Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Laokritai

(182 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (λαοκρίται; laokrítai). Authorized by the king in Ptolemaic Egypt, consisting in each case of three judges of Egyptian ethnic origin taken from the priestly class, before whom the Egyptians (λαός/ laós, the people) could resolve their civil law disputes according to their hereditary law and in the Demotic language. A building ( laokrísion) designated for the laokritai is attested from the Fayûm (PTebtunis 795,9; 2nd cent. BC). An official of Greek nationality ( eisagogeús ) appointed by the central administration acted as the chairman…

Laomedon

(589 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Λαομέδων; Laomédōn, ‘Ruler of the People’). [German version] [1] Mythical king of Troy Mythical king of Troy, son of Ilus [1]. Sons: Priamus, Hicetaon, Clytius [ I4], Lampus, Tithonus (Hom. Il. 20,236ff.), the illegitimate Bucolion (ibid. 6,23), and according to Ilias parva 29,4 PEG I Ganymede [1] as well. Daughters: Antigone [4], Astyoche [2], Hesione [4], etc. The main sources for his story (diverging in the details) are Homer (Il. 5,640ff.; 7,452f.; 20,145ff.; 21,441ff.), Apollodorus (2,103f.; 1…

Laon

(63 words)

Author(s): Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
[German version] (Λάων; Láōn). Writer of the New Comedy. As he is quoted by Heraclides [18], it is safe to assume he belongs in the 3rd cent. BC. Two fragments are extant, of which fragment 1 is from a play Διαθῆκαι ( Diathêkai, ‘The Wills’); in fragment 2 (without a play title) an adulterer speaks. Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG V 610.

Laonome

(90 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
(Λαονόμη; Laonómē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Guneus Daughter of Guneus, wife of Alcaeus [1] (other names are also mentioned), mother of Amphitryon (Paus. 8,14,2; Apollod. 2,50). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [2] Daughter of Amphitryon and Alcmene Daughter of Amphitryon and of Alcmene, sister of Heracles [1], wife of the son of Poseidon Euphemus (schol. Pind. Pyth. 4,79). In Hellanicus (FGrH 4 F 13) she is associated with the god of the Underworld Hodoedocus. Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) Bibliography K. Meuli, s.v. L. (1)-(2), RE 12, 758.

Laothoe

(84 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
(Λαοθόη; Laothóē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Thespius Daughter of Thespius, by Heracles [1] mother of Antiphus (Apollod. 2,163). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [2] Lover of Apollo Lover of Apollo, by whom she bears Thestor, grandmother of Calchas (Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 108). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [3] Concubine of Priamus Concubine of Priamus, by whom she bears Lycaon and Polydorus (Hom. Il. 21,34f., 85-96; 22,46-48). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) Bibliography O. Scherling, s.v. L. (1)-(3), RE 12, 761.

Lapathus

(49 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Λαπαθοῦς; Lapathoûs). Small fortress in southern Olympus [1] above the Tempe valley near Condylum, near modern Hagios Elias, also called Charax. L. is mentioned because of the Roman troop movements in 169 BC (Liv. 44,2,11). Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) Bibliography F. Stählin, Das hellenische Thessalien, 1924, 10f.

Lapethus

(232 words)

Author(s): Senff, Reinhard (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Kypros | Diadochi and Epigoni | Pompeius (Λάπηθος; Lápēthos). Port on the northern coast of Cyprus [1]. According to Str. 14,6,3, it was founded by Lacones under Praxander (Λάπαθος, Str. l.c.; Λάπηθις Φοινίκων, Scyl. 103). Phoenicians are attested epigraphically and through coins of king Sidqimelek ( c. 440-420 BC) [1]. The last king, Praxippus, was on the side of Antigonus [1] and was deposed by Ptolemy I in 312 BC (Diod. Sic. 19,59,1; 62,6; 79,4). In the Hellenistic period, there is evi…

Laphria

(4 words)

see Artemis

Laphyron

(5 words)

see War booty

Laphystios

(4 words)

see Zeus

Lapidation

(258 words)

