Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Lechaeum

(172 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Macedonia, Macedones (Λέχαιον; Léchaion). Harbour of Corinth [1] on the Corinthian Gulf, 3 km north of the city, connected with it by a double wall in the classical period ( c. 450 BC) [1]. The inner harbour basin, which is silted up today to a large extent, is still recognizable, also an outer harbour, few other remains, e.g. a large early Christian basilica [2]. Xen. Hell. 4,4,12 mentions ship sheds, and sanctuaries of Poseidon (Paus. 2,2,3; Callim. H. 4,271) and of Aphro…

Lectica

(4 words)

see Kline

Lectio senatus

(348 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (‘selection for the Senate’). The prerequisite for admission to the Roman Senate from time immemorial was that the contender had rendered outstanding political services in a high public office (Cic. Verr. 2,49; Sall. Iug. 4,4; Liv. 23,23), there were no objections to him based on criminal law or regarding his status and - later - that he had a certain minimum level of assets (under Augustus about a million sesterces: Suet. Aug. 41). If one of the prerequisites ceased to apply, a senator could be removed from office (

Lectisternium

(460 words)

Author(s): Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover)
[German version] (Etym.: Lat. lectum sternere, ‘to prepare a couch’). To serve the gods, food for the gods: a very old form of sacrifice in which a meal was laid out on a table for the god who was lying on a feasting couch in the temple (cf. Iovis epulum ). This practice was based on the idea that the gods received their share at every meal, suggesting their actual presence. The term lectisternium is only used in a sacred context. First and foremost, the lectisternium was a part of the Graecus ritus, thus a widely common form of sacrifi…

Lecton

(105 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Λεκτόν, Λεκτός; Lektón, Lektós, Cape Lecton). Western foothills of the Trojan Ida, stretching to the Aegean sea (Hom. Il. 14,283; Hdt. 9,114; Thuc. 8,101; mainly Str. in book 13). The sources merely indicate that Cape L. or a town L. was situated near modern Babakale; no further details can be determined. Close by there was an archaeologically unverifiable altar for the Twelve (Olympian) Gods (Str. 13,1,48), which was erected by Agamemnon according to the legend.…

Lector

(191 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] (‘reader’). Especially the letters of Pliny the Younger illustrate the custom of culturally enriching the mealtimes with - next to comoedi and lyristae (Plin. Ep. 1,15,2; 9,17,3; 36,4) - lectores (Nep. Att. 14,1; Gell. NA 3,19,1: servus assistens mensae eius - sc. Favorini - legere …

Lectus

(4 words)

see Kline

Lecythus

(40 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
[German version] (Λήκυθος; Lḗkythos). In 423 BC the Spartan commander Brasidas conquered the fort of L. - mentioned only in Thuc. 4,113-116 - in the area of the town of Torone on the Chalcidic peninsula. Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)

Leda

(439 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin)
[German version] (Λήδα; Lḗda). Daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius and of Eurythemis (Apollod. 1,7,10), sister of Althaea [1] and Hypermestra [1] (Hes. Cat. fr. 23a, 3-5; Apollod. ibid.), wife of the Lacedaemonian king Tyndareos. She is credited with different children: Timandra, Clytaemnestra, Phylonoe (Hes. Cat. fr. 23a, 7-10; Apollod. 3,10,6), Phoebe (Eur. IA 49-51), especially Helene [1] and the Dioscuri Castor and Polydeuces. According to Homer, these are the sons of Tyndareos (Hom. …

Leek

(608 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
and other Alliaceae [German version] I. Mesopotamia, Egypt, Asia Minor The numerous Sumerian and Akkadian expressions for Alliaceae, not all of which can be definitely botanically identified, partly refer only to the subspecies leek, shallot, onion or garlic [1. 301]. Leek in its various forms - Sumerian *karaš, Akkadian kar( a) šu, Hebrew kārēš, Aramaic karrāttā, Arabic kurrāṯu - is a word of Oriental culture. Garlic is in Sumerian, sum, Akkadian šūmū, otherwise in Semitic languages ṯūm; the onion is in Akkadian šamaškillū

