on a crosspiece. It is unclear whether the name labarum given to this standard was of Latin, Greek of Celtic origin. The labarum which was later often depicted on coins, particularly in conjunction with the Spes publica ( Spes) (RIC 7, 1966, 572, 19), was of religious rather than tactical value. It was entrusted to a guard commanded by praepositi from the ranks of the domestici ( domesticus ) (Cod. Theod. 6,25,1 of AD 416). Ensigns/Standards Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Biblio…

Labda

(138 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] (Λάβδα; Lábda). Daughter of the Bacchiad Amphion of Corinth. According to Herodotus (5,92), L. was lame and therefore could not find a husband in the strictly endogamous circle of nobility of the Bacchiadae. Therefore she was said to have married Eëtion from the deme of Petra who did not belong this circle. As there had been a prophecy even before the birth of their son Cypselus [2] that he would rule over Corinth, the Bacchiadae were said to have planned his murder. The tradition available to Herodotus says that L. succeeded in hiding the child in a kypsélē (‘chest’) thus saving him (cf. Nicolaus of Damascus, FGrH 90 F 57). Cypselus Chest Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne) Bibliography H. Berve, Die Tyrannis bei den Griechen, 1967, 1, 15f.; 2, 522f.; J. B. Salmon, Wealthy Corinth, 1984, 186ff.

Labdacids

(4 words)

see Labdacus

Labdacus

(115 words)

Author(s): Zingg, Reto (Basle)
[German version] (Λάβδακος; Lábdakos). Son of the Theban king Polydorus and Nicteis. Link in the line of descent from Cadmus, the father of Polydorus, to Laius, the father of Oedipus. He is supposed to have waged a border war against Pandion and was punished with death for scorning Dionysus (Hdt. 5,59; Eur. Phoen. 8; Apollod. 3,40; 193; Paus. 9,5,5). He neither had a cult nor a known relationship to a particular place. In popular etymology, L. was known as ‘the limper’, based on the shape of the letter la(m)bda with its one shorter leg. This is Oedipus projected onto his ancestor [1]. Zingg, Ret…

Labdalum

(95 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Falco, Giulia (Athens)
[German version] (Λάβδαλον; Lábdalon). Site at the northern rim of the Epipolai-Plateau of Syracusae, where a fortress was built by the Athenians in 414 BC. This was taken from them by Gylippus shortly after his arrival (Thuc. 6,97,5; 98,2; 7,3,4). Fabricius located it east of Scala Greca, above the descent of the antique roadway Syracusae - Megara from the plateau. Before him, it was thought to lie more to the west. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Falco, Giulia (Athens) Bibliography K. Fabricius, Das ant. Syrakus (Klio-Beih. 28), 1932, 19f. H.-D. Drögemüller, Syrakus, 1968, 15f., fi…

Labeates

(139 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] Illyrian people (Liv. 43,19,3; 31,2; 44,31,10; 32,3; 45,26,15: Labeatae; the region in Liv. 44,23,3: Labeatis; Pol. 29,3,5: Λαβεᾶτις) near palus Labeatis/ lacus Labeatum (Liv. 44,31,3/10; modern Albanian Liqeni Shkodres, Serbian Skadarsko jezero); main towns Scodra and Meteon. Their territory was the core of the kingdom of Genthius, the last independent Illyrian king and an ally of Perseus, who was defeated by the Romans in 168 BC. The Romans gave them autonomy and the right to issue coinage (bronze c…

Labeo

(87 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen, derived from labea, ‘lip’, originally denoting ‘the thick-lipped one’ (Plin. HN 11, 159); in the Republican period cognomen in families of the Antistii ([I 13]: the L. frequently mentioned in Cicero's correspondence [II 3] is the famous law expert), Atinii ([I 6 - 7]), Fabii ([I 20]) and Segulii; widespread in the Imperial period, among others nickname of the writer Cornelius [II 19] L. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina, 118; 238 J. Reichmuth, Die lat. Gentilizia, 1956, 70 Walde/Hofmann 1, 738.

Laberia

(65 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] L. Marcia Hostilia Crispina Moecia Cornelia. Daughter of Laberius [II 3] Maximus, cos. II AD 103, and second wife of C. Bruttius [II 4] Praesens, cos. II in 139. L. accompanied her husband to Africa during his time as proconsul there (CIL VIII 110); her estates were near Amiternum and Trebula Mutuesca (Raepsaet-Charlier, no. 478). PIR2 L 15. Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Laberius

(821 words)

Author(s): Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Plebeian nomen gentile of Etruscan origin, more frequent references only towards the end of the Republic. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] L. Military tribune 258 BC Military tribune during the First Punic War, in 258 BC he secured the retreat of consul A. Atilius [I 14] Calatinus (Claudius Quadrigarius fr. 42 HRR) near Camarina. All 400 legionaries of L. were killed, he himself survived badly wounded, but nevertheless was celebrated as ‘The Leonidas of Rome’ (Gell. NA 3,7,21). Other war heroes mentioned are: Q.…

Labici

(113 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Tribus City in Latium on the north-eastern slopes of the Alban Hills, modern Monte Compatri. Member of the Latin League; in Roman wars against the Aequi allied with the latter and destroyed by Q. Servilius Priscus (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 5,61; 8,19); a Roman colony from 418 BC (Liv. 4,47,49; [1. 394]). Municipium (Cic. Planc. 23). Caesar had a villa in the ager Labicanus, which was known for its wine (Suet. Iul. 83). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography 1 A. Alföldi, Early Rome and the Latins, 1963. G. Tomassetti, La campagna r…

Labienus

(862 words)

Author(s): Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
Nomen gentile of Etruscan origin; the family, which belonged to Rome's equestrian class, came from northern Picenum (Cic. Rab. perd. 22; Caes. B Civ. 1,15,2). [German version] [1] L., Q. Slain in the Curia c. 100 BC Uncle of L. [3], supported L. Ap(p)uleius [I 11] Saturninus in 100 BC and was slain at his side in the Curia on the Forum Romanum (Cic. Rab. perd. 14; 18; 20-22; Oros. 5,17,9). Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) [German version] [2] L. (Parthicus), Q. Commander in Asia Minor and Armenia c. 40 BC Son of L. [3]. At the end of 43 BC he undertook treaty negotiations at the behest of the m…