Author(s): Völkl, Artur (Innsbruck)
[German version] As a form of lynch law, lapidation was probably very widespread in antiquity. It occurred not only to vent the rage of the people (tumultuary lapidation), but also as punishment after proper proceedings. In this way, primarily among the Jews, lapidation was quite simply capital punishment ( Stephanus [4]). But unlike the Romans, the Greeks also appear to have used lapidation especially in the case of offences against the community and against religion. It is incontestable that leg…

Lapis

(355 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(stone) denotes various stones used for ritual purposes in Roman cult worship. [German version] [1] Silex kept in the sanctuary of Iuppiter on the Capitol A silex which was kept in the sanctuary of Iuppiter Feretrius on the Capitol (Fest. 81,18 L.) was of particular significance in some ancient oath ceremonies, which ran according to the principle, common in the swearing of oaths, of analogy in action [1]: a) The Fetiales concluded international treaties by killing a pig with the silex from the sanctuary of Iuppiter Feretrius, thereby calling down the same death upon themse…

Lapis lazuli

(419 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Wartke, Ralf-B. (Berlin)
[German version] (Sumerian iagin > Akkadian uqnû > Greek κύανος/ kýanos > Lat. cyanus; Egyptian ḫsbḏ). The blue rock is a complicated silicate related to the artificial ultramarine. It is characterized by its more or less deep blue colour, often with golden specks of iron pyrite. Lapis lazuli (LL) was extracted in what is present-day Afghanistan/province of Badaḫšān and in the Afghan-Pakistani borderland (Quetta), brought from there to the Near East and to Egypt via the Sinai. It was traded raw, separated from…

Lapis niger

(186 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Block of black marble found at Rome in 1899 during excavations in the Forum Romanum in front of the Curia Iulia. It is probably the niger lapis in comitio from Fest. 184 L. The upper section of the stone is damaged; on five sides it bears a fragmentary inscription, difficult to read and dating from the (early?) 6th cent. BC (probably the lex sacra of the Volcanal, the surrounding sacred precinct), which mentions a ‘king’ ( recei), his ‘herald’ ( calator) and iouxmenta (draught animals? carts?). This may be the inscription which Dionysius of Halicarnassus (Ant. …

Lapis Satricanus

(263 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Stone inscription, slightly damaged, of the 2nd half of the 6th cent. BC, discovered in 1977 at Satricum (Latium) beneath the Temple of Mater Matuta, which was constructed around 500 BC. The inscription, one of the earliest in the Latin language, is readily legible: - - -iei steterai Popliosio Valesiosio/suodales Mamartei (‘dedicated by the companions of Publius Valerius to Mars’). The incomplete beginning is probably to be read as [med h]ei (‘me here’), the object thus addressing the reader (see [1]; less likely Sal]iei, see [2], or Iun]ei, see [3]). The inscriptio…

Lapithae

(183 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
[German version] (Λαπίθαι/ Lapíthai, Latin Lapithae). Mythical Thessalian tribe (Hom. Il. 2,738ff.; Str. 9,439ff.), particularly known for their battle with the Centaurs. According to a late version, they were descendants of an eponymous ancestor Lapithes or Lapithas, who was himself descended either from Apollo and a daughter of the river god Peneius (Stilbe) or from Ixion and the slave Dia (Diod. Sic. 4,63,2; 5,58,5; Paus. 5,10,8; schol. Apoll. Rhod. 1,40). Descent from Ixion would make the L. en…

Lapithes

(8 words)

Mythological ancestral father of the Lapithae

Lappa

(167 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Crete | Macedonia, Macedones | Pompeius (Λάππα; Láppa). Town in western Crete (Str. 10,4,3) near the modern village of Argyropolis. Involved in the internal Cretan conflicts of the Lyttian War in 220 BC (Pol. 4,53-55). L. concluded an alliance with Gortyn around 200 BC, acknowledging the supremacy of its eastern neighbour [1. no. 31, p. 265-267]. In 183 BC, L. was one of the 30 Cretan towns to unite in a coalition with Eumenes II [2. 179]. In 67 BC, L. was destroyed by the Romans. Under Augustus, L. received the privileged status of a ci…

