Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Lamprocles

(114 words)

Author(s): Robbins, Emmet (Toronto)
[German version] (Λαμπροκλῆς; Lamproklês). Musician and poet of Athens, early 5th cent. BC. Among his pupils were Damon, the teacher of Pericles (Diels/Kranz 1, 382), and possibly Sophocles (Ath. 1,20e states that the latter's teacher was Lamprus; perhaps a confusion with L. [1. 315]). Ath. 11,491c cites a dithyramb fragment. The only other preserved fragment comes from a hymn to Athena (schol. Aristoph. Nub. 967). To L. is attributed the observation that the Mixolydian mode does not relate to the other keys in the manner assumed until that time [2. 223-224]. Robbins, Emmet (Toronto) Bib…

Lamprus

(75 words)

Author(s): Zaminer, Frieder (Berlin)
[German version] (Λάμπρος; Lámpros). Musician, praised by Aristoxenus [1] as a master on a par with Pindar, Dionysius [39] of Thebes and Pratinas (Aristox. fr. 76 Wehrli). Also considered a music teacher, similar to Antiphon as teacher of rhetoric (Pl. Menex. 236a). The assumption that he may have been Sophocles' dance and music teacher (Ath. 1,20e) is difficult to reconcile chronologically with the testimony of the comedian Phrynichus (Ath. 2,44d). Zaminer, Frieder (Berlin)

Lampsacus

(640 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | Xenophon | Colonization | Pergamum | Persian Wars | Pompeius | Delian League (Λάμψακος; Lámpsakos). Town in the Troad (Str. 13,1,18f.; Ptol. 5,2,2), named after Lampsace, daughter of the Bebrycian king Mandron; modern Lâpseki, entirely built over in modern times, so that ancient remains are scarce. L. was founded (Eus. chronikoi kanones 95d) in 654/3 BC by Phocaeans [2. 107f.], not by Milesians (Str. 13,1,19). In 560 BC, a dispute broke out with…

Lampsakenos

(185 words)

Author(s): Klose, Dietrich (Munich)
[German version] Ancient name for the staters of Lampsacus in Mysia. 1. χρυσοῦ στατῆρες Λαμψακηνοί/ chrysoû statêres Lampsakēnoí on stele with Parthenon architectural inscriptions, Athens, 447/6-434 BC (IG I2 339-353 = IG I3 436-451). The staters are of elektron, obverse Pegasus protome facing to the left, reverse quadratum incusum of four quarters. Three groups (525-500; 500-494; about 450 BC) can be differentiated. 2. στατῆρα Λαμψακηνὸν χρυσοῦν/ statêra Lampsakēnòn chrysoûn; χρυσίω Λαμψακανῶ στ[ατεῖρας]/ chrysíō Lampsakānô st[ateîras] or similar on inscriptions from…

Lamptrae

(294 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Λαμπτραί; Lamptraí). Attic deme of the phyle Erechtheis, 307/6-201/0 BC of Antigonis, that consisted of the smaller mesogeia deme of ‘upper L.’ (Λ. καθύπερθεν) with five bouleutaí and the larger coastal deme of ‘lower L.’ (Λ. ὑπένερθεν or παράλοι, ‘on the coast’), with nine bouleutaí (Harpocr. s.v. Λαμπτρεῖς; Hsch. s.v. Λαμπτρά). Upper L. comprised Lambrika, which preserves the name, with the centre of the deme near Kitsi. Important early Mycenaean acropolis of Kiapha Thiti and Mycenaean necropoleis at this location [1. 54…

Lampus

(102 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle)
(Λάμπος/ Lámpos, also Λάμπων/ Lámpōn). [German version] [1] Brother of Priam Son of Laomedon, brother of Priamus; member of the Trojan council of elders; father of Dolops who was killed by Menelaus (Hom. Il. 3,146; 15,526; 20,238; Apollod. 3,146). Christodorus (Anth. Pal. 2,251ff.) describes a statue of L. in the Zeuxippus thermal baths in Constantinople. Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) [German version] [2] Name of a horse Name of a horse (i.a. Hom. Il. 8,185: horse of Hector; Hom. Od. 23,246: horse of Eos). Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) Bibliography P. Müller, s.v. L., LIMC 6.1, 191 P.…

Lampytus

(36 words)

Author(s): Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
[German version] (Λάμπυτος; Lámpytos). Poet of the New Comedy, known only from an inscription; in 167 BC he took fourth place at the Dionysia (I. test.). Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG V, 1986, 609.

