Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Satire

(1,304 words)

Author(s): Braund, Susanna (London)
[German version] I. Genre As a modern concept, satire denotes a witty and critical approach which can be found in any type of literature or art: “the playfully critical distortion of the familiar” (Feinberg). In antiquity, the term denoted the Roman literary genre of satura as discussed by Quintilian (Inst. 10,1,93) and known to us through the works of Horace, Persius and Juvenal. The genre must be distinguished from other works which feature satirical passages, including Aristophanes [3], Herodas, Plautus, Lucretius, Horace's Epodes and Seneca's Epistles. Quintilian's statem…

Satire

(2,847 words)

Author(s): Brummack, Jürgen
Brummack, Jürgen [German version] A. Introduction (CT) Satire is a noteworthy example of a continuous tradition extending from Late Antiquity to the Modern Period. Its foundation is the reception of Horace, Persius and Juvenal as well as scholia of Late Antiquity and remarks by grammarians. This material is also the basis of the theoretical development of the subject. Although the Menippea was, for the most part, only later involved, by the 16th cent. it had become extremely influential. The tense rel…

Satirical (mocking) poems

(8 words)

see Iambographers; Invective; Parody

Satis

(150 words)

Author(s): von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin)
[German version] (Σάτις/ Sátis, Egyptian Sṯ.t), Anuket and Chnum (Chnubis [1]) are the three chief deities of the island of Elephantine. The temple of S. on Elephantine is archeologically attested as early as the Early Dynastic Period (from c. 2800 BC) [1]. S. is depicted as a woman wearing a crown with horns. Because of the phonological similarity of S. and Sothis, the two goddesses were identified with one another in the Late Period (713-332 BC) [2]. This connection is reinforced by the association of Sothis with the flooding of …

Satisdatio

(197 words)

Author(s): Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin)
[German version] In Roman law, satisdatio (the giving of a security) constituted a special form of the cautio (warranty). Anyone obliged to the satisdatio had to provide a guarantor at regular intervals (Dig. 2,8,1). The guarantor had to be idoneus (“fit”, i.e. solvent); this could be established by an arbiter (a judge with administrative discretion) (Dig. 2,8,9 and 10 pr). It was also a fundamental requirement that the bondsman was of the same legal status as the party furnishing security. Cases in which a satisdatio could be arranged by the praetor or where it was even prescribed ipso ju…

Satnioeis

(96 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Σατνιόεις; Satnióeis). River in Troas (Hom. Il. 6,34; 14,445; 21,87), modern Tuzla Çayı, rises on the southwestern slopes of the Ida [2], near Gargara. It was on the S. that Homer's city of Pedasus [3] is supposed to have been (cf. Str. 13,1,50). At Assus the S. is only about 2 km from the sea; it then proceeds west and reaches the sea between Hamaxitus and Larisa [5] near Gülpınar. Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography L. Bürchner, s. v. S, RE 2 A 1, 79 f.  W. Leaf, Strabo on the Troad, 1923, 250-253  J. M. Cook, The Troad, 1973, 245 f.

Saton

(65 words)

Author(s): Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[German version] (σάτον/ sáton, Latin satum; seā) is a Hebrew capacity measure for liquids and dry goods. Its volume varies in time and place between 20 and 24 loghim (Log; Hin; Sextarius) and corresponds to roughly 9.1-13.1 litres. During the Roman period the s. was equated with 1 1/2 Italic modii ( Modius [3]) (Jos. Ant. Iud. 9,85; less often 1 1/4 modii). Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)

Satorninus

(193 words)

Author(s): Löhr, Winrich Alfried (Cambridge)
[German version] (Σατορνεῖλος/ Satorneîlos, Σατορνῖνος/ Satornînos, Latin Saturninus). Christian teacher at the time of the emperor Hadrian (first half of the 2nd century AD) in Antioch [1] (Euseb. Hist. eccl. 4,7,3; cf. also Hippolytus, Refutatio omnium haeresium 7,28), who was considered a heretic (Heresy; Gnosis). According to Eirenaeus [2] of Lyon, Adversus haereses 1,24,1-2, his doctrine presented as the supreme principle the unknown Father, creator of the angels. According to S., Man, as the 'ima…

Sator square

(746 words)

Author(s): Hofmann, Heinz (Tübingen)
[German version] Latin graffito of 5 rows of 5 letters, which can be read as a palindrome from all four sides and in all four directions: R O T A S     S A T O R     O P E R A     A R E P O     T E N E T     T E N E T     A R E P O     O P E R A     S A T O R     R O T A S     Fig. 1     While the 10 attested 1st-3rd century AD examples begin with ROTAS, those from late antiquity and the Byzantine period (some also in Greek letters) and from mediaeval and modern times start with SATOR. Finds are distributed over the whole of the Roman empire (Cirencester, Manchester, Aquincum, Dura-Europus, Ro…

Satrae

(89 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Σάτραι; Sátrai). Thracian tribe on the northern coast of the Aigaion Pelagos (Aegaean) between Nestus and Strymon on the northeastern slopes of the Pangaeum, whose ore deposits they exploited (Hdt. 7,112; possibly also meant by  Σατροκένται/ Satrokéntai in Hecat. FGrH 1 F 181). The Edones are recorded as being there from 475 BC onwards (Hdt. 9,75). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography 1 J. N. Jurukova, Monetite na trakijskite plemena i vladeteli (Monetni sakrovista ot balgarskite zemi), 1992, 16 2 I. von Bredow, Stammesnamen und Stammeswir…