Labiovelar

(269 words)

Author(s): Plath, Robert (Erlangen)
[German version] (< Latin labium ‘Lip’ and velum ‘sail’). Stop simultaneously articulated with lips and velum. The labio-velars kw gw gwh , along with the velars k g gh and the palatals ǵ ǵh form the group known as the gutturals and belong to the proto-Indo-European phoneme system, which is continued in all Indo-European languages, but does not remain unchanged in any of them. Originally, the labio-velars were retained in the centum languages. In Greek they are preserved as such in the Mycenaean of the 2nd millennium BC an…

Labotas

(50 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] (Λαβώτας; Labṓtas). Legendary Spartan king of the house of the Agiads. During his (fictional) reign (traditionally 1025/4-989/8 BC), Sparta is said to have fought against Argus for the first time (Apollod. FGrH 244 F 62; Hdt. 1,65; 7,204; Plut. Mor. 224c; Paus. 3,2,3f.). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)

Labraunda, Labranda

(312 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Λάβραυνδα, Λάβρανδα; Lábraunda, Lábranda). Locality and sanctuary of the Carian Zeus Stratios (also Labrandos), situated on a southern spur of Mt Latmus. Connected by a sacred road to Mylasa, to which it belonged as kṓmē together with the later settlement (Str. 14,2,23). Place name and name of the god are pre-Greek. The double-headed axe ( lábrys) of L. was believed to have been taken over from the Amazons or the Lydian Heraclid kings (Plut. Quaest. Graec. 45). The cult statue ( xóanon ) with the shouldered lábrys is depicted on coins of the 4th cent. BC. The shri…

Labraundos, Labrandeus

(5 words)

see Zeus

Labronios

(56 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (λαβρώνιος, -ον; labrṓnios, -on). Persian luxury vessel of precious metal and unknown form (large, flat, with large handles, Ath. 11,484c-f, 784a, 500e). As it is named by Athenaeus loc cit. in connection with lakaina and lepaste (both types of vessels), the labronios is probably a type of drinking bowl. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)

Labrum

(398 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (from lavabrum, diminutive labellum, Greek λουτήριον/ loutḗrion and λεκάνη/ lekánē). The labrum, a large shallow basin with a raised, thickened rim and resting on a high pedestal, served various purposes. As materials used for the labrum, marble, porphyry, clay, stone and others are cited. In the Greek realm, the labrum is a washbasin where men and women cleansed themselves with water; on vases in Lower Italy this often takes place in the presence of Eros, with waterfowl (swans or geese) sometimes cavorting in the water of the labrum. It also often appears in love o…

Labrys

(254 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (ἡ λάβρυς; he lábrys) refers to the double-headed axe (Latin bipennis), which has two blades opposite each other; it is a tool as well as a ritual device and religious symbol. The expression, known in Greek only as a Lydian word in a gloss (Plut. Mor. 45,302a), was introduced into scholarly language in the late 19th cent. to refer to the Minoan ritual symbol as well as to indicate its Anatolian origin. In Minoan but more especially in Greek ritual, there is good evidence for the double-head…

Labynetus

(114 words)

Author(s): Högemann, Peter (Tübingen)
[German version] (Λαβύνητος; Labýnētos; Hellenized form of Akkadian Nabû-na'id/Nabonid). The Hellenized form of the name occurs only in Herodotus [1]. By L., he is probably referring to the kings of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (625-539 BC)in general. Two Neo-Babylonian kings play a part in Herodotus: Nebuchadnezzar [2] II (604-562), together with a Cilician ruler ( Syennesis), he negotiated the truce of 585 BC between the Lydians and the Medes (Hdt. 1,74). Nabonid (555-539), was a confederate of Croes…

Labyrinth

(1,193 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
(λαβύρινθος; labýrinthos, labyrinthus). [German version] A. The concept The term ‘labyrinth’ denotes in current usage either the labyrinth in the narrow sense; or in the broad sense, any maze or confusing, large building (especially since the Hellenistic period as a motif in literature or in the pictorial arts); or else in a figurative sense, it is used as a metaphor or allegory for the vagaries and deceptions of human life. This last sense can increasingly be observed after the 3rd cent. AD. Walde, Christine (Basle) [German version] B. The labyrinth in the narrow sense The labyrinth in …

Lacapeni

(132 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] (Λακαπηνοί; Lakapēnoí). Byzantine imperial family of Armenian origin. Romanus I Lacapenus took the regency in AD 919 for Constantinus [9] VII. Porphyrogenetus, who was still a minor; he married the emperor to his daughter, had himself successively crowned co-emperor and emperor-in-chief in 920, forcing the emperor into the background by crowning his own sons Christophorus († 931), Stephanus and Constantinus co-emperors. In 944, Romanus I was deposed by his surviving sons, but they were themselves deposed in 945 by Constantine VII. Theophylactus, a younger son …

Lacedaemon

(132 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λακεδαίμων; Lakedaímōn). [German version] [1] Son of Zeus and Taygete Son of Zeus and Taygete (Apollod. 3,116), name-giver of the Taygetus, mountain range; L. inherits the rule from the childless Eurotas (Paus. 3,1,1f.), gives his name to the region, and founds the city of Sparta, which he names after his spouse Sparte. One of their sons, Amyclas, founds the city of Amyclae [1] (Eust. AD Hom. Il. 295,14f.). One of their daughters, Eurydice, marries Acrisius, king of Argus, and becomes mother of Danae…

Lacedaemonius

(92 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne)
[German version] (Λακεδαιμόνιος; Lakedaimónios). Athenian, son of Cimon [2] and Isodice (Plut. Cimon 16). He served as hípparchos around 445 BC (IG I3 511; [1. 45-49]). In the summer of 433 L., as stratēgós, was sent to Corcyra with ten ships to assist the allied island in its conflict with Corinth (Thuc. 1,45,2f.; Plut. Pericles 29; ML 61). Beck, Hans (Cologne) Bibliography 1 G. R. Bugh, The Horsemen of Athens, 1988. Davies 8429, XIII G. E. M. de Ste. Croix, The Origins of the Peloponnesian War, 31989, 76f. Traill, PAA 600810.