Lefkandi

(470 words)

Author(s): Janje, Kristina (Tübingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Dark Ages | Mycenaean culture and archaeology A Bronze and Iron Age settlement with necropoleis located north of the modern settlement of Lefkandi on the southwest coast of Euboea [1]. The settlement mound with the modern name of Xeropolis is located halfway between Eretria [1] and Chalcis [1] at the edge of the Lelantine Plain and was almost continuously settled from the early Bronze Age (Early Helladic II) to the 10th/9th cents. BC (late Protogeo…

Legacy

(81 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The technical term legacy in modern law is a literal translation of the Roman legatum . In the testamentary settlement of the succession of property rights after death, Roman law differentiated between the appointment of the fully valid legal successor as heir ( heres, for this see Succession, law of III.) - or several heirs - and the allocation of individual objects as legacies. Other ancient laws contain no comparable construction. Fideicommissum; Testament [2] IV. …

Legal claim

(860 words)

Author(s): Ranieri, Filippo (Saarbrücken RWG)
[English version] In medieval and common law jurisprudence and legal practice, the word actio, that is, a claim for litigation in a formulary procedure, was no longer used with the meaning it had in Classical Roman law. Justinian sources had, to a large extent, already abandoned the procedural function of the Roman system of actions. Because of their unhistorical use of Roman sources, the Glossators could no longer understand the procedural importance of the Roman actiones. There is, however, a controversy in legal-historical research over the extent to which the thoug…

Legal koine

(401 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] As with the koine in Greek historical linguistics, legal koine (LK) refers to a phenomenon of Hellenism analyzed by legal history after the event: the spontaneous merging of various Greek legal concepts, especially in Ptolemaic Egypt. Institutions of different poleis ( Polis) blended there in the legal world through the mingling of elements of the Greek population among each other [4. 140] without the authorities working towards unity (in this way also in [3. 50 f.]). As examples…

Legal pluralism

(394 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] After the conquest of Egypt by Alexander [4] the Great (331 BC), the native population continued to live with its traditional legal concepts as they are preserved in documents ( Demotic law) and perhaps laws ( Codex Hermopolis). The elite of Ptolemaic Egypt, which originated from Greek mercenaries and immigrants, regulated its private affairs according to its own concepts that had merged into a legal koine. Only the Greek towns of Naucratis, Alexandria [1] and Ptolemais [3] ha…

Legal texts in cuneiform

(10 words)

see Cuneiform, legal texts in

Legatio

(723 words)

Author(s): Kehne, Peter (Hannover)
[German version] The activity of a legatus . 1) In international law, a government-ordered, occasional delegation of usually three or more legati - as messengers or provided with full authority - who acted as official representatives of Rome and reported to the Senate ( legationem renuntiare: Liv. 39,33,1). Legationes presented, for example, the demand for satisfaction ( rerum rep…

Legatum

(797 words)

Author(s): Manthe, Ulrich (Passau)
[German version] In Roman law, the legacy (from legare: ‘to pronounce a binding declaration of will’, lex ). The possibility of bequeathing someone property through testamentary disposition ( Will…

Legatus

(455 words)

Author(s): Kehne, Peter (Hannover)
[German version] (‘sent on the basis of a law’ [6. 11]). 1) Envoy in international relations of Rome, outside of Italy with the functions of fetiales within the framework of a legatio [3. 1133-1…

Legend

(4 words)

Leges agrariae

(6 words)

see Lex, leges

Leges Barbarorum

(5 words)

see Volksrecht

Leges Homeritarum

(218 words)

Author(s): Toral-Niehoff, Isabel (Freiburg)
[German version] ‘The law of the (rather: for the) Himyarites’ (Latin Homeritae, an Arab tribe ruling Yemen between the 3rd and 6th cent. AD), a collection falsely attributed to bishop Gregentius of Ẓafar. However, it is not a genuine southern Arabian law code but a Byzantine literary work of the 6th cent. AD reflecting the administration and urban life of the empire under consideration of certain peculiarities of Himyar [1. 567-620]. Together with the ‘Martyrium of Arethas’ [2], the