Lappius

(176 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] A. Bucius L. Maximus. Senator. Legate of the legio VIII Augusta at Argentorate around AD 77/78; Proconsul of Pontus-Bithynia under Domitian [1]. Suffect consul in 86, then consular legate in Germania inferior. When Antonius Saturninus revolted against Domitian at Mainz in late 88/early 89, L. put down the rebellion with his provincial troops; L. is described on his wife's funerary inscription (CIL VI 1347 = 37049 = ILS 1006) as confector belli Germanici, indicating acceptance of the official propaganda according to which the uprising was in reality a …

Lapsi

(260 words)

Author(s): Wickert, Ulrich (Berlin)
[German version] The Latin term lapsi, ‘lapsed’, refers to Christians who, in contrast to the ‘steadfast’ ( stantes) and the martyrs ( martyres), renounced their faith during the persecutions, esp. in the 3rd cent. Distinctions were drawn between the sacrificati, who had ‘sacrificed’ to the gods, the turificati, who had thrown incense ( tus) into the flames, and the libellatici: they had a certificate ( libellus) made attesting an alleged sacrifice. If their report was accepted, they were called acta facientes ( acta facere = ‘to have documents drawn up’); in Greek texts they …

Laquearius

(5 words)

see Munus, Munera

Laqueus

(157 words)

Author(s): Ebner, Constanze (Innsbruck)
[German version] ‘Rope’, Roman punishment of hanging. In the Republican period, however, it was not used for public execution; the suspensum Cereri necari of the Laws of Twelve Tables against the wilful destruction of crops (Plin. HN 18,3,12) does not mean hanging but tying up for whipping. On the other hand, strangulation in prison under the supervision of the tresviri capitales is, for instance, traditional for the Catilinarians (Sall. Catil. 55). This type of execution (according to Tac. Ann. 14,48 it disappeared under the first emperors) was for case…

Laran

(97 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] Etruscan god of war, most often depicted as a youth and identified by name. From the 5th cent. BC represented on Etruscan mirrors, frequently in the context with other deities, especially with Turan/Aphrodite; to a large extent equivalent to Greek Ares and Roman Mars, not identical with Etruscan Maris. L. also occurs on vessels and as free-standing sculpture (monumental: ‘Mars of Todi’), but not on the bronze liver of Piacenza ( Divination VII). Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) Bibliography I. Krauskopf, s.v. L., Dizionario della civiltà etrusca, 1985, 147f. E. Simon, s.…

Laranda

(98 words)

Author(s): Belke, Klaus (Vienna)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Diadochi and Epigoni (Λάρανδα; Láranda). Hellenistic city in southern Lycaonia, modern Karaman, became part of Galatia in 25 BC and under Antoninus Pius belonged to the treís eparchíai. Member of the koinón Lykaonías with the honorary title of ( Sebastḗ) Mētrópolis (coins) [1. 25-32, 43f.]. Under Diocletianus annexed to the province of Isauria, around 370 to Lycaonia. Bishops known from the 3rd cent., from about 370 suffragan of Iconium [2. 197f.]. Belke, Klaus (Vienna) Bibliography 1 H. v. Aulock, Mz. und Städte Lykaon…

Lararium

(225 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Private family sanctuary or cult memorial - most commonly situated in the atrium, sometimes also in the kitchen, peristyle or garden of the Roman house - for the lares familiares ( Lares; Personification), either in the form of a niche, a small temple ( Aedicula) or even in the form of a wall painting creating an architectural illusion. Lararia were originally decorated with statuettes and additional votive offerings, depending on wealth, and served a vital purpose within the larger context of social interaction as each family's representative focal point. Numerous lar…