Lacedas

(68 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] (Λακήδας; Lakḗdas; Hdt. 6,127,3: Λεωκήδης; Leōkḗdēs). Legendary king of Argus, by tradition the son of the historically debated Pheidon [3]. L. was regarded as the father of Meltas, the last king of the Argives (Paus. 2,19,2) [1. 385; 2. 107ff.]. Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) Bibliography 1 P. Carlier, La royauté en Grèce avant Alexandre, 1984 2 Th. Kelly, A History of Argos to 500 BC, 1976.

Laceria

(80 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Λακέρεια; Lakéreia). Settlement on the northern shore of Lake Boebe in Magnesia, only attested in archaic times (Pind. Pyth. 3,58f.); its location - like that of its neighbouring settlement Amyrus - has yet to be established. L. was said to be the home of Coronis, the mother of Asclepius. Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) Bibliography B. Helly, Le ‘Dotion Pedion’, Lakereia et les origines de Larisa, in: Journal des Savants 1987, 127ff. F. Stählin, Das hellenische Thessalien, 1924, 58f.

Lacerna

(172 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A fringed (schol. Pers. 1,54) open cloak, a special form of the sagum , probably introduced in the 1st cent. BC (first mention Cic. Phil. 2,30,76); used at first as a soldier's coat which in poetry might also be worn by mythical kings and heroes (e.g. Ov. Fast. 2,743-747; Prop. 4,3,18). The lacerna soon became an everyday garment and was popular in the 1st cent. AD. Initially made of coarse wool, light fabrics were also used which were dyed purple or scarlet (Mart. 2,29,3; 4,61,4; 4,8,10; Juv. 1,27). The lacerna was worn over the tunica, instead of the toga, or over…

Lacerta

(5 words)

see Lizard; Crocodile

Lacetani

(88 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Iberian tribe (not to be confused with the Iaccetani; e.g. Ptol. 2,6,71; [1]), who settled the southern foothills of the eastern Pyrenees, west of Llobregat, east of Segre, south of Noya and Cervera (Liv. 21,61,8; 28,24,4; 34,20,1; Plin. HN 3,21). They were one of the earliest tribes to be subjugated by the Romans (Plut. Cato Maior 11,2; cf. Cass. Dio 45,10; Sall. Hist. 2,98,5; [2. 50f.]). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography 1 Holder, s.v. iaccos 2 A. Schulten, Fontes Hispaniae Antiquae 3, 1935. Tovar 3, 35ff.

Lachares

(480 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Cologne) | Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald)
(Λαχάρης; Lacháres). [German version] [1] Athenian demagogue and confidant of Cassander Athenian, demagogue and confidant of Cassander. L. succeeded, with a mercenary force, in establishing a rulership in Athens, probably from early in 300 BC to early in 295 (Olympiad Chronicle FGrH 257a F 1-4; Plut. Demetrius 33; however, IG II2 646 indicates 294 BC), which is described in ancient sources as a tyrannis, although fundamental organs of democracy continued to operate. Following the death of Cassander (297), L. managed to hold out, but was forced …

Laches

(266 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld)
(Λάχης; Láchēs). [German version] [1] Athenian strategós from a wealthy family, sent to Sicily in 427 BC with 20 warships Athenian stratēgós from a wealthy family, sent to Sicily in 427 BC with 20 warships to protect the cities allied to Leontini (Thuc. 3,86) against Syracuse, he successfully led a number of campaigns out of Rhegium against the Aeolian Islands, Mylae, Inessa and the Locrians (Thuc. 3,88; 90; 99; 103; Diod. Sic. 12,54,4f.). After his return in the winter of 426/5 (Thuc. 3,115), he was prosecuted with…

Lachesis

(4 words)

see Moira

Lachmann's law

(212 words)

Author(s): Haebler, Claus (Münster)
[German version] Discovered by the classical philologist and Germanist Karl Lachmann (1793-1851) in 1850, a ‘phonological rule’ in the Latin verbal system: significantly, verbs whose stem ends in a voiced occlusive -g or -d show a long vowel before -t-suffixes of the perfect passive participle and that of verbal derivations - along with the corresponding consonantal assimilation at the morpheme boundary. But this rule does not apply in quite a number of cases. Vowel length is proven above all by epigraphical spellings with the apex (…

Laciadae

(194 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Λακιάδαι; Lakiádai). Attic deme, gave its name to the asty trittys of the phyle Oeneis (IG I3 1120), with two (three) bouleutaí; originally the name of an Attic family. Steph. Byz. s.v. Λ. transmits Λακιά as a place name, with the demoticon Λακιεύς. Its location on the Sacred Road east of the Cephis(s)us [2] is confirmed by Paus. 1,37,2, who (ibid.) attests a temenos of the eponymous hero Lacius, the grave of the kithara player Nicocles of Tarentum, an altar to Zephyrus and a sanctuary to Demeter, Kore, Athena and Poseidon. The sacred fig tr…

Laciburgium

(62 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Λακιβούργιον; Lakiboúrgion). Site in northern Germania magna, west of the Oder (Ptol. 2,11,12), not yet localized. Possibly a misspelling of Asciburgium (modern Moers-Asberg). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography A. Franke, s.v. L., RE 12, 344f. G. Chr. Hansen, in: J. Herrmann (ed.), Griech. und lat. Quellen zur Frühgesch. Mitteleuropas bis zur Mitte des 1. Jt. u.Z., Teil 3, 1991, 581.

Lacinius

(129 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λακίνιος, Λακῖνος; Lakínios, Lakînos). Iapygian king who ruled over the land of the Bruttii; eponym of the Lacinium Mountains near Croton. L. took in Croton, who had been banished from Corcyra, and gave him his daughter Laure (or Laurete) in marriage (schol. Lycoph. 1007; schol. Theoc. 4,33b). When Heracles [1] returned from his Geryon adventure, he came into conflict with L. Concerning the cause of this, there are two variant accounts: either L. refused hospitality to Heracles, c…

Lacius

(146 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
(Λάκιος; Lákios, ‘the ragged one’). [German version] [1] Attic hero Attic hero, after whom the deme Laciadae was named; his heroon was on the Sacred Road to Eleusis (Paus. 1,37,2). Michel, Raphael (Basle) [German version] [2] Rhodian from Lindus Rhodian from Lindus, mythical founder of the Lycian city of Phaselis near the border with Pamphylia. When L. went to Delphi with his brother Antiphemus, to question the oracle, he was sent east, his brother west. As a result he founded Phaselis, and his brother Gela in Sicily (Aristaenetus…

Laco

(69 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Cognomen of Etruscan origin in the families of the Cornelii (Cornelius [20] and lulii and of P. Graecinius L. A follower of M. Antonius [I 9] mentioned by Cicero in 44 BC (Cic. Phil. 2,106; Cic. Att. 16,11,3) bearing the name probably came from a family of the urban nobility of Anagnia, the Abbutii Lacones (ILS 6258). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Schulze, 81; 153; 316.

