Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Maevius

(112 words)

Author(s): Fündling, Jörg (Bonn)
Rare Italian proper name, variant of Mevius . [German version] [1] Accomplice of Verres in Sicily Accomplice of Verres in Sicily (Cic. Verr. 2,3,175), perhaps the scribe who received gifts from Verres (2,3,176; 181; 185; 187). Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) [German version] [2] Centurio of Octavian Centurio of Octavian, caught in 30 BC at Alexandria by Mark Antony, urged in vain to change sides and released out of respect (Val. Max. 3,8,8). Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) [German version] [3] M., M. Fell in battle as military tribune in 203 BC Fell in battle in upper Italy in 203 BC as military tribu…

Maezaei

(189 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] (Μαιζαῖοι; Maizaîoi, Ptol. 2,16,5; Μαζαῖοι; Mazaîoi, Str. 7,5,3; Cass. Dio 55,32,4; Mazaei, Plin. HN 3,142; Maezei in inscriptions). Tribe to the north of Dalmatia near the Dalmatian-Pannonian border. According to Plin., Ptol. and Cass. Dio, it belonged to the Dalmatini, according to Str. to the Pannonii. The Pannonian origin of the M. is more probable although they were attached to the conventus Salonitanus (‘legal district of Salona’). Their extensive area was subjugated by the Romans in 12 BC. They formed a peregrine tribal district that was administered by a praef…

Magadis

(5 words)

see Musical instruments

Magalus

(47 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Greek Μάγιλος; Mágilos). Celtic name from maglo-, ‘prince’ [1. 234]. Chief of the Boii who offered himself to Hannibal [4] in 217 BC as an ally and leader for the crossing of the Alps (Pol. 3,44,5; Liv. 21,29,6). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Schmidt.

Magarsa

(126 words)

Author(s): Sayar, Mustafa H. (Cologne)
[German version] (Μάγαρσα; Mágarsa). Settlement on the righthand bank of the Sarus in the region of Mallus, 4 km south-west of the modern district capital of Karataş in Cilicia Pedias on Cape Karataş in Dört Direkli where the sanctuary to Athena Magarsia was situated. After the end of Persian rule, M. first belonged to the empire of Alexander, then to the Seleucid kingdom. In the 2nd cent. BC, M. with Mallus was renamed Antioch on the Pyramus. From AD 72 finally in the Roman province of Cilicia. An…

Magas

(587 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(Μάγας; Mágas). [German version] [1] Father of Berenice Father of Berenice [1]. Ameling, Walter (Jena) Bibliography Geyer, s.v. M., RE 14, 292f. [German version] [2] Administrator of Cyrenaea, 3rd cent. BC M. was born no later than 320 BC as the son of Philippus and Berenice [1], perhaps the brother of Theoxene (PP VI 14511), who married Agathocles [2] after 300 (there was no adoption by Ptolemy I: SEG 18, 743; on a house belonging to him in Alexandria cf. [1. 287]). M. reconquered the seceded Cyrene for Ptolemaeus I shortly …

Magdala

(650 words)

Author(s): Pahlitzsch, Johannes (Berlin) | Kühne, Hartmut (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Harbour town on the north-western bank of Lake Genezareth (Greek Μαγδαλά; Magdalá < Hebrew Migdal Numayyā, ‘Tower’, Arabic al-Maǧdal). Harbour town on the north-western bank of Lake Genezareth, also known as Taricheai because of the production of saltwater fish there. Founded in the Hasmonean period ( Hasmoneans), Hellenized M. developed into one of the largest cities of Galilaea with a hippodrome and a stadium. Under emperor Nero, M. was annexed to the kingdom of Herod II Agrippa ( Iulius [II 5]). During th…

Mageia

(5 words)

see Magic, Magi

Magi

(116 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Fort in north-western Britannia (Not. Dign. Occ. 40,14; 40,49) with a numerus Pacensium as a garrison (4th cent. AD). Site contentious but an altar (CIL VII 1291) built by vik(ani) Mag... in Old Carlisle refers to it. It is, however, conceivable that M. was the fort in Burrow Walls and Maglona was the one in Old Carlisle (Not. Dign. Occ. 40,13; 40,29). Both forts were held right through to the 4th cent. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography E. Birley, The Roman Fort and Settlement at Old Carlisle, in: Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeolog…

Magia Polla

(46 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] (also Maia). Mother of the poet Vergilius, of lowly birth. Her dream of the birth of Virgil in Suetonius (Suet. De viris illustribus, Vergilius 1-3). Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) Bibliography G. Brugnoli, Phocas, Vita di Vergilio, 1984 Id. (ed.), Vitae Vergilianae antiquae, 1997.