Larch

(102 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] This conifer, Larix europaea or Larix decidua Mill., which loses its needles in autumn, does not occur in Greece but was imported by the Romans from the Alps and the Carpathians as larix and cultivated in upper Italy. The larch did not reach western central Europe until the 18th cent. Vitr. 2,9,14 mentions for the first time its wood for being resistant to rotting and fire (cf. Pall. Agric. 12,15,1), after that Plin. HN 16,43 and 45. Its solid, resin-rich, reddish wood was used for housebuilding and shipbuilding. Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) Bibliography R. Stadler, s.…

Larcius

(890 words)

Author(s): Müller, Christian (Bochum) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Name of a patrician gens, of Etruscan origin, which brought forth two figures of significance in the early Republican period. Only in the 1st cent. BC does evidence appear for further bearers of the name. I. Republican era [German version] [I 1] L. (Flavus or Rufus ?), T. Consul in 501 and 498 BC, first dictator of Rome Consul in 501 and 498 BC (InscrIt 13,1,88; 350-53). The written record, up to Festus (216 L.), names L. as the first dictator of Rome (MRR I 9f.; 11f.), but it is divided on whether L. occupied the office during his 1st (Liv. 2,18,4-7 …

Larentia, Larentalia

(6 words)

see Acca Larentia

Lares

(1,355 words)

Author(s): Mastrocinque, Attilio (Verona) | Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] [1] ( Lar, Lares). [German version] A. Nature of the lares The lares (Old Latin Lases [1]; cf. Etruscan Lasa = Nympha) are Roman spirits, which were worshipped in houses, on streets and at crossroads (= Manes: Arnob. 3,41; Serv. Aen. 3,302; = daímones: Cic. Tim. 38; CGL 2,121,17; 265,62; = hḗrōes: Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,2; Plut. Mor. 316f; CGL 2,121,14; 3,290,56); they were equated with the deified souls of the dead (e.g. Paul Fest. 273). Servius (Aen. 6,152) has the worship of the lares come from primeval household burials. The lares are male and capable of procreation;…

Large estates

(5 words)

see Latifundia

Larginus Proculus

(64 words)

Author(s): Hübner, Wolfgang (Münster)
[German version] (Πρόκλος; Próklos) is said, according to Cass. Dio 67,16,2, to have foretold the death of Domitian in Germania; he was condemned in Rome but saved after Domitian had actually been murdered on the predicted day, and was richly rewarded by Nerva. Hübner, Wolfgang (Münster) Bibliography W. and H. G. Gundel, Astrologumena, 1966, 177 A. Stein, s.v. L., RE 12, 834f.

Largitio

(4 words)

see Liberalitas

Largius Designatianus

(98 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Medical writer, 4th cent. AD, author of a Latin paraphrase of a Greek letter to (an undefined) king Antigonus that is passed down under the name of Hippocrates [6] and that contained a dietetic plan and advice on treating diseases of the head, chest, belly and kidneys. This paraphrase is extant in the introduction to a medical treatise of Marcellus Empiricus, where it is preceded by a letter of L. to his sons. Both texts probably belonged to the introduction to a medical work by L. that is lost today. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Largus

(58 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Epic poet of the Augustan period, mentioned by Ov. Pont. 4,16,17f. who praises him: as a counterpart of the Aeneis, his epic dealt with the settlement of the Trojan Antenor [1] in northern Italy. The identification with Valerius Largus, the prosecutor of the elegist Gallus, cannot be attested. Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance) Bibliography Bardon, 2,66f.

Larice

(61 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] Indian region in Gujarāt, bordering on Indo-Scythia in the west, with the capital Ozene (Ptol. 7,1,62f., see also Peripl. m.r. 41 (Ariake) and Ptol. 7,1,4f.). The name is obviously related to Old Indian Lāṭa, South Gujarāt. In this country the famous harbour town of Barygaza was situated. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography O. Wecker, s.v. L., RE 12, 837f.