Lacobriga

(186 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
There were three towns of this Celtic [1] name. [German version] [1] Town in the north of Palantia In the territory of the Vaccaei, north of Palantia in northern Spain ([2]; Plin. HN 3,26; Ptol. 2,6,49; It. Ant. 395,1; 449,3; 454,1). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) [German version] [2] Lusitanian town near modern Lagos Lusitanian town (Plut. Sertorius 13,7; Ptol. 2,5,5; Mela 3,7). Many remains on the Monte de Figuerola near modern Lagos in the Algarve [3], possibly identical to the diocese Laniobrensis ecclesia, mentioned often in ecclesiastical documents [2. 134; 4; 5; 6]. Barceló, Pedro (Po…

Lacon

(84 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Λάκων; Lákōn). Otherwise unknown epigrammatical poet (Sicilian origin has been suspected, cf. Theoc. Eidyllion 5), to whom a single votive poem (Anth. Pal. 6,203) is attributed; it may alternatively be the work of Philippus [32] of Thessalonica, the author of the Garland: eleven iambic trimeters, describing the miraculous healing of an old, limping woman in the hot springs of the river Symaethus on Etna. The woman dedicates her stick to the nymphs. Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) Bibliography GA II 2, 369.

Laconian

(6 words)

see Doric/Northwest Greek; Tsakonian

Laconian vase painting

(487 words)

Author(s): Steinhart, Matthias (Freiburg)
[German version] In Sparta, painted ceramics were produced for export as early as the 7th cent. BC. Initially associated with Cyrene, one of the first places where Laconian vase paintings (LVP) were found, the origin of LVP was secured with the excavation of the Artemis Orthia Sanctuary in Sparta. Dating for LVP, which is considered to have reached its peak c. between 575 and 525 BC, is primarily derived from groups of findings in Tarentum and Tocra [3. 8-9]; the representation of Arcesilaus [2] II, which was probably created during his reign [3. 195; 1…

Laconica

(993 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] A. Name Lakōnikḕ gê (Λακωνικὴ γῆ) or L. chṓra (Λ. χώρα) is the customary appellation in prose literature for the national territory of Sparta, especially in Thucydides, always in Polybius, also Herodotus (1,69; 6,58,1), Xenophon (Hell. 4,7,6; 4,8,8; 6,2,31; 6,5,21), Aristophanes (Vesp. 1162; Pax 245), Strabo (8,2,2; 4,9; 5,4ff.), Pausanias (3,1,1; 21,6; 4,1,1; 16,8; 17,1) and Ptolemy (3,16,9), in Latin Laconica (Plin. HN 2,243; 4,1; 5,32; 6,214; 25,94). Epigraphically, this appellation appears only in one proxeny list from Ceos in the 4th …

Laconicum

(5 words)

see Baths; Thermae

Lacrates

(36 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] Spartan olympic champion; died in 403 BC during a skirmish in Piraeus against resistance fighters who freed Athens from the rule of the ‘Thirty’ ( Triakonta) (Xen. Hell. 2,4,33). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)

Lacringi

(81 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] A Lugian (Vandalic) tribe (Λάκριγγοι/ Lákringoi, Cass. Dio 71,12,2; Lacringes, SHA Aur. 22,1), who fought against Rome in the Marcomannic Wars in AD 170. The L. were settled as foederati in the north of Dacia, where they defeated the Asdingi. Both tribes later counted as Roman allies (cf. Cass. Dio 71,11,6). In later years the L. intermingled with other members of the Vandalic tribes. Burian, Jan (Prague) Bibliography L. Schmidt, H. Zeiss, Die Westgermanen, 1940, 163, 165, 167, 169.

Lactantius

(1,240 words)

Author(s): Heck, Eberhard (Tübingen) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[1] Christian Theologist and apologist, c. 250-325 [German version] A. Life L. Caelius Firmianus qui et L., Christian Latin writer, born in Africa around 250, probably died in Gaul in 325. Diocletian summoned him to teach rhetoric at Nicomedia in Bithynia where he converted, and after the outbreak of the Great Persecution of Christians in 303 he became an apologist ( Apologists). Around 315, Constantine [1] brought him to Gaul, probably to Trier, to be the teacher of his son Crispus. Heck, Eberhard (Tübingen) [German version] B. Works De opificio dei (‘On the Workmanship of God’; 303…

Lactodurum

(65 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Present-day Towcester, Northamptonshire; It. Ant. 2; 6. Late Iron Age settlement; from the mid 1st cent. AD a Roman army station. The town was protected in the 2nd cent. by the construction of a rampart and ditch; stone fortifications were added in the 3rd cent. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 382f.

Lactora

(183 words)

Author(s): Polfer, Michel (Ettelbrück)
[German version] Suburb of a civitas in Aquitania, modern Lectoure (Département Gers), south of Aginnum (modern Agen). Other name evidence: Lacturatis, Notae Tironianae 87,77; Lactura, It. Ant. 462,5; Lactora, Tab. Peut. 2,2; Lacura, Geogr. Rav. 4,41; in provincia Novempopulana ... civitas Lactoratium, Notitia Galliarum 14; ordo Lactor( atium), CIL XIII 511. Oldest historical evidence is a honorary inscription of AD 105, mentioning a procurat( or) provinciarum Lugduniensis et Aquitanicae item Lactorae (CIL V 875 = ILS 1374). 22 altars testify to a taurobolium