Lamus

(231 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle) | Hild, Friedrich (Vienna) | Tomaschitz, Kurt (Vienna)
(Λάμος/ Lámos). [German version] [1] Son of Poseidon, king of the Laestrygones Son of Poseidon, old king of the Laestrygones and constructor of their stronghold at Telepylus (Hom. Od. 10,81ff.; Ov. Met. 14,233). On account of the identity of Telepylus and Formiae, Hor. Carm. 3,17 imagines his friend Aelius Lamia from Formiae to be L.'s offspring. Walde, Christine (Basle) [German version] [2] Eponym of the Thessalian town Lamia (also Lamius). Son of Hercules and Omphale, eponym of the Thessalian town Lamia (Diod. Sic. 4,31). He persecutes his half-brother Bargasu…

Lamynthius

(96 words)

Author(s): Robbins, Emmet (Toronto)
[German version] (Λαμύνθιος; Lamýnthios). Lyric poet from Miletus, dating uncertain. Phot. s.v. calls him a ‘poet of erotic poetry’ (ποιητὴς ἐρωτικῶν μελῶν; poiētḕs erōtikôn melôn); Ath. 13,596f-597a mentions two poets who write about hetaerae named Lyde: Antimachus [3] of Colophon, who composed his Lýdē in elegiac meter, and L., who according to Clearchus composed lyrical verse about a foreign (βαρβάρου/ barbárou) girl of the same name in his Erōtiká. He is named by Epicrates [4] in the Antilaḯs (PCG v 4) as the author of love songs. Fragments have not been preserved. Robbins, Emmet (…

Lanassa

(170 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Λάνασσα; Lánassa). [German version] [1] Ancestress of the Molossian dynasty Daughter of Cleodaeus, granddaughter of Hyllus, great-granddaughter of Hercules [1], ancestress of the Molossian dynasty of Epirus (Plut. Pyrrhus 1,2; Lysimachus, FGrH 382 F 10). Neoptolemus abducts her from the Zeus temple of Dodona, marries her and has eight children with her, among them Pyrrhus (Iust. 17,3,4). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) Bibliography P. Levêque, Pyrrhos, 1957, 643 M. Schmidt, s.v. L., RE 12, 617. [German version] [2] Wife of Pyrrhus and Demetrius Poliorcetes, 3rd cent. BC Daughter…

Lancearii

(237 words)

Author(s): Link, Stefan (Paderborn)
[German version] Soldiers equipped with the lancea; they served in the Roman army as elite troops (Jos. BI 3,120; 5,47), speculatores (scouts), and in the imperial bodyguard (Suet. Claud. 35,1; Suet. Galba 18,1). The lancea, also called hasta [1] am(m)entata, was a long spear with a thong ( ammentum) in the middle (Isid. Orig. 18,7,5); this increased the leverage of the arm and gave the lancea additional spin, so that it flew quite far. Of less penetrating power than the pilum , the lancea, for whose origin many different opinions existed (Plin. HN 7,201; Gell. NA 15,30,7; Dio…

Lancia

(300 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] [1] Town near modern Mansilla de las Mulas, northern Spain Town of the Astures near modern Mansilla de las Mulas, northern Spain, approximately 20 km from León (on the Celtic place name [1; 2], also [3; 4]). Conquered in 25 BC by P. Carisius, but spared (Cass. Dio 53,25,8; Flor. Epit. 2,33,37f.; Oros. 6,21,10; cf. also Plin. HN 3,28; Ptol. 2,6,28; It. Ant. 395,3; [5]). Substantial, almost exclusively Roman remains; Roman coins. Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography 1 Holder, s.v. L. 2 A. Schulten, Los Cántabros y Astures ..., 1943, 107, 151 3 F. Abbad Rios, F. Jordá Cerdá, In…

Landed property

(5 words)

see Economy

Landlordism

(630 words)

Author(s): Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] The term landlordism is not documented by contemporary sources; it is a term of classification of agrarian and social structure which first arose during the transition to the modern era and designates a conglomerate of rent-bearing powers of control over ‘land and people’ which is typical for the European Middle Ages and the Ancien Régime [7]. Therefore, all applications of this term to other circumstances - including Roman antiquity - are misleading at best. M. Weber's [10] clear…

