Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Tarasius

(125 words)

Author(s): Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
[German version] (Ταράσιος; Tarásios). Patriarch of Constantinople ( c. AD 730-806), of noble descent, secretary to the empress Irene, who had him elected patriarch in 784 in connexion with her efforts to restore iconolatry. The Synod (Synodos II.D.) at Nicaea in 787, convened by him to solve the iconoclasm controversy (Syrian dynasty), was able at the second attempt to resolve to restore the worship of icons. It is to him that resolutions made at the synod are due; he had already written them in 754. Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) Bibliography Editions: PG 98, 1424-1428 (Apologeticus)  PG …

Taraxippus

(146 words)

Author(s): Scherf, Johannes (Tübingen)
[German version] (Ταράξιππος/ taráxippos, 'confuser of horses', from híppos and the aorist stem of taráttein). The monument in the form of a round altar, which was associated with T. (v.i.), stood on the (long) eastern side of the Hippodrome in Olympia, near the nýssa (turning post); the horses often shied there, which may have been due to preparing to round the turning post, but was explained by divine action. Paus. 6,20,15-18 offers several identifications for T. and his monument and himself considers an altar to Poseidon Hippios likel…

Tarbelli

(158 words)

Author(s): Demarolle, Jeanne-Marie (Nancy)
[German version] (Τάρβελλοι/ Tárbelloi). People in the west of Aquitania (Caes. B Gall. 3,20-27; Ptol. 2,7,9; with an unexplained epithet in Plin. HN 4,108: T. Quattuorsignani; cf. ILS 6962) living on both sides of the middle and lower Aturrus (modern Adour). Extracting gold brought them a certain wealth (Str. 4,2,1), as did hot and cold mineral springs (Plin. HN 31,4); their focus, however, remained on field and meadow husbandry. Subjugated in 56 BC by P. Licinius [I 16], the T. formed with other peoples the Civitas Aquensium in Gallia Aquitania with capital Aquae Tarbellicae (…

Tarbigilus (Tribigild)

(105 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Goth, related to Gainas, comes in the Eastern Empire. Probably an enemy of Eutropius [4]  (Claud. in Eutropium 2,176-180). In 399 AD he and his foederati troops rebelled (with Gainas's knowledge?) against Arcadius in Phrygia (Zos. 5,13,2-4), at first he was victorious over the imperial troops sent against him but afterwards he was defeated by them at Selge (Zos. 5,16,1-5); after uniting his troops with Gainas he marched on Constantinople (Zos. 5,18,4-9). He was killed during battles in Thrace (Philostorgios 11,8; [2. 151]). Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl) Bibliography 1 …

Tarchetius

(190 words)

Author(s): Aigner-Foresti, Luciana (Vienna)
(Ταρχέτιος/ Tarchétios). [German version] [1] Eponym of Tarquinii Eponym of the city of Tarquinii and name of Tarquinius, hailing from there. The root tarch- is well attested for people (Latin Tarquinius , Greek T.) and place names (Etruscan Tarchna ) and belongs to the original core of the Etruscan language; the etymology is unknown. Aigner-Foresti, Luciana (Vienna) [German version] [2] Name of a mythical king of Alba Longa Name of a legendary king of Alba Longa (Promathion in Plut. Romulus 2): he is toppled from his throne by his grandsons, twin brothers from …

Tarchna

(80 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] [1] Etruscan name for the city of Tarquinia Etruscan name for the city of Tarquinia (Tarquinii) from the 5th cent. BC (Early Etruscan: * tarchuna). Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) [German version] [2] Etruscan nomen gentile Etruscan nomen gentile, especially in the 'Tomb of Inscriptions' in Caere/Cerveteri. The names of more than seven generations are inscribed there, of which the two last are in the Latinized form Tarquitius. Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) Bibliography M. Cristofani, La Tomba delle Iscrizioni a Cerveteri, 1965.

Tarchon

(216 words)

Author(s): Aigner-Foresti, Luciana (Vienna)
[German version] also Tar χ unies (ET Vc 7.33; Cl 1.1060); Tar χ unus (ET AT p.11). Legendary son (Cato in Serv. Aen. 10,179) or brother (Serv. Aen. 10,198) of Tyrrhenus, or son of Telephus (Lycoph. 1246 f.). The form T. derives from the name of the city of Tarquinii (Etruscan Tarχna) [1. 285], the name may be connected with the Luwian daemon Tarχu(n) [3. 215 f.]. T. is supposed to have founded the twelve Etruscan cities (Str. 5,2,2), including Tarquinia, and to have transferred the twelve-city league model …

Tarcondarius

(75 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Ταρκονδάριος/ Tarkondários). T. Castor I, tetrarch of the Tectosages, with a Celtic name [1. 1732]. In the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC, T. and his father-in-law Deiotarus supported Pompeius [I 3], sending him 300 horsemen (Caes. B Civ. 3,4,5). After Caesar's death in 44 BC, he and his wife were killed in his residence of Gorbeus by Deiotarus (Str. 12,5,3). He was the father of T. Castor II (Deiotarus). Galatia Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Holder 2

Tarcondimotus

(191 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
(Ταρκονδίμοτος/ Tarkondímotos; also Ταρκόνδημος/ Tarkóndēmos). [German version] [1] T. I. Philantonius King of Amanus, son of Straton. Roman ally, partisan of Pompeius [I 3], Caesar, Cassius [I 10] and finally Antonius [I 9], on whose side he fell at Actium in 31 BC (Plut. Antonius 61,2; Cass. Dio. 41,63,1; 47,26,2; 50,14,2; Flor. Epit. 2,13,5; IGR 3, 901 = OGIS 752 and 753). In 51 BC Cicero appraises him as fidelissimus socius trans Taurum amicissimusque populi Romani ("the most faithful ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people", Cic. Fam. 15,…

Tarentini ludi

(6 words)

see Ludi, Tarentum

Tarentum

(145 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] [1] see Taras [2] See Taras [2]. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) [German version] [2] Sacred district in Rome Sacred district in Rome at the extreme northwest of the Campus Martius on the Tiber (Rome III. D.; Paul. Fest. 440 f.: Terentum). It was there that the Sabine Valesius from Eretum is supposed to have landed and established a cult on the spot where he had discovered an altar to Dis Pater and Proserpina at a depth of 20 feet. The cult was the preserve of the Valeria gens. For the games in T. see Ludi (III. K.). The nearby ford over the Tiber was…

Targetius

(4 words)

see Tasgetius

Targum

(402 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew targûm, 'translation'). Name of the Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible since the Tannaitic Period ( c. 2nd cent. AD). Of the Pentateuch, several Targum versions exist: a) Targum Onqelos, probably based on a Palestinian text ( c. late 1st/early 2nd cents. AD) and revised in Babylonia presumably between the 3rd and the 5th cents. AD, is largely a