Lactuca

(307 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Lettuce plant Lettuce (θρίδαξ/ thrídax, also θρύ-, θρόδαξ/ thrý-, thródax, θριδακίνη/ thridakínē, Lactuca sativa L.), the lettuce plant known in several varieties (Theophr. Hist. pl. 7,4,5 et passim), whose cultivation and protection against pests, as well as culinary and medical uses, are described by Theophrastus. Thus, according to Theophr. Hist. pl. 7,6,2, its juice is said to help against dropsy and eye sores. Lettuce has been cultivated in Europe, North Africa and Asia for a long time …

Lacunar

(269 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Passed down in Vitruvius [1. s.v. l.], an architectural technical term, on many occasions there also designated as lacunaria (pl.), for the sunken panels that decorated the ceiling between wooden beams crossing one another ( Roofing), the Greek equivalent being phátnōma, gastḗr, kaláthōsis [2. 45-52 with additional terms for details of the lacunar]. Lacunaria were as a rule three-dimensionally recessed and decorated with paintings or reliefs (mostly ornamental). In the temple or columned building, the place where they were first app…

Lacus

(5 words)

see Wells; Cistern

Lacus Albanus

(76 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Lake in the largest of the volcanic craters of the mons Albanus , where Alba Longa and various villas were located, e.g. those of Pompey and Domitian, as well as the Castra Albana of Septimius Severus. In 398 BC the water level was regulated through a drainage channel (Liv. 5,15; Cic. Div. 1,100). Famous wines grew on the slopes (Plin. HN 14,64; 23,33). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography P. Chiarucci, Albano Laziale, 1988.

Lacus Alsietinus

(96 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Lake in southern Etruria in a small volcanic crater, modern Lago di Martignano. Augustus had an aqueduct built from here, the aqua Augusta Alsietina, which provided water for the naumachia in Rome and the nemus Caesarum (Frontin. Aq. 1,11; 2,71) in Trastevere. At Careiae (modern Santa Maria di Galeria) it reached the Aro, an outlet for the lacus Sabatinus (modern Lago Bracchiano), which added more water; an overflow channel was intended for irrigation. The aqueduct continued south at the foot of the Ianiculum; the water was not potable. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Lacus Avernus

(206 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] (Greek Ἄορνος, Áornos). Volcanic lake connected to the sea near Baiae ( Campi Phlegraei ), especially deep (Lycoph. 704; Diod. Sic. 4,22; Aristot. Mir. 102), sulphurous vapours (Verg. Aen. 6,242; Lucr. 6,744; Plin. HN 31,21; Serv. Aen. 3,442). The lacus Avernus (LA) owed its reputation above all to its connection with the Underworld. The Cimmerii were alleged to have lived here in deep holes (Str. 5,4,5); here Odysseus (Str. 5,4,5f.) and Aeneas (Verg. Aen. 3,442; 6,126; Ov. Met. 14,101ff.) entered the world of the dead, for which reason the LA was the Ianua Ditis ( Dis Pa…

Lacus Benacus

(84 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Today Lago di Garda. Largest Alpine lake in the area of Verona (Plin. HN 9,75), with a length of 500 stadia (along the eastern shore road; cf. Str. 4,6,12; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,131); the river Mincius flows through it. It was navigable despite severe storms (Verg. G. 2,160). The Benacenses (TIR L 32,33) lived on the western shore. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography TIR L 32,80 A. Mosca, Caratteri della navigazione nell'area benacense in età romana, in: Latomus 50, 1991, 269-284.

Lacus Brigantinus

(178 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] Lake formed by the river Rhenus at the northern foot of the Alps (538.5 km2, greatest depth 252 m), named after the Brigantii ( Brigantium) who lived there, modern Lake Constance. Mentioned by Str. 4,3,3 without a name of its own (cf. also Str. 4,4,9; 7,1,5; 5,1; Mela 3,24; Cass. Dio 54,22,4; first by Plin. HN 9,63: lacus Raetiae Brigantinus). Inhabitants of the region were the Vindelici, Helvetii and Raeti. Mela 3,24 differentiates between the upper lake ( lacus Venetus) and the lower lake ( lacus Acronus). Plin. HN 9,63 mentions a type of fish, mustela, in the lacus Briganti…

Lacus Curtius

(156 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Monument on the Forum Romanum in Rome, which already in antiquity was associated with various myths of Rome's early history ( Curtius [1]). Probably built in the Augustan period, the lacus Curtius (LC) was among the monuments on the Roman Forum that served as vivid, palpable manifestations of early Roman history and, as such, provided a means by which mythology could be given a role to play in the depiction of historical reality, which so far had been recorded primarily in the form of chronicles. The LC consist…

Lacus Fucinus

(190 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Bove, Annalisa (Pisa)
[German version] A lake that often overflows because it has no outlet (155 km2, 655 m above sea level) in the area of the Marsi between Sulmona and the national park of Abruzzo. Caesar contemplated draining it (Suet. Iul. 44), Augustus prevented it (Suet. Claud. 20), Claudius realized it in part by laying a 5.65 km long drainage to the Liris (Suet. Claud. 20f.), under Nero the project was stopped (Plin. HN 36,124). According to CIL IX 3915, renewed flooding in AD 117 made it necessary to reclaim the borderin…

Lacus Larius

(156 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] Modern Lago Lario or Lago di Como. Formed by the Addua, which flows out again from the eastern arm (Plin. HN 2,224; Str. 4,6,12), it bisects the central foothills of the Alps. In antiquity, it stretched further towards the north (Cato fr. 38). The via Regina [1] runs parallel along the western shore from Comum to the Alpine passes (Splügen/Cuneus Aureus, Maloja, Julier) [2. 14]. In the pre-Roman period ( Golasecca culture) [3. 159] it was an important connection from the Po Plain to central Europe, in the Roman period a com…

Lacus Lemanus

(161 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] Largest of the Alpine lakes (581 km2), modern Lake Geneva. Documented by Caes. B Gall. 1,2,3; 8,1; 3,1,1; Str. 4,1,11; 6,6; 11; Luc. 1,396; Mela 2,74; 79; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,33; Ptol. 2,10,2; Amm. Marc. 15,11,16. It. Ant. 348,2: lacus Lausonius; Tab. Peut. 3,2: lacus Losanenses. It was the border between Gallia Belgica or Germania superior and Gallia Narbonensis and thus separated the Helvetii in the north from the Allobroges in the south. In Genava harbour installations have been established through dendrochronological methods for the…