Leges regiae

(6 words)

see Lex, Leges

Leges sacrae

(6 words)

see Ecclesiastical/Religious law

Legio

(5,549 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] A. Republic In early times, the Roman military contingent probably consisted of 3,000 soldiers in total, each of the three tribus of the royal era providing 1,000 men (Varro, Ling. 5,89) - a military force described as ‘the levy’ ( legio). The division of the Roman people into six classes of wealth, ascribed by historiographical tradition to Servius Tullius (Liv. 1,42,4-43,13; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,15-18) also had a military purpose: a citizen's assets dictated with which weapons he was to equip himself. Those without property ( capite censi) were excluded from mili…

Legis actio

(600 words)

Author(s): Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin)
[German version] The legis actio (LA) was the earliest form of Roman civil procedure and, therefore, characterized by considerable formality. It owed its name to a law from which the suit received its immutability but which Gaius (Inst. 4,11) was already at a loss to explain entirely. The formalities that had to be observed in this type of…

Legislation

(262 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] in antiquity is both the subject of pragmatic politics ( Law, codification) and theoretical reflection (political science and legal philosophy). The latter was first discussed by the Greeks (as

Legumes

(6 words)

see Nutrition, Leguminous plants

Leguminous plants (pulses)

(237 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] ( ervum, Columella 2,10,34 et passim, Plin. HN 18,57; 18, 139 et passim; ervilia, Plin. HN 18,58 et passim; Columella 2,13,1; ὄροβος/ órobos, related to ἐρέβινθος/ erébinthos ‘peas’). Collective name for small-seed leg…

Leibethra

(156 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Λείβεθρα; Leíbethra). Macedonian city between Dion [II 2] and Heracleon [2] near modern Leptokarya (cf. Str. 7, fr. 18); its territorium bordered on Gonni [1. no. 2]. In the 3rd cent. BC, L. was considered to be autonomous as it received Delphian theōroí (‘envoys’) [2. 17 l. 52], but it obviously became merged with the Roman colony of Dion [II 2] (CIL III 591). According to Str. 9,2,25, L. was sacred to the Muses; Pausanias heard in Larisa the story that Orpheus had been buried in L. but after a severe flood his bones had been taken to Dion (Paus. 9,30,9-11). According to Plut. Alexander 14,5, there was a portrait of Orpheus…

Leiden System

(156 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Agreement of 1931 regarding the use of text-critical symbols in the apparatus of editions of Greek and Latin texts, papyri, inscriptions, etc. The most important of these are square brackets [ ] for marking the supplementation of no longer extant letters, round brackets ( ) for resolving ancient abbreviations, and curving brackets   so that letters incorrectly placed by the scribe can be eliminated and double brackets [[ ]] to mark symbols that were deliberately erased in ancie…

Leimone

(11 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
[German version] Daughter of Hippomenes [2]. Walde, Christine (Basle)…

Leinie

(47 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] Etruscan nomen gentile from Volsinii/Orvieto, passed down epigraphically and pictorially over several generations in the Tomba Golini I (4th cent. BC) there. Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) Bibliography J. Heurgon, Un legatus à Volsinii, in: MEFRA 86, 1974, 707-721 S. Steingräber (ed.), Etr. Wandmalerei, 1985, 286.

