Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Saetabis

(115 words)

Author(s): Ferrer Maestro, Juan José (Castellón)
[German version] Capital of the Contestani near the eastern coast of Spain on the great coastal road (Geogr. Rav. 304,4) on a high mountain (Sil. Pun. 3,373 celsa arce), in a fertile area, modern Játiva. From the end of the 3rd cent. BC onwards numerous coins with S. or Saiti. Mentioned in Plin. HN 3,25 as a municipium Augustum; in the Imperial period  S. was famous for its linen industry ( sudaria Saetaba, Catull. 12,14; Plin.  HN 19,9; Sil.  Pun.  loc. cit.). Ferrer Maestro, Juan José (Castellón) Bibliography Tovar 3, 211  H. Galsterer, Untersuchungen zum römischen Städtewesen auf d…

Saevinius

(103 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] L. S. Proculus, senator, perhaps of equestrian origin. On his career: AE 1969/70, 601 and IEph VII 1, 3037. After serving as praetor, he became the legate of the procos. of Asia on the insulae Cyclades, probably upon the special request of Marcus Aurelius and Verus, then i uridicus per Flaminiam et Transpadanam, legate of the legio XXX Ulpia in Xanten; praetorian governor of Cilicia, later of Galatia as well. Cos. suff. in c. AD 180. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography Alföldy, Konsulat 200; 345  W. Eck, Zur Verwaltungsgeschichte Italiens unter Marc Aurel, in: ZPE …

Saga

(4 words)

see Myth

Sagala

(120 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] (Σάγαλα/ Ságala, Ptol. 7,1,46; Old Indian Śākala, Middle Indian Sāgala). City in the Punjab east of Hydaspes, the capital city of the Indo-Greek king Menander [6] in Pāli Milindapañha. S. with its rectangular, probably Hellenistic city plan, was also called Euthydemia or Euthymedia, according to Ptol. l.c.. The city is also known in ancient Indo-Iranian literature (Mahābhārata etc.) and was visited in the 7th cent. AD by the Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang. Its exact location is not known (perhap…

Sagalassus

(272 words)

Author(s): Brandt, Hartwin (Chemnitz)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Alexander | Pompeius (Σαγαλασσός; Sagalassós). A city to the north of modern Ağlasun at an elevation of about 1500 m in the central Taurus and one of the largest settlements in Pisidia. It had a large territory, well provided with water and praised by Liv. 38,15 as being extremely fertile. By conquering S. in 333 BC, Alexander [4] the Great achieved the subjection of Pisidia (Arr. Anab. 1,28). There is still archaeological evidence of subse…

Sagaritis

(224 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Σαγαρῖτις; Sagarîtis). According to one of the many aetiological versions of the legend of Attis which purport to explain the self-mutilation of the priests of Cybele, Attis fell in love with the Hamadryad S. and broke the promise of chastity he had given Cybele. The nymph then died from the injuries done to her tree by Cybele, whilst Attis went mad and emasculated himself (Ov. Fast. 221-246; without mentioning the name of the nymph: Julian. Or. 8,165a-168c Rochefort; Sall. Philos…

Sagartii

(210 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] (Σαγάρτιοι/ Sagártioi; Old Persian asagarta 'Sagartia', asagartiya 'Sagartian', 'Sagartians'). In an inscription of Darius [1] I from Persepolis that lists the lands/peoples of the empire, the S. precede the Parthians, Drangianians, Arians and Bactrians [3. DPe 15-16]. In the inscription of Bīsutūn, the same ruler reports that two 'pretenders to the throne' - the Mede Fravartiš (Phraortes [3]) and the Sagartian Ciçantaḫma (who was later executed in Arbela) - had passed themselves off as …

Sagis

(75 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] River branch in the delta of the Padus (Po), splitting from the main stream west of Spina, where the Tab. Peut. 5,1 places the statio of Sacis ad Padum. In the Etruscan period, the city of Atria diverted the S. to fill the Venetian swamps (Septem Maria), thereby obtaining a navigable channel, which the Romans under Vespasian (AD 69-79) remodelled into the fossa [3] Flavia (Plin. HN 3,120). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)

Sagmen

(69 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt)
[German version] Sagmina (pl.) were the herbs which were pulled out of the ground with their soil in Rome on the Arx on behalf of the fetiales (Plin. HN 22,5; 25,105; Fest. 424-426 L.). These herbs were used during the appointment ritual of the pater patratus (Liv. 1,24,4-6); the fetiales also took them along on their missions (Liv. 30,43,9). Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) Bibliography J. Rüpke, Domi militiae, 1990, 100-103.