Land register

(298 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] One can only speak of a land register (LR) in the legal sense when a complete, comprehensive register of property - either of all inhabitants (personal property system) or of all plots of land in a precinct (real property system) - is generally acknowledged, thus guaranteeing the right of ownership of the registered purchaser. In antiquity, there were numerous simple property registers ( Estate register), which, however, mostly served as the basis for tax assessment (examples and literature [1]). Institutions for the control of legal transactions regarding p…

Landscape painting

(971 words)

Author(s): Hoesch, Nicola (Munich)
[German version] A. Greece The lack of material records for ancient Greek painting also creates difficulties when attempting a definition and evaluation of this genre. However, based on today's knowledge of the monuments, it is fairly safe to assume that it cannot be equated with independent landscape painting (LP), as practised by the Dutch painters or during Romanticism, which forms the basis of the modern concept [4. 176]. Antiquity did not know a specific term for LP as we understand it [1. 190;…

Landscape (Scenery)

(670 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] From a historio-geographical perspective, the term landscape carries several basic implications and connotations. Generally speaking, it can designate a space where historically relevant events have taken place. It is then attributed the quality of a historical source, to be interpreted in a variety of ways. Of further interest is the reciprocal relationship between man and landscape in terms such as: how did man perceive, design, and change the landscape? And how, on the other ha…

Land surveying

(895 words)

Author(s): Folkerts, Menso (Munich)
[English version] The writings of the Roman surveyors ( agrimensores) deal with their various areas of activity: measurement of areas; limitation, i.e. division by orthogonal boundaries; creation of land registers and general parceling maps; functioning as a judges or experts in land law, particularly in boundary disputes; collaboration in religious ceremonies; units of length and area, weights and determining area and volume. Mathematical questions are dealt with most notably by Balbus' work Expositio et ratio omnium formarum (ca . AD 100), the anonymous Liber podismi and a wo…

Land transport

(3,099 words)

Author(s): Raepsaet, Georges (Brüssel)
[German version] A. Introduction Investigation into land transport (LT) in antiquity is made difficult today because of the controversies and polemics that distinguishes much of the scholarship on the subject. The predominant viewpoint until about 1960 underestimated the significance of LT because of considerations of economic or technical history. The dichotomous view of history in Lefèbvre des Noëttes [8] - who proposed the thesis that antiquity was not capable of economic development due to inade…

Langarus

(74 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Λάγγαρος; Lángaros). King of the Agrianes, already a friend of Alexander [4] during the lifetime of Philip II. In 335 BC, L. attacked the Autariatae as Philip's ally to plunder their land and cover Alexander's rear in his campaign against Cleitus [8] and Glaucias [2]. Alexander rewarded him generously and offered him his half-sister Cyn(n)ane as wife, but L. died before the wedding (Arr. Anab. 1,5,1-5). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)

Langobardi

(572 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] (etym. Lang(a/o)-bardoz, ‘the long beards’ [9]). Germanic tribe which Tacitus (Germ. 40,1) and Ptolemy (2,11,9) count among the Suebi; according to tribal mythology [1], they wandered out of southern Sweden as the Winniler into territories south of the Baltic Sea around 100 BC and fused with other peoples. The L. are archaeologically confirmed on the lower course of the Elbe (in the Bardengau) from the 1st cent. BC onwards. Briefly driven back to the east bank by Tiberius in AD 5 (…

Language

(1,091 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] The term designates the primary medium of human communication and the ability to communicate by means of it, as well as the specific occurrences of this medium of communication as adopted by individual speech communities (i.e. individual languages). In the former definition, language was already an object of scientific consideration ( Linguistic theory) in antiquity, Plato's dialogue ‘Cratylus’ being its most prominent product. Plato discusses, among other things, the question, if ‘names’ originated θέσει/ thései (i.e. ‘by fixation’ or ‘agreement’ of th…

Language change

(756 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] I. General A universal tendency of human language is perpetual change on all levels caused by external factors (e.g. Language contact) as well as internal ones (e.g. anomalies). Language change (LC) over a long period of time in any given language will first lead to dialectal diversification ( Language strata), then, esp. in cases of geographical separation, may result in a division into related yet independent languages. It is therefore reasonable to assume that not only languag…