Leiodes

(75 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Ληώδης, Λειώδης; Lēṓdēs, Leiṓdēs). The son of Oenops, priest. He is one of Penelope's suitors, whom he loathes, however, keeping to himself. L. is the first suitor to try…

Leipsydrium

(110 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)

Leisure

(1,560 words)

Author(s): Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
[German version] I. Definition The terms σχολή ( scholḗ; Lat . schola, scola) and otium, which had equivalent meanings in Greek and Latin, have a wide spectrum of meaning; they could indicate any form of free time not used for labour or other occupations, but also the time dedicated to people or certain activities. From a sociological point of view, the term provides clear insights into essential elements of the Gr…

Leitourgia

(4 words)

see Liturgy

Leitus

(101 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (Λήϊτος; Lḗïtos). Son of Alector [4], a Boeotian hero; he has a tomb and cult in Plataeae (Paus. 9,4,3). He is integrated into several Panhellenic narrative cycles: he is one of the leaders of the Boeotians outside Troy, distinguishes himself occasionally and is wounded slightly - in the battle for the corpse of Patroclus - by Hector, returns to his homeland; he wooes Helene [1] and takes part in the expedition of the Argonauts (Hom. Il. 2,494; 17,601; Eur. IA 259; Catalogues: Apollod. 1,113; 3,130). …

Lekane, Lekanis

(9 words)

see Pottery, shapes and types of

Lekanomanteia

(4 words)

see Divination

Lekythos

(2 words)

Lekythos

(391 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ λήκυθος; hē lḗkythos). Greek generic term for ointment and oil vessels of various shapes and sizes with a narrow opening, also comprising the alabastron and aryballos ; based on schol. Pl. Hp. mi. 368C, today in particular a term for Attic funerary vessels from the 6th and 5th cents. BC that contained aromatic oil donations and were a popular gift for the dead ( Vessel, shapes and types of fig. E 3). As the white-ground

Lelante

(51 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Ληλάντη; Lēlántē). Wife of the mythological Molossian king Munichus and mother of Alcander among others. When the god-fearing family is attacked by robbers and their house is set alight, they are transformed into birds by Zeus so they can be saved (Antoninus Liberalis 14). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lelantine War

(412 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne)
[German version] Modern term for a military dispute between the Euboean cities of Chalcis [1] and Eretria [1] over the Lelantine Plain ( Lēlántion pedíon ) situated between their respective territories. Today the conflict is generally dated to the period around 700 BC. The Lelantine War (LW) obviously dragged out over several decades. The surrender of the city of Lefkandi on the eastern edge of the plain that is dated to c. 700 on the basis of archaeological findings was probably a consequence of the war. The LW is first mentioned in Archilochus. There he states t…

Lelantion pedion

(90 words)

Author(s): Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich)
[German version] (Λέλαντον, Ληλάντιον or Ληλάντου πεδίον; Lélanton, Lēlántion or Lēlántou pedíon). Fertile plain between Chalcis and Eretria, the possession of which was the object of the ‘Lelantine War’ at the beginning of the …

Leleges

(380 words)

Author(s): Gschnitzer, Fritz (Heidelberg)
[German version] (Λέλεγες; Léleges). Name of a non-Greek people in the early history of Greece and Asia Minor, attested from Homer, Hesiod and Alcaeus, primarily, however, in the historical and mythological literature from the classical period. At the beginning there were memories of a historical people with certain settlement areas; Greek scholars then shifted the people, because they were non-Greek (= pre-Greek), to the distant past beyond all th…

Lembus

(4 words)

see Navigation

Lemnian

(207 words)

Author(s): Rix, Helmut (Freiburg)
[German version] A non-Greek language is attested on Lemnos in the north-eastern Aegean from the period before Attic colonization (500 BC) (two texts - of 32 words - on a funerary stele, nine texts/fragments on vessels). Lemnian is similar to Etruscan in its sound system, morphology and syntax (e.g. in the dating formula: Lemnian holaie-s-i φ okias-ial-e serona-i θ ‘ during the S. office of H. Ph.’ like Etruscan lar θ -ial-e hul χ nie-s-i munsl-e ‘ during the M. office of L.H.’, with the locative to the genitive form; Lemnian and Etruscan -m ‘but’), however it is not identical to it (e.…

Lemnian women, Hypsipyle

(433 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier)
[German version] (Ὑψιπύλη, -λεια; Hypsipýlē, - leia). The myth that was originally perhaps autonomous [1. 235f.] and was then interw…
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