Magic

(3,646 words)

Author(s): Stuckrad, Kocku Von (Erfurt RWG)
Stuckrad, Kocku Von (Erfurt RWG) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) The discussions in Antiquity surrounding mageia/magia, goêteia, carmen etc. produced a multitude of possible interpretations, thereby making it virtually impossible to give a general description of what was meant by magic. A survey of its conceptual history also can do no more than descriptively apprehend magic's various aspects without aiming at forcing a sort of uniformity [27]. Furthermore, the concept of magic - closely related to the con…

Magical papyri

(1,407 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster)
[German version] I. General information Loose term for the constantly increasing body of Graeco-Egyptian magic texts (standard editions: [1; 2], since then, newly published texts in [3]). The most important distinction is to be made between the handbooks (until now more than 80 published copies) on papyrus, which contain the instructions for acts of magic, and directly used texts (at least 115 published copies) on papyrus, metal (lead tablets), pottery shards, wood, etc., corresponding to the extant …

Magical spells

(1,227 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster)
(ὀνόματα βάρβαρα/ onómata bárbara, Lat. nomina barbarica). [German version] I. General Broad term for names, words and sounds used in ancient incantation practices of ritual magic and popular medicine. Their obscurity or indefiniteness was often understood by ancient observers as a synecdoche for the otherness of magic, above all in poetical depictions of fictional witchcraft rituals (e.g. Lucan, 6,685-693; Lucian, Dialogi Meretricii 4,5). From the magician's perspective, such utterances underpinned his au…

Magic doll

(426 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster)
[German version] Loose term for an anthropomorphous statuette made from a variety of different materials for specific ritual purposes. The conceptual condition for such statuettes, which function as signs or images of a physical and social existence, is the context-contingent abolishment of the difference between living creatures and objects that are incapable of self-determination [1]. Such statuettes were used for beneficial as well as harmful purposes in the ancient Oriental empires, while in M…

Magicians

(4 words)

see Entertainers

Magic, Magi

(7,505 words)

Author(s): Wiggermann, Frans (Amsterdam) | Wandrey, Irina (Berlin) | Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Thür, Gerhard (Graz) | Et al.
I. Ancient Orient [German version] A. General The magic of the ancient Orient and of Egypt is based on a view of the world that runs counter to that of religion. In the world-view of magic, men, gods and demons are tied to each other and to the cosmos by sympathies and antipathies, whereas in the religious world view everything is created by the gods for their own purposes; the relations between men and the cosmos are the result of deliberate actions of the gods. In the practice of religion, however, b…

Magic Medicine

(7 words)

see Magic, Magi; Medicine

Magister a memoria

(277 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Lat. memoria (Greek mnḗmē) refers to official issuing of documents in the sense of ‘lasting testimonial’ (cf. Aristot. Pol. 1321b 39: mnḗmones). It is accepted that from the time of Augustus an official sphere a memoria existed for the various official activities of the emperor to his court. Its head is, however, not mentioned until the 2nd cent. AD as magister a memoria or magister memoriae; this title survives until late antiquity (ILS 1672; Pan. Lat. 9,11 Baehrens; Cod. Iust. 1,23,7,1). The office head was initially a freedman, later a membe…

Magister equitum

(385 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The office of the magister equitum (ME) (‘Master of the Cavalry’) was an office assigned to the dictator , and was never an independent office. Like the original designation of the dictator as magister populi (Master of the Infantry) (Cic. Rep. 1,40,63; Varro Ling. 5,82), it contains the word magister (root mag- = ‘head, leader’) and an indication of the original function as cavalry leader ( equites ). The ME was appointed by the dictator as deputy (Liv. 8,32,1-8) for the period of his dictatorship. Appointment by a consul (Cass. Dio 42,21) or by …

Magister (ludi)

(7 words)

see School III. Rome
▲   Back to top   ▲