Lacus Lucrinus

(140 words)

Author(s): de Vido, Stefania (Venice)
[German version] Brackish lagoon on the Campi Phlegraei, separated from the sea by a sandbar, on which Hercules is supposed to have built the via Herculanea (Str. 5,4,5f.). The lake was known for its wealth of fish. The later Augustus and Agrippa had the lacus Lucrinus (LL), together with lacus Avernus, converted into the portus Iulius (Plin. HN 36,125; Serv. Aen. 2,161). There were many famous villas on the LL (Cic. Att. 14,16), of which there are no remains due to volcanic eruptions and shifting shorelines (bradyseism); the lake, too, is now largely buried. de Vido, Stefania (Venice) Bibli…

Lacus Nemorensis

(332 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake in Latium near Aricia in the Alban Hills (Plin. HN 19,141), modern Lago di Nemi. An underground drainage adit (Str. 5,3,13) was cut around the 4th cent. BC [1]. The forested slopes on its banks formed the nemus Dianae (grove of Diana, with temple and high priest, rex Nemorensis, who - always a runaway slave - had to kill his predecessor in single combat [2; 3; 4]). The nemus Dianae led to the lake being called lacus Nemorensis (Prop. 3,22), but also speculum Dianae (‘Mirror of Diana’) (Serv. Aen. 7,516). There was a community of villas (Cic. Att. 6,1,4…

Lacus Pelso

(302 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] (also L. Pelsois, L. Pelsodis). Lake in Pannonia (today 591 km2, 106 m above sea level, average depth 3 m), important as a shipping route with many overland connections, modern Balaton in western Hungary. Pliny (HN 3,146) has Lacus Pelso (LP) border on the territory of the Norici ( Noricum) and the deserta Boiorum ( Boiohaemum), which commonly led to the assumption that Lake Neusiedel was also called LP [1. 26f.; 2; 3. 61]. While the area west of LP is supposed to have been dependent on the Norici in the early 1st cent. AD [4. 15f.]…

Lacus Prelius

(72 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Coastal lake in Etruria (Cic. Mil. 74; Prile, Plin. HN 3,51) between Vetulonia and Rusellae (the remnants of which can still be seen in the Padule di Raspollino), with a station ad lacum Aprilem of the via Aurelia (It. Ant. 229; 500; Tab. Peut. 4,3). It was fed by the Bruna, which emptied into the mare Tyrrhenum at Castiglione della Pescaia (province of Grosseto). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Lacus Regillus

(90 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake (now dry) in agro Tusculano (Liv. 2,19ff.) near Frascati; modern Pantano Secco. In 499 or 496 BC, a battle between Romans and Latini took place there (Liv. l.c.; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 6,3,3, with the rumour that the Dioscuri had caused the Roman victory). The foedus Cassianum , which was agreed afterwards, regulated the return of Rome into the Latin League. Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography A. Alföldi, Early Rome and the Latins, 1965, 111-116 M. Pallottino, Origini e storia primitiva di Roma, 1993, 322-323.

Lacus Trasumenus

(126 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Lake between Cortona [1] and Perusia, modern Lago Trasimeno. It was here in 217 BC that Hannibal [4] defeated the Romans under C. Flaminius [1] (Pol. 3,80-85; App. Hann. 38-41; Liv. 22,4,1) in the Second Punic War. The site of the battle is uncertain: between Montigeto and Montecolognola [1], between Borghetto and Montigeto [2. 105-115] or between Borghetto and Tuoro [3. fig. 15]. Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography 1 J. Kromayer, Die Schlacht am Trasimenischen See und die Methode der Schlachtfeldforsch., in: Neue Jbb. für das klass. Alt. 25, 1910, 185-200 2 G. D…

Lacus Vadimonis

(86 words)

Author(s): Bianchetti, Serena (Florence)
[German version] Crater lake in southern Etruria between Orte and Bomarzo, modern Lago di Bassano (Plin. Ep. 8,20; Plin. HN 2,209; Sen. Q Nat. 3,25,8). The Romans under P. Cornelius [I 27] Dolabella defeated Etrusci and Galli there in 283 BC (Pol. 2,19,7-20,6; 310 BC according to Liv. 9,39). Bianchetti, Serena (Florence) Bibliography A. N. Sherwin-White, The Letters of Pliny, 1966, 472-473 M. Torelli, Storia degli Etruschi, 1981, 255 C. Saylor, Overlooking Lake Vadimon: Pliny on Tourism (Epist. 8,20), in: CPh 77, 1982, 139-144.

Lacus Velinus

(231 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] A lake formed by the rivers Avens, Himella and Tolenus in the territory of the Sabini in the plains below Reate. It was partially drained in 272 BC by the consul Curius [4], through the drainage system of the Cascata delle Marmore, which gave the waters of the Avens an artificial outlet. The lake drained into the Nar above Interamna [1]. Q. Axius (Varro, Rust. 2,1,8) and Cicero (Att. 4,15) [1] had villas here. The drainage of Lacus Velinus caused quarrels between Reate and Interamna (Varro, Rust. 3,2,3; Cic. Att. 4,15,5; Cic. Scaur. 12,27; Tac. Ann. 1,79; palus Reatina, Plin. …

Lacus Verban(n)us

(59 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] A lake formed by the Ticinus in the Alpine foothills, modern Lago Verbano or Lago Maggiore (Pol. 34,10,21 = Str. 4,6,12; Plin. HN 2,224; 3,131; 9,69); Verg. G. 2,159 possibly hints at the lacus Verban(n)us. Vicus Sebuinus, later called Angleria (modern Angera), is on the eastern shore. Sartori, Antonio (Milan) Bibliography Nissen, vol. 1, 181.