Language contact

(566 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Language contact (LC) occurs when two or more languages, usually geographical neighbours, collide through the mixing of the respective speaker communities, making communication across the language boundaries necessary or possible. A typical phenomenon of intensive LC is bilingualism, in which individual speakers have sufficient mastery of two (or more) languages and use them alternately ( Multilingualism), not to be confused with diglossia which refers to the change between diff…

Language families

(10 words)

see Indo-European languages; Semitic languages; Linguistic affinity

Language, philosophy and theory of

(2,171 words)

Author(s): ST.M.-OE.
(Signs, theory of) [German version] I. Area of study While today, linguistic theory (LT) is largely considered an integral part of a general theory of signs, in antiquity (before Augustine, about AD 400) the two theoretical fields, language and signs, were at first clearly distinguished from one another. The linguistic expression ‘sign’ (σημεῖον/ sēmeîon) is mentioned occasionally and in passing (Pl. Soph. 262a 6; Aristot. De Interpretatio 1,16a 6). Yet ‘sign’ as defined and discussed by ancient philosophy is exclusively the indexical sign, i.e. t…

Language, philosophy of/Semiotics

(4,041 words)

Author(s): Meier-Oeser, Stephan
Meier-Oeser, Stephan [German version] A. Introduction and Definition of Terms (CT) With regard to the reception history of ancient language philosophy and semiotics, two points must be made in advance: 1. In Antiquity there were no literally equivalent terms for either 'philosophy of language' or 'semiotics'. With 'philosophy of language' one is dealing with a term which was not introduced until the 18th cent.; likewise, the name 'semiotics', derived from 'σημεῖον' ( sēmeíon, sign), which is used to describe the general study of natural and artificial signaling syst…

Language society

(6 words)

see Academy

Language strata

(763 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main) | Binder, Vera (Gießen)
[German version] I. Overview From a synchronic point of view, ‘language strata’ (LS) represents a cover term for the different forms that a given language takes in its use by individual speakers (idiolect), by speaker groups defined by their social position (sociolect) or by geographically determined speaker communities ( Dialect); from a diachronic point of view, LS refers to the various historical strata of a given language that can be identified on the lexical (inherited and loan vocabulary), grammatical (syntactic or morphological) and phonological levels. The existence of L…

Language switching

(452 words)

Author(s): Binder, Vera (Gießen)
[German version] Language switching (LS) can occur on a social as well as on an individual level. In the first case, a demographic or functional minority gives up its language after a period of bilingualism, and adopts the language of the majority. Not the extinction of speakers, but LS is the most common cause of language death ( Language change and dialectal compensation are not considered LS). Typical attendant phenomena are interferences with the dominant language, non-adapted loan words, dism…

Laniarium

(6 words)

see Meat, consumption of

Lanice

(73 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Λανίκη/ Laníkē; probably a short form of Ἑλλανίκη, Hellaníkē, Curt. 8,1,21). Sister of Cleitus [6], wet-nurse of Alexander [4], who allegedly plaintively called on her after Cleitus' death (Arr. Anab. 4,9,3f.; Curt. 8,2,8f.). L.'s husband is unknown. Two of her sons fell at Miletus, one - Proteas - became famous as a drinking-companion of Alexander (Ath. 4,129a; Ael. VH 12,26). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve, no. 462, cf. no. 664.

Lanista

(97 words)

Author(s): Onken, Björn (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] The lanista trained gladiators (Suet. Iul. 26,3; Sen. Ben. 6,12,2). Lanistae frequently owned fighters themselves, whom they rented or sold to holders of games; thus they had an important function particularly for the holding of games in the smaller country towns (ILS 5163 l. 9f.; 35; 37; 41; 57; 59). Successful lanistae could realize considerable incomes this way; however, their social status was low (Mart. 11,66), and they were not allowed to hold offices in the municipia (ILS 6085 l. 123). Munus, Munera Onken, Björn (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography 1 T. Wiedemann, Emper…

Lantern

(5 words)

see Lighting; Lamp

Lanuvium

(218 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Tribus | Latini, Latium Town in Latium in the southern foothills of the Alban hills, 18 miles from Rome on the via Appia, modern Lanuvio. Participated in the foedus Cassianum of 493 BC. Loyal to Rome during the Latin War of 340 ( Latin League), L. received the civitas Romana; municipium (338 BC; Liv. 8,14,2), possibly tribus Maecia. Birth-place of the emperors Antoninus Pius and Commodus. The modern settlement is located on top of the ancient town; only the arx (‘castle’), surrounded by a tuff wall, on the hill of…