Larinum

(123 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Socii (Roman confederation) | (Λάρινα; Lárina). Town of the Dauni (Steph. Byz. s.v. Λ.), afterwards of the Frentani (Ptol. 3,1,65) in Samnium on Monte Arone (475 m) to the right of the Tifernus (modern Biferno), south of Cigno, surrounded by a tributary of the Tifernus; 1 km east of modern Larino. Municipium, tribus Clustumina, regio II (Plin. HN 3,105; Mela 2,66). From the middle of the 3rd cent. BC, Greek (Campanian) and Latin (Apulian) bronze coins (HN 28f.). Considerable remains: city wall, bat…

Larisa

(2,121 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg) | Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Et al.
(Λάρισα; Λάρισσα; Lárisa, Lárissa). Name of numerous locations in Greece and Asia Minor, cf. Steph. Byz. s.v. Λ. [German version] [1] Acropolis of Argos The 289-m high acropolis of Argos with Mycenaean remains (not precisely identified) [1]. The temple of Zeus Larisaios and Athena Polias under the large Venetian castle has been excavated. References: Str. 8,6,7; Paus. 2,24,1; 3f.; Steph. Byz. s.v. Λάρισαι πόλεις. Lafond, Yves (Bochum) Bibliography 1 N. Vassilatos, Larissa. The Acropolis of Argos, 1994. [German version] [2] City in Achaea Phthiotis Important city in Achaea Phthi…

Larisus

(42 words)

Author(s): Lienau, Cay (Münster) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich)
[German version] (Λάρισος; Lárisos). Border river between Elis [1] and Achaea ( Achaeans), modern Mana (also Riolitiko), which rises in the north-western foothills of the Skollis (Str. 8,7,5; Paus. 6,26,10; 7,17,5; 9,5,19; Liv. 27,31,11). Lienau, Cay (Münster) Meyer, Ernst (Zürich)

Lark

(288 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Classical antiquity knew only one species each from two genera of the Alaudidae family: the crested lark ( Galerida cristata L.), ἡ κόρυδος/ kórydos, κορύδαλος/ korýdalos; Latin corydalus (Marcellus, De medicamentis 29,30), galerita (Plin. HN 10,137), cassita (Gell. NA 2,29,3), Celtic alauda (Plin. HN 11,121; Marcellus, ibid. 28,50), is distinguished from the skylark ( Alauda arvensis L.), which appears in Greece only as a winter visitor, by the feather crest according to Aristot. Hist. an. 8(9),25,617b 19-23. The crested lark is the s…

Laronia

(60 words)

Author(s): Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
[German version] Female critic of sexual moral hypocrisy in Juv. 2,36-65; if this is meant to be a historical person (thus [2]), she could be identical with the L. characterized as a rich widow in Mart. 2,32,5f. (also not definitely historical). Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) Bibliography 1 PIR2 L 113 2 S. Morton Braund, Juvenal. Satires Book 1, 1996, 129.

Laronius, Q.

(55 words)

Author(s): Frigo, Thomas (Bonn)
[German version] From Bruttium; in 36 BC, sent to Sicily with three legions by M. Vipsanius Agrippa [1] during the fighting against Sex. Pompeius to support Octavian, and afterwards acclaimed as imperator (CIL X 8041,18). Suffect consul in 33 with L. Vicinius (CIL I2 p. 66 = Fasti Venusini). Frigo, Thomas (Bonn)

Lars

(87 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Latin form of the common Etruscan praenomen lar and its variants (references: [4. 205-208]; the Latin form Lar is only uncertainly documented, Liber de praenominibus 4; [2]). Known bearers: L. Porsenna, king of Clusium 508 BC; L. Herminius Coritinesanus (?), cos. 448 BC, and L. Tolumnius, king of Veii (2nd half 5th cent. BC). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography 1 H. Rix, Das etr. Cognomen, 1963, 273, 348 2 O. Salomies, Die röm. Vornamen, 1986, 31f. 3 Schulze, 84 4 Thesaurus linguae Etruscae 1, 1978.