Lacydes

(230 words)

Author(s): Stanzel, Karl-Heinz (Tübingen)
[German version] (Λακύδης; Lakýdēs) of Cyrene. Academic philosopher of the 3rd cent. BC. Took over the leadership of the Academy from Arcesilaus [5], which he held, according to Diog. Laert. 4,60/61, for 26 years and handed over in his own lifetime to Evander and Telecles. How the information contained in Philod. Academicorum Index 27,1-7 is to be reconciled with this is disputed (details in [1. 831]). L. died most likely in the year 207 BC ([1. 830], differently [2. 50]). He lectured in a garden…

Ladas

(5 words)

see Olympic champions

Lade

(79 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich)
[German version] (Λάδη; Ládē). Island originally off the coast of Miletus, length 3 km, height up to 98 m, today only a hilly ridge about 2 km from the coast because of the alluvial deposits of the Maeander. L. became known through the defeat of the Greeks in the Ionian Rebellion 496 BC: Hdt. 6,7ff.; Thuc. 8,17,3; Arr. Anab. 1,18,4ff.; Str. 14,1,7; Paus. 1,35,6. Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) Bibliography L. Bürchner, s.v. L., RE 12, 381.

Ladon

(581 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Lienau, Cay (Münster) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
(Λάδων; Ládōn). [German version] [1] Dragon The dragon referred to in Apoll. Rhod. 4,1396, elsewhere referred to only as a ‘serpent’ ( óphis, drákōn), who guards the apples of the Hesperides (as also mentioned on Probus in Verg. G. 1,244); he has a hundred heads and many voices. Mythographers have him either be descended directly (as a chthonic beast) from Gaia (as is Typhon) or from related monsters (Phorcys and Ceto, the parents of Echidna and grandparents of the Lernean Hydra in Hes. Theog. 333-335; Echidna and…

Laeca

(21 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen, perhaps of Etruscan origin, in the family of the Porcii. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Schulze, 358.

Laecanius

(181 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] C.L. Bassus Senator from Pola, cos. Suff. In 40 AD Senator from Pola in Istria. Praetor urbanus in AD 32; cos. suff. AD 40. L. ran a sizeable pottery production on his property on the Istrian peninsula; his son carried it on [1. 230ff.]. PIR2 L 30. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [2] C.L. Bassus Consul ord. 64 AD Son of L. [1]. Consul ordinarius AD 64. He died in the reign of Vespasian [1. 230ff.]; his adoptive son was L. [4] (cf. [2. 115f.]). PIR2 L 31. Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [3] C.L. Bassus Caecina Paetus see Caecina [II 6]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) …

Laeceni

(83 words)

Author(s): Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Λαικηνοί/ Laikēnoí, Λαιηνοί/ Laiēnoí, Λεηνοί/ Leēnoí, Ptol. 6,7,22). Tribe who settled to the east of the central Arabian mountain range of Zámēs. Their name is not mentioned in any other ancient source and has to date not been satisfactorily interpreted. Perhaps the L. should be identified with the aṣḥāb al-Aika, the ‘people of the thicket’ or, rather, the ‘people of al-Aika’ mentioned in the Koran (15,78 et passim), a prehistoric people allegedly annihilated by the wrath of God. Müller, Walter W. (Marburg/Lahn)

Laeetani

(134 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Iberian tribe ( laiescon [1. 19]) on the Spanish east coast between Barcelona and Blanes; regarding the various spellings and misspellings of the name ( Laietani, Leetani, Lacetani, Laletani, Lasetani) cf. [2. vol. 6, 235; 3; 4]; Plin. HN 3,21; Str. 3,4,8; Ptol. 2,6,18; 72; ILS 2714a; CIL II Suppl. 6171. Wine of inferior quality was cultivated there in large amounts (Plin. HN 14,71; Mart. 1,26; [2. vol. 1, 136, vol. 3, 51, vol. 6, 235f.; 5. vol. 8, 184, 195, 292]). Viticulture Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography 1 A. Hübner, Monumenta Linguae Ibericae, 1893 2 A. Schulten (…

Laelaps

(81 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λαῖλαψ/ Laîlaps, ‘hurricane’). [German version] [1] Dog of Cephalus The dog of Cephalus, inescapable because of its swiftness. L. is turned to stone during the chase (Ov. Met. 7,771ff.; Hyg. Fab. 189; Serv. Aen. 6,445). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Dog of Actaeon Dog of Actaeon that, together with the rest of a pack of hounds, attacks and kills his master who has been transformed into a stag by Artemis (Ov. Met. 3,211; Hyg. Fab. 181). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Laelia

(121 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Elder daughter of C. Laelius [I 2], wife of Q. Mucius Scaevola Elder daughter of C. Laelius [I 2], born 160 BC, wife of Q. Mucius Scaevola. One of her two daughters married the orator L. Licinius [I 10] Crassus, the tutor of Cicero, who observed that L. had adopted the speaking style of her father (Cic. Brut. 211). Cicero may have been encouraged to write of L.'s father ( Laelius sive de amicitia) while in her house. Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) [German version] [2] Younger sister of L. [1], wife of the annalist C. Fannius [I 1] Younger sister of L. [1], born after 160 BC, w…

Laelianus

(128 words)

Author(s): Franke, Thomas (Bochum)
[German version] Imperator Caesar Ulp(ius) Cor(nelius) Laelianus (RIC V 2, 373 no. 8; [1. 66 no. 6]). Probably commander of the legio XXII Primigenia in Mogontiacum (Mainz) or governor of the province of Germania superior, rebelled early in AD 269 against Postumus and was proclaimed Augustus. Shortly afterwards Postumus defeated and killed him (Aur. Vict. Caes. 33,8; Eutr. 9,9; Iohannes Antiochenus fr. 152 FHG, here incorrectly ‘Lollianus’); according to another tradition (SHA Tyr. Trig. 4; 5; 6,3; 8,1), L. was murdered by Victorinus or by his own soldiers. Franke, Thomas (Bochum) Bib…

Laelius

(1,467 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
Name of a family which probably came from Campania. The military successes of L. [I 1] in the Second Punic War (218-201 BC) and the connection to the elder Scipio probably gained them Roman citizenship and the ascent into the nobility. A younger line ( praenomen D.) became consuls under Augustus (L. [II 1-3]. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] L., C. Consul 190 BC, elder contemporary of Scipio Africanus Born around 235 BC, died around 160; L. owed his political ascent to the close (and what has become a proverbial) connection to P. …

Laena

(144 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A coat-like cloak made of thick wool (Greek: (χ)λαῖνα/ (ch)laîna). Cited in Rome as an article of clothing of the Augures and Flamines when offering sacrifice, as well as of the mythical kings, and found on monuments; in the Imperial period it was part of men's and women's costume. The laena was a special form of the toga and was made by doubling the semicircular-shaped cut of the toga praetexta to an almost circular cloth. By laying together the two circular segments, a toga-like garment was formed that was laid around the shoulders and covered both arms. The laena was worn o…

Laenas

(72 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen, derived by Cicero (Brut. 56) from laena, the cloak of the flamines , but in fact of Etruscan origin and probably an ethnicon (cf. Asprenas, Maenas, etc.). In the Republican era it was the hereditary surname in the Popillius family (from cos. 359 BC on), in the Imperial period also in the Octavius and Vipsanius families. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina, 210 Schulze, 83; 186; 530.

