Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Saturnus

(1,184 words)

Author(s): Mastrocinque, Attilio (Verona)
[German version] A. Name and characteristics The Roman god S. or Saeturnus (ILLRP 255; Fest. 432 f. L.), whose name is formed like Juturna and Manturna, is etymologically connected with sator ('sower') by various ancient authors (Varro, Ling. 5,64; Aug. Civ. 6,8; 7,13,19; Tert. Ad nat. 2,12; Arnob. 4,9; Fest. 432 L.; Macrob. Sat. 1,10,20) and some modern scholars, although his festival did not fall in the sowing season. The derivation from saturare (Cic. Nat. D. 2,64; 3,62) stemmed from the fact that his feast day was the 17th December, when the yearly cycle 'was co…

Satyr

(1,533 words)

Author(s): Heinze, Theodor (Geneva) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
(Σάτυρος/ Sátyros, pl. Σάτυροι/ Sátyroi, Latin Satur, Satyrus), also Silenus (Σι-, Σειληνός/ Si-, Seilēnós, pl. Σι-, Σειληνοί/ Si-, Seilēnoí, Doric Σιλανός/ Silanós, Latin Silenus, Silanus). [German version] I. Mythology, art and cult A satyr/Silenus was a member of a group of demons who, since their relatively late emergence at the end of the 7th/beginning of the 6th cent. BC, have formed part of the mythical entourage of the god Dionysus; Silens, as a more or less distinctive and independent figure, emerged from that retinue…

Satyrion

(41 words)

Author(s): Hidber, Thomas (Berne)
[German version] (Σατυρίων/ Satyríōn). Poet of New Comedy (3rd century BC), known only from an epigraphic mention in the list of victors at the Dionysia, in which S. appears with one victory [1]. Hidber, Thomas (Berne) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 590.

Satyrius

(133 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Σατύριος; Satýrios). Epigrammatist of uncertain identity, perhaps identifiable with Satyrus [9]: the only surviving poem, Anth. Pal. 6,11, is attributed by the Anthologia Planudea to one S. (name rarely attested), but by the Anthologia Palatina to a Satrius, not recorded elsewhere (possibly the Italic gens name Satrius? cf. [2]). Content: dedication to Pan by a hunter, a bird catcher and a fisherman (theme of 14 further epigrams from the 3rd cent. BC until the 6th cent. AD, parodied by Lucianus, perhaps Lucillius…

Satyr play

(1,196 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
(σατυρικὸν δρᾶμα, satyrikòn drâma). [German version] A. Origins As in the case of Greek tragedy, the debate on the origins of the SP also starts with an observation in Aristotle's Poetics. According to Aristot. Poet. 1449a 19 ff., tragedy had initially dealt with minor topics in a humorous language and only later acquired its appropriate solemnity, because it had developed from the satyresque (ἐκ σατυρικοῦ, ek satyrikoû) and its original nature had been more that of a dance (ὀρχηστικωτέρα, orchēstikōtéra). Aristotle thus did not claim in any way that tragedy had developed…

Satyrus

(1,465 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Knell, Heiner (Darmstadt) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Blume, Horst-Dieter (Münster) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Et al.
(Σάτυρος/ Sátyros). [German version] [1] S. I King of the regnum Bosporanum from 433/2 to 389/8 BC. Son of Spartocus I. S.' co-regent may have been (until 393/2) his brother Seleucus [1]. S. directed his attention at the Asiatic coast of the Cimmerian Bosporus (Bosporus [2]). He restored the Sindian King Hecataeus following a revolt, and allied with him through a dynastic marriage. S.'s divorced wife then sent the King of the Ixomates against him (Polyaenus, Strat. 8,55). S. died during the siege of Theodosia. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography V. F. Gajdukevič, Da…

Sauconna

(60 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Name of the river usually called Arar, modern Saône, literarily attested only since Late Antiquity (cf. Amm. Marc. 15,11,17: Ararim quem Sauconnam appellant, 'Arar which is called S.'; Avitus, Epist. 83 = MGH AA 6,2). The name had been recorded earlier, however, e.g. as a term for dea Souconna in Châlon-sur-Sâone (ILS 9516). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)

Saufeius

(145 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Bartels, Jens (Bonn)
Italic nomen gentile. The family was from the ancient local aristocracy of Praeneste (CIL I2 279-290; 1467-1471; 2439) and is attested in Rome itself and as traders on Delos from the end of the 2nd cent. BC onwards (RRC 204). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [1] S., L. Appears in Cicero's letters 67-44 BC as an Epicurean (Cic. Att. 7,2,4) and a friend of Pomponius [I 5] Atticus (Cic. Att. 7,1,1). In 43 the latter rescued S., who had been proscribed because of his wealth  (Nep. Att. 12,3). Bartels, Jens (Bonn) [German version] [2] S., M. Leader of Annius [I 14] Milo's followe…

Saumacus

(106 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] Killer of Paerisades [6] V, who surrendered the Regnum Bosporanum to Mithridates [6] VI. According to the decree honouring Diophantus [2] (IOSPE 12 no. 352, 34-35), S. had begun a rebellion with the Scythae, which gripped the European part of the empire. He was captured by Diophantus and handed over to Mithridates. This rebellion was evidently directed against the new political leadership. The view that S. was a slave is based on a wrong translation. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography A. Gavrilov, Skify Savmaka - vosstanie ili vtorženie?, i…

Sauromaces

(140 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] A pro-Roman king of Iberia [1] who was expelled in AD 368/9 by Sapor [2] II (Amm. Marc. 27,12,4). In 370, Valens [2] had S. brought back by Terentius [II 1], and Aspacures, S.' pro-Persian cousin, arranged for the territory along the Cyrus [5] to be divided between them, so S. received only the part bordering on Armenia and the Lazi (Amm. Marc. 27,12,16 f.). This arrangement was approved by the emperor but aroused the anger of the great king, who wanted to maintain the rule of his…