Lanx

(191 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A plate or flat Roman bowl of varying size, form (oval, rectangular or multiangular) and function; it was used in kitchen work (e.g. Petron. Sat. 28,8), but more often for the serving of dishes like fish, meat and poultry (Mart. 7,48,3; 11,31,19); drinking-cups were served on it. It also found use in Roman legal relations. It is mentioned further as a torture instrument, and the head of John the Baptist was presented on a lanx. In religious ritual , lanx generally designates the sacrificial vessel (e.g. Verg. G. 2,194; Verg. Aen. 213-214). Materials for the lanx included pr…

Laocoon

(725 words)

Author(s): Maharam, Wolfram-Aslan (Gilching)
(Λαοκόων; Laokóōn, Latin Laocoon). [German version] [1] Trojan Trojan, son of Capys [1]/Antenor, brother to Anchises, priest of Apollo Thymbraeus (Euphorion, CollAlex 43 fr. 70 = Serv. Aen. 2,201) or Poseidon (schol. Lycoph. 347; Tzetz. Posth. 713-714). Father of Ethron and Melanthus (Serv. Aen. 2,211) or Antiphas and Thymbraeus (Hyg. Fab. 135) and husband of Antiope (Serv. Aen. 2,201). The earliest reference to L. is in Arctinus of Miletus (EpGF 62,11). Following the apparent withdrawal of the Greek…

Laocoon group

(2,908 words)

Author(s): Hinz, Berthold (Kassel RWG)
Hinz, Berthold (Kassel RWG) [German version] A. Discovery and Display (CT) More than almost any other work of art the Laocoon group (LG) has left an indelible mark on the history of art and intellectual history of the European modern age. It was found on 14 January 1506 in Rome, in a buried vaulted chamber at S. Pietro in Vincoli (anonymous letter to G. S. L'Arienti, 31 January 1506 [28. 26 f.]). Seeking further information, Pope Julius II sent to the site of the find his architect, Giuliano da Sangallo, who (accompanied by Michelangel…

Laocoon group

(858 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] A group of marble statues, found in 1506 in the area of the Baths of Trajan in Rome, highly regarded, widely received and academically controversial since its discovery (Rom, VM). It shows Laocoon and his two sons, entangled in sea snakes and nearing death. Its identity with a marble group praised by Pliny (HN 36,37: omnibus et picturae et statuariae artis praeferendum) of the artists Agesander, Athanodorus and Polydorus from Rhodes in the house of Titus, was recognized immediately. The first phase of reception stands under the influence o…

Laocoosa

(61 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
[German version] (Λαοκόωσα; Laokóōsa). Daughter of Oebalus and wife to her own half-brother Aphareus [1]; mother of Idas, Lynceus (Theoc. 22.206) and Peisos (Apollod. 3.117). According to Apollodorus and Pherecydes (FGrH 3 F 127), her name was Arene (eponym of the homonymous Messenian town: Paus. 2,4,2), according to Peisander (FGrH 16 F 2) she was Polydora. Michel, Raphael (Basle)

Laodamas

(196 words)

Author(s): Michel, Raphael (Basle)
(Λαοδάμας; Laodámas, ‘subjugator of peoples’). [German version] [1] Son of Eteocles Son of Eteocles [1]. In his youth, Creon [1] is his guardian; as soon as L. is of legal age he succeeds his father (Paus. 1,39,2). In the Battle at Glisas, he kills the Epigone Aegialeus [1], son of Adrastus, but is himself killed by Alcmaeon (Apollod. 3,83). According to another version, he withdraws after a defeat, with some of his followers, to the Encheleans in Illyria, where his ancestor Cadmus once ruled (Hdt. 5,61; Paus. 9,5,13), another part conquers Homole in Thessaly (Paus. 9,8,6). Michel, Raphael…