Laenes

(46 words)

Author(s): Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
[German version] (Λαίνης; Laínēs). Comic poet of the 2nd cent. BC, attested only in inscriptions; he won three victories at the Dionysia (1. test. 2), one of which is dated to 185 BC (1. test. 1). Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG V, 1986, 609.

Laerces

(62 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
(Λαέρκης/ Laérkēs, ‘where there is protection for warriors’). [German version] [1] Myrmidon A Myrmidon, son of Haemon, father of Alcimedon [2] (Hom. Il. 16,197; 17,467). Michel, Raphael (Basle) [German version] [2] Goldsmith from Pylos A goldsmith from Pylos; he had to gild the horns of an ox that was destined to be sacrificed to Athena (Hom. Od. 3,425). Michel, Raphael (Basle)

Laertes

(236 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Λαέρτης; Laértēs). Son of Arcesius and of Chalcomedusa, husband of Anticlea, father of Odysseus (cf. the latter's patronymic, Laertiádēs, ‘son of L.’); in his various depictions, the last is the most important function of L., who has little significance of his own. The image of him in the ‘Odyssey’ is the formative one it has shaped all later representations. Before the beginning of the Trojan War, for reasons of age, L. passes his power to Odysseus. Even when Odysseus does return to assume the th…

Laestrygones

(260 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Λαιστρυγόνες; Laistrýgónes). A mythic and fairy-tale-like people of man-eating giants, who raise cattle but do not engage in agriculture (cf. Cyclopes). In the course of his wanderings, Odysseus lands in their country, where the sun never sets. After an initial friendly greeting of his scouts by the king's daughter, the mood shifts when they catch sight of the giant queen. The king, summoned by his wife, devours one of the Greeks, and the rest of the L. destroy the entire fleet.…

Laestrygoni campi

(6 words)

see Laestrygones; Leontini

Laeta

(149 words)

Author(s): Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] [1] Second wife of the emperor Gratianus [2] from AD 383 on Second wife of the emperor Gratianus [2], whom she married in AD 383. Following his death shortly afterwards, L. lived on as a widow at Rome, where she used her own funds to help alleviate the famine during Alaricus' [2] siege in 409 (Zos. 5,39,4). PLRE 1,492 (L. 1). Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main) [German version] [2] Clarissima femina, addressee of Jerome's epist. 107 Clarissima femina, daughter of one Albinus, wife of Toxotius, daughter-in-law of the elder Paula, sister-in-law of E…

Laeti

(200 words)

Author(s): Kehne, Peter (Hannover)
[German version] Etymologically (Etruscan, Celtic, Germanic, Latin?) disputed technical term for descendants of prisoners or dediticii , predominantly of Germanic origin (Amm. Marc. 20,8,13), who settled in Gaul under state supervision on barren, remote estates ( terrae laeticae: Cod. Theod. 13,11,10). Laeti had limited rights, were bound to the soil, obliged to do military service, but were not ‘soldier-farmers’ [2]. The Notitia dignitatum records, under the magister peditum in Gallia, twelve praefecti laetorum (Not. Dign. Occ. 42,33-44) with details of nationality…

Laetorius

(319 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
Roman family name of Etruscan origin [1. 187; 200; 205]. The gens is attested firmly from the end of the 4th cent. BC; 5th century bearers of the name are annalistic inventions (the people's tribune 471 BC: Liv. 2,56, 6-15; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 9,46,1-48,5). Originally plebeian, the family was patrician from the time of Caesar or Augustus (Suet. Aug. 5,1; [2. 89f.]). [German version] [1] L., C. Curule aedile in 216 BC Curule aedile in 216 BC, propraetor in Gaul in 209, legate in Greece (?) in 205, in Upper Italy in 200, Triumvir at the foundation of the colony in Croton in 194 (Liv. 34,45,4). Elvers,…

Laetus

(120 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Successful commander of Septimius [II 7] Severus during the Parthian War of AD 195 and again in 198. L. was murdered because he was too popular with the army; Severus denied that this was on his orders; L. probably fell victim to the thirst for power of the praetorian prefect Fulvius [II 10] Plautianus. PIR2 L 69. L.'s identification is disputed: according to [1. 116f.] he was identical to Iulius Laetus, who led the vanguard of Severus' army on their march into Rome in 193, and who in 197, allegedly after much hesitation, won the vic…

Laevi

(49 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Ligurian (Liv. 5,25,2; Plin. HN 3,124) or Celtic (Cato in Plin. l.c.; Λάοι, Pol. 2,17,4) tribe which founded the city of Ticinum (modern Pavia), together with the Matrici; Ticinum later fell under the rule of the Insubres (Ptol. 3,1,33). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography Nissen 2, 179.

Laevinus

(26 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen for the Valerii in the Republican era, no longer attested in the Imperial period. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Kajanto, Cognomina, 243.

Laevius

(374 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] [1] L. (Baebius or Manius), dictator Latinus L. (Baebius or Manius) Egerius [2] had the sanctuary of Diana Nemorensis (Cato fr. 58 Peter) dedicated in his capacity as dictator Latinus. Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva) Bibliography C. Ampolo, Ricerche sulla lega latina, II. La dedica di Egerius Baebius, in: PdP 212, 1983, 321-326. [German version] [2] Probably the first lyric love poet of Rome, 2nd or early 1st cent. BC Probably the first lyric love poet of Rome, 2nd (cf. [8]) or early 1st cent. BC (for example, according to [2. 118]), and in the latt…

Lafrenius, T.

(41 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] One of the twelve praetors of the insurgent Italians during the Social War [3]. L. fell in 90 BC, in the battle against Ser. Sulpicius Galba (App. B Civ. 1,181; 204-206; ILLRP 1089). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
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