Satrap

(933 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] (Old Persian ḫšaçapāvan-, 'protector of the kingdom/dynasty', Elamic šá-ak-šá-ba-ma, Akkadian aḫšadrapanu, Imperial Aramaic ḥšatrapan, Greek usually σατράπης/ satrápēs [9]; Latin satrapa, -es, satraps). Title of a Persian-Achaemenid (seminal: [3]), later also Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanid provincial governor (Parthian ḥštrp / ḫšahrap/; Middle Persian štrp / šahrap/). The title appears first in the Bīsutūn inscription of Darius [1] I [11. DB III 14.56], where it denotes two appointees of the new king in Bactria and Arachosi…

Satrapes

(397 words)

Author(s): Röllig, Wolfgang (Tübingen)
[German version] [1] (title) see Satrap (Persian-Achaemenid title) see Satrap Röllig, Wolfgang (Tübingen) [German version] [2] Graecized name of the Canaanite god Šadrapa' (Σατράπης/ Satrápēs; Σαδράπης/ Sadrápēs). Graecized name of the Canaanite god Šadrapa, worshipped from North Africa to Babylonia esp. in the Hellenistic-Roman period. The Greek form of the name, probably chosen in allusion to the Old Persian title ḫšaθra ('protector of the land'), is known from two inscriptions of Maād near Byblus (dated 8 BC and the…

Satrap revolt

(370 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] Several risings of Persian satraps against the central authority of the Great Kings are documented, esp. in the late 5th and 4th cents. BC (e.g. Megabyzus [2], Pissuthnes, Amorges, Cyrus [3] the Younger), but the term SR usually refers to the main phase (late 360s, called 'Great' by Diod. Sic. 15,90 ff, esp. 93,1) of the revolts against Artaxerxes [2] II (370s-350s). According to this source, it was characterized by joint action ( koinopragía) among numerous satraps (and peoples) of Asia Minor, support of these by the Egyptian Tachos and by the Sparta…

Satricum

(276 words)

Author(s): Morciano, Maria Milvia (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Latini, Latium City in Latium on the road from Antium to Velitrae, near modern Borgo Montello to the northeast of Anzio. Traces of settlement from the 10th century BC on. In the 7th/6th century BC an Etruscan foundation. In the 5th/4th century BC S. was a settlement of the  Volsci, who participated in the battle of Lacus Regillus on the side of the Latini (Dion. Hal. ant.  5,61,3). S. was destroyed twice in the course of the Roman-Latin …

Satrius

(208 words)

Author(s): Bartels, Jens (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Italian, presumably a family name from Etruria (Schulze 80; 225). Cf. also Satyrius. I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] S., M. As the son of L. Minucius Basilus's sister, he was adopted by him, but was bypassed by means of a forged will (Cic. Off. 3,73 f.; Minucius [I 4]). In 44/43 BC he is recorded as patron of the Picentes and Sabines and a follower of M. Antonius [I 9] (Cic. Off. 3,74; Cic. Phil. 2,107). He cannot be identified with the legate of C. Trebonius in Cicero (Ad Brut. 1,6,3). Bartels, Jens (Bonn) II. Imperial period [German version] [II 1] S. Rufus Senator in the reign of …

Satureius

(32 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Tr. pl. in 133 BC, in a fight was the first to hit Ti. Sempronius [I 16] Gracchus with a chair leg (Plut. Ti. Gracchus 19,10). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)

Saturius Firmus

(54 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Senator, cos. suff. in 148 AD (FO2 51). His father (or grandfather) of the same name, probably mentioned in Plin. Ep. 4,15,3, was married to a daughter of the senator Asinius Rufus (cf. [1]) and this eased his rise to senatorial status. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 Syme, RP 7, 604.

Saturnalia

(963 words)

Author(s): Distelrath, Götz (Constance)
[German version] Roman festival of Saturnus on December 17. In the Republican Fasti Antiates maiores, the day of the Saturnalia was qualified as EN, whereas in the Augustan Fasti Amiterni it was marked NP and was therefore designated as feriae (‘holidays’; Fasti). It seems plausible to see this change in the context of Caesar's calendar reform as an acknowledgement of the significance of the festival, which had been rising from the end of the 3rd cent. BC onwards (Calendar B.4.). Concerning the duration of the Satu…

Saturnia

(221 words)

Author(s): Miller, Martin (Berlin)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Socii (Roman confederation) | Umbri, Umbria | Coloniae | Regio, regiones A small town, nowadays insignificant, on the River Albegna in the hinterland of Volci/Vulci. According to Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1,20 and Plin. HN 3,52, S. was called Aurinia in the Etruscan Period; with the institution of a Roman military prefecture after 280 BC its name was changed to S. In the 6th cent. BC, after the decline of Marsiliana d'Albegna (perhaps Caletra), the agrarian se…

Saturninus

(490 words)

Author(s): Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Gutsfeld, Andreas (Münster) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin)
[German version] [1-2] See Ap(p)uleius [I 10-11]. Franke, Thomas (Bochum) [German version] [3] Emperor for a short time, 3rd cent. Was elevated to emperor by the army at the time of Gallienus, but killed by the soldiers a short time afterwards because of his severity (SHA Tyr. Trig. 23; cf. SHA Firmus 11,1; SHA Gall. 9,1). Franke, Thomas (Bochum) Bibliography Kienast 2, 230  PLRE 1, 805 no. 1. [German version] [4] Imperator Caesar C. Iulius S. Augustus of Moorish extraction, followed a military career (Zos. 1,66,1; SHA Quatt. tyr. 9,5; Zon. 12,29), until Aurelianus [3] appointed him dux l…
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