Laodameia

(298 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin)
(Λαοδάμεια; Laodámeia). Ep. feminine name (‘Ruler over the People’) of various mythological figures. [German version] [1] Daughter of Bellerophon and a daughter of the Lycian king Iobates Daughter of Bellerophontes and a daughter of the Lycian king Iobates, mother by Zeus of Sarpedon (Hom. Il. 5,196-199; Apollod. 3,1,1; Serv. Aen. 1,100). According to Hom. Il. 5,205 she is killed by the enraged Artemis. Waldner, Katharina (Berlin) [German version] [2] Wife of Protesilaus Daughter of king Acastus of Iolcos, wife of Protesilaus, who goes off immediately after the wed…

Laodice

(2,285 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
(Λαοδίκη; Laodíkē). I. Mythology [German version] [I 1] Daughter of Priamus and Hecuba Daughter of Priamus and Hecabe; her husbands are given as Helicaon (Hom. Il. 3,122-124; 6,252), through whom she was spared enslavement after the fall of Troy (Paus. 10,26,3), or Acamas (Parthenius 16 MythGr), Demophon [2] (Plut. Thes. 34,2) or Telephus (Hyg. Fab. 101). According to Apollodorus (Epit. 5,25), after the fall of Troy she was swallowed up by a cleft in the earth (cf. also Lycoph. 316f.; Tryphiodorus 660f.). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [I 2] Daughter of Agamemnon …

Laodicea

(1,011 words)

Author(s): Gerber, Jörg (Bochum) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Belke, Klaus (Vienna) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
(Λαοδίκεια; Laodíkeia). [German version] [1] Port-town in north-west Syria, modern Latakia This item can be found on the following maps: Syria | Theatre | | Coloniae | Commerce | Hellenistic states | Limes | Pompeius | Education / Culture (Λ. ἐπὶ τῇ θαλάσσῃ; L. epì têi thalássēi). Port in north-west Syria (now Latakia or al-Lāḏiqīya), not far from the Bronze Age Ugarit (Ra's Šamra). Founded by Seleucus I around 300 BC together with its sister towns of Antioch, Apamea and Seleucea (the so-called North Syrian Tetrapolis) and equipped with an…

Laodiceans, letter to the

(9 words)

see New testament apocrypha

Laodocus

(334 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λαόδοκος, Λαοδόκος, Λεώδοκος; Laódokos, Laodókos, Leṓdokos, ‘Who receives the People’). [German version] [1] Son of Apollo and Phthia Son of Apollo and Phthia, offers hospitality to Aetolus, who fled to them in the country of the Curetes; Aetolus slays L. along with his brothers Dorus and Polypoetes and renames the country ‘Aetolia’ (Apollod. 1,57). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Participant in the campaign of the Argonauts Son of Bias [1] and Pero; native of Argos; together with his brothers Talaus and Arius he takes part in the campaign of the…

Laogonus

(30 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Λαόγονος/ Laógonos, ‘who grew out of the people's army’). Descriptive name of two Trojan warriors in the Iliad (Hom. Il. 16,303 and 20,460). Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)

Laogoras

(63 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαογόρας; Laogóras). Dryopian king who by holding a banquet in the manner of his people in the grove of Apollo offends against the god. L. supports the Lapith prince Coronus in his attack on the Dorian king Aegimius [1]. The latter calls Hercules for help, who then kills L. and Coronus (Apollod. 2,154f.; Diod. Sic. 4,37,3). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Laographia, Laographos

(156 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (λαογραφία, λαογράφος; laographía, laográphos). From the Ptolemaic period onwards, censuses were conducted in Egypt ( laographíai: the people were ‘written down’). These took place from Augustus onwards on a 7-year cycle, and from Tiberius onwards every 14 years. In the Roman period, laographía also referred to the list compiled in the process of those liable for poll tax and the poll tax itself ( Taxes). Men between the ages of 14 and 60 were subject to it unless they were Roman citizens or citizens of privileged Greek p…

Laoi

(117 words)

Author(s): Gerber, Jörg (Bochum)
[German version] (λαοί/ laoí: plural word for Greek laós ‘folk’, approximate meaning ‘people’). In the Hellenistic monarchies (cf. Hellenistic states), especially in documentary sources (i.e. inscriptions, papyri), term for the indigenous subjects, in particular the rural population under the direct control of the royal administration. In the royal lands in the narrower sense, these were also called laoi basilikoí (‘the king's people’). The term does not refer to any specific social or legally defined class but comprises, from the point of view of the …
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