Sagra

(133 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce)
[German version] ( Sagra, -ae, fem.). Small river in Bruttium, south of Caulonia, modern Turbolo, where, c. 560 BC, the Locri [2] were victorious over a numerically far superior force from Croton, allegedly with the assistance of the Dioscuri (Str. 6,1,10; Cic. Nat. D. 2,6; 3,11; Plin. HN 3,95; Plut. Aemilius Paullus 25,1); hence the saying 'truer than the events at the S.' (Paroem. 1,36). Str. (loc. cit.) mentions the existence of altars of the Dioscuri on the S. Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) Bibliography R. van Compernolle, Ajax et les Dioscures au sécours des Locriens sur les rives de la S., in: J…

Sagrus

(90 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] River in Samnium, modern Sangro (Str. 5,4,2: Σάγρος/Ságros; Ptol. 3,1,19: Σάρος/Sáros). It passed through the territory of the Carricini past Aufidena and Trebula, then through the territory of the Frentani between Iuvanum and Pallanum, and flowed into the Ionios Kolpos between Ortona and Histonium. Below Castel di Sangro it could be crossed by a bridge that was part of the Roman road which went from Sulmo to Aesernia. Samnites, Samnium Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography L. Mariani, Aufidena, in: Monumenti antichi dei Lincei 10, 1901, 225-638, espe…

Sagum

(150 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] Male garment of a rectangular cloth (felt or loden) with a triangular or circular section cut out, sometimes also with hood. Worn as a shawl or cape and fixed at the right shoulder with a buckle or fibula (Pins), thus leaving the right side of the body uncovered. The sagum originally came from Gaul (Diod. Sic. 5,30,1: σάγος/ ságos; Varro, Ling. 5,167; Caes. B Gall. 5,42,3: sagulum) but was also worn by Germans and Iberians and in Italy and North Africa. It belonged to the garb of slaves and workers and to the battle dress of Roman navy and infan…

Saguntia

(31 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Town in western Hispania Baetica (Liv. 34,19,10; Plin. HN 3,15) on the Guadalete; modern Baños de Gigonza (Paterna de Rivera). Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography Tovar 1, 54 f.

Saguntum

(334 words)

Author(s): Ferrer Maestro, Juan José (Castellón)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Caesar | | Commerce | Hispania, Iberia | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | Pyrenean peninsula (Greek Σάγουντος/ Ságountos, Ζάκανθα/ Zákantha; residents Latin Saguntini, Saguntii; Greek Ζακανθαῖοι/ Zakanthaȋoi; Iberian name of the city apparently Arse, cf. the coins). City in the territory of the Edetani on the last foothill of the northeastern edge of the mountain range (170 m above normal zero), today 5 km from the eastern coast of Spain (the ancient sources provide divergent i…

Sahak

(308 words)

Author(s): Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
[German version] (Isaac). S. I (the Great), born between AD 340 and 350, died AD 438/9. Patriarch of Armenia, son of the patriarch Nerses the Great; last representative of the Gregorians (descendants of Gregory the Illuminator, Armenia [B]). S. grew up in Constantinople and studied there. Named patriarch of the Armenian Church in 387 in a time of internal conflict after Armenia was divided between Byzantium and Persia, his election was intended to reinforce Armenia's ties to Byzantium to counter t…

Sahara

(364 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] (from Arabic ṣaḥrā, 'desert'; cf. Hdt. 2,32: τὰ ἐρῆμα τῆς Λιβύης/ tà erêma tês Libýēs, 'the desert region of Libya'; Mela 1,50: deserta Africae). The indigenous people today call only individual parts of the S. by their own name. The largest desert on earth, situated in North Africa, with an expanse from the Atlantic in the west to the Red Sea in the east ( c. 6000 km; c. 8 million km2). The S. underwent several cyclical climatic changes (Climate) in prehistoric times that shaped the vegetation and the natural profile; the last of these changes in…

Sahr-e Kōmiš

(5 words)

see Comisene

Saii

(122 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Sauer, Vera (Stuttgart)
[German version] [1] Thracian tribe (Σάϊοι/ Sáïoi). Thracian tribe on the northern coast of the Aegeis across from Samothrace (cf. Archil. fr. 6 Diehl; Str. 10,2,17; 12,3,20). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography E. Oberhummer, s. v. Saii (1), RE 1 A, 1757  T. Spiridonov, Istoričeska geografija a n trakijskite plemena do 3. v.pr.n.e., 1983, 51, 101. [German version] [2] Celtic tribe Celtic tribe, later the name of its main city, present-day Sées, Dépt. Orne (Notitia Galliarum 2,6: civitas Saiorum; Commentarii notarum Tironianarum 87,63; cf. CIL XIII 630),…

Saint Petersburg, Hermitage

(2,015 words)

Author(s): Rudolph, Wolf (Berlin RWG)
Rudolph, Wolf (Berlin RWG) [German version] A. Institution (CT) Address: The State Hermitage Museum, Dvortsovaya Naberezhnaya, 32-38, St. Petersburg, Russia. http://www.hermitagemuseum.org/ Along with the Louvre (Paris, Louvre), the British Museum (London, British Museum) and like institutions, the Hermitage stands in the tradition of the great art museums and houses ca. three million objects in its various departments. Due to financial shortfalls and the economic situation in Russia, the museum has been seeking new…

Saints, Veneration of saints

(1,619 words)

Author(s): Fröhlich, Roland (Tübingen)
The veneration of saints began early in the development of Christianity. In the Catholic Church, 'saint' is a title conferred by the pope (since 1234), permitting liturgical veneration throughout the Church. Prerequisites for sainthood are an individual's 'saintly life' and at least two answers of a miraculous character to prayer (for the procedural order leading to canonization, see the Apostolic Constitution Divinus perfectionis magister: [1]). 'Beatification' precedes canonization. This permits public veneration ( cultus publicus) in a specific region or part of th…
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