Sauromates

(249 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
(Σαυρομάτης; Sauromátēs). Name of Bosporan kings; see also Sarmatae. [German version] [1] King of the Regnum Bosporanum, c. 100 AD King of the Regnum Bosporanum, AD 93/4-123/4, son of Rhescuporis II; S. conducted successful wars against the Scythae (IOSPE 22 26) and pirates in the area of the northern Pontos. Many new buildings in Gorgippia and Panticapaeum attest to the increase in prosperity under his rule. There was a column in honour of S. in Sinope (IOSPE 22 40). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) [German version] [2] King of the Regnum Bosporanum, c. 200 AD King of the Regnum …

Savaria

(198 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Christianity | | Coloniae | Limes | Pannonia | Rome | Rome Roman colony in Pannonia superior, modern Szombathely in western Hungary. Its location on the Amber Road (route Aquileia - Carnuntum) and good road connections to Arrabona and via Sopianae to Sirmium enabled a swift economic growth. Under Claudius [III 1] a colony was founded in S. ( Colonia Divi Claudii S.: Plin. HN 3,146), t ribus Claudia. Until AD 106 S. was the administrative centre of the province. As a centre of communications and admi…

Savincates

(60 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] Celtic tribe in the Alpes Cottiae, mentioned on the Augustus Arch in Segusio (CIL V 7231) and at the Mausoleum of Escoyères en Queyras (CIL XII 80). It can therefore presumably be located in the region to the southeast of  Briançon. Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg) Bibliography G. Barruol, Les peuples préromains du sud-est de la Gaule, 1969, 175-177, 356 f.

Savus

(81 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] (Σάουος; Sáouos). Right-hand tributary of the Danube in the south of  Pannonia (Plin. HN 3,128; 147 f.; Ptol. 2,16,1 f.; 3,9,1;  Str. 4,6,10; Geogr. Rav. 4,20), modern Sava (Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia). In its middle and lower reaches it was navigable. On its banks there were important communications nodes (Neviodunum, Siscia, Sirmium, Singidunum). S. was also worshipped as a river deity (CIL III, 4009). Burian, Jan (Prague) Bibliography TIR L 33 Tergeste, 1961, 65  TIR L 34 Budapest, 1968, 100.

Saxanus

(225 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] ( Saxsanus, also Saxsetanus). Epithet, primarily of Hercules. The name derives from Latin saxum, 'rock, stone'; Hercules S. was worshipped in the context of individual Italic or provincial Roman quarrying regions. The beginning of the worship of Hercules S. dates back to before the second half of the 1st century AD in central Italy (Tibur: CIL XIV 3543, the restoration of an older sanctuary in the Flavian period as a terminus ante quem), less likely in upper Italy (CIL V 5013). From Italy, the cult presumably came to Germany with some of the soldiers…

Saxa Rubra

(119 words)

Author(s): Morciano, Maria Milvia (Florence)
[German version] Statio on the right bank of the Tiberis at the ninth milestone of the via Flaminia (14,4 km to the north of Rome; SHA Sev. 8,9; Tab. Peut. 5,5: ad rubras), at a junction of the v ia Tiberina and another road in the direction of Veii (Mart. 4,64,15). It was named after the red tuff rocks that come close to the river at this point. There was a small tavern ( cauponula: Cic. Phil. 2,77) there. This is the place where Maxentius was defeated by Constantinus [1] the Great in AD 312 (Aur. Vict. 40,23). Nearby, at Prima Porta was Livia's [2] Villa ad Gallinas Albas. Morciano, Maria Milvia (Fl…

Saxones

(589 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Σάξονες/ Sáxones, the Saxons). Association of Germanic tribes, first mentioned at Ptol. 2,11,11. According to him, they settled in Holstein to the northeast of the lower Elbe; in the west their territory bordered the sea (Ptol. 2,11,31: three Saxon islands). Presumably the S. originated from the Reudigni and the Aviones (Tac. Germ. 40,2) [1]. They may have become known to the Romans earlier, possibly in 5 AD when a fleet sailed to the Cimbrian peninsula, yet Tacitus does not menti…

Scabris

(4 words)

see Salebro

Scadinavia

(155 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Name of an island of enormous size (Mela 3,54: S. a conjectural reading for Codannovia; Plin. HN 4,96; 8,39: S., various MSS: Scati-), which became known to the Romans during a naval expedition involving circumnavigation of Jutland in AD 5 (R. Gest. div. Aug. 26; Vell. Pat. 2,106,3; Plin. HN 2,167). In addition, Plin. HN 4,104 (following unnamed informants) incorrectly locates the Scandiae Islands to the north of Britain (cf. Ptol. 2,11,33). These designate primarily southern Sweden and the Danish isles (cf. also Ptol. 2,11,34: Σκανδίαι/ Skandíai with the main isla…

Scaeae

(93 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Σκαιαί/ Skaiaí sc. πύλαι/ pýlai). The 'Scaean Gate' in Troy (Hom. Il. 3,145; 3,149 et passim; without pýlai: Hom. Il. 3,263; Str. 13,1,21; in the singular: Quint. Smyrn. 11,338), also called Dardaníai. Several explanations of the name are possible: the 'left' or 'western gate' or 'gate of misfortune' (derived from  σκαιός [2]), 'crooked gate' or named after its builder Scaeus (schol. Hom. Il. 3,145; 9,354; 11,170 Bekker; Hsch. s. v. Σκαιῇσι πύλῃσιν) or after the Scaei [1] people. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography 1 L. Bürchner, s. v. Skaiisches Tor, RE 3 A, 424 2 LS…
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