Larunda, Mater Larum

(315 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva)
[German version] The identity of the Roman goddess L. is not easily identifiable. L., also called Lara, was understood as the mother of the lares (Lactant. Div. inst. 1,20,35) and equated with Mania (Varro, Ling. 11,61). An aetiological myth says that she was also equated with Tacita Muta (‘mute’) (Ov. Fast. 2,583-616). It is disputed whether L./M.L. is the same goddess as Acca Larentia. According to Varro (Ling. 5,74), L. comes from the Sabine country; Titus Tatius dedicated an altar to her. According to an uncertain reconstruction of a passage in Tacitus (…

Larvae

(222 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva)
[German version] In the Roman sphere, larvae are spirits which cause madness (Plaut. Capt. 598; Plaut. Aul. 642): one who has lost his wits is called larvatus (Plaut. Men. 890; Paul Fest. 106 L.). The larvae are regarded as ghosts, who are considered equal to the lemures (Gloss. 5,656,14) and can thus be considered as the addressees of the lemuria (Paul Fest. 77, 25 L.). In the interpretations of Roman authors, the larvae are equated with both the maniae ( Mania) and the dii manes when these return to Earth from the Underworld (Paul Fest. 114 L.). Furthermore, they are also identified with the lar…

Larymna

(188 words)

Author(s): Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Boeotia, Boeotians (Λάρυμνα; Lárymna). Harbour town in eastern Locris, on the Gulf of Euboea [1]. Remains of fortifications near modern L., from Mycenaean, archaic and classical times as well as the Roman Imperial period, testify to the continuity of settlement and reconstruction after the destruction by Sulla (86 BC: Plut. Sulla 26,4). On the ancient road between L. and Bazaraki, near the church of Agios Nikolaos, are the ruins of an early Christian basilica. The ancient settlement was located on the hill of Bazaraki c. 2.5 k…

Laryngeal

(464 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] Technical term in modern linguistics (hybrid Lat. derivation from Greek lárynx ‘larynx’) for a class of consonants. In current Indo-European (IE) linguistics, it refers to (three) phonemes postulated in the reconstruction of the proto-language. Despite doubts as to their nature as sounds actually produced in the larynx, the term is still in use as the phonetic determination of said sounds remains controversial. Provisionally, they are designated by indices: h1 - 3 ( 1 - 3 ). These three consonants complete the Neogrammarian system of phonemes, which in …

Las

(139 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta | Achaeans, Achaea | Education / Culture (ἡ Λᾶς; hē Lâs). Spartan town of períoikoi on the west coast of the Laconian Gulf. Remains of the ancient city (ancient and classical acropolis?) near modern Passava, covered by the Hellenistic and Roman towns. The harbour of L. (Thuc. 8,91; Str. 8,5,4) lay c. 3 km away (modern Bay of Vathy). Indefinite Mycenaean remains. Evidence: Hom. Il. 2,585 (Λάας; Láas); Scyl. 46; Paus. 3,21,7; 24,6f.; Str. 8,5,3; Steph. Byz. s.v. Λᾶ/ . Inscriptions: IG V 1,1214-1217. Coins: HN, 436. Lafond, …

Lasa

(73 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] Young Etruscan goddess or demon mostly represented as winged; on Hellenistic mirrors she appears together with goddesses, heroes or nymphs. Her name appears frequently with epithets that indicate different functions that are still not clarified in detail. It is also not clear how she is distinguished from Etruscan Vanth. Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) Bibliography I. Krauskopf, s.v. L., Dizionario della civiltà etrusca, 1985, 148 R. Lambrechts, s.v. L., LIMC 6, 217-225.

Lasanum

(5 words)

see Chamber pot

Lasimus Krater

(112 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] A volute krater much cited from the late 18th to the early 20th cent. because of its inscription which mentions another lower Italian vase painter (Paris, LV, Inv. K 66 [N 3147], [1]). Research at that time discussed the written form of the letters and the artistic classification of the supposed vase painter Lasimus. Only recent research proved the inscription to be a recent addition. Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) Bibliography 1 Trendall/Cambitoglou, 914, no. 36. S. Reinach, Peintures de vases antiques recueillés par Millin (1813) et Millingen (1813), 1891, 64-67 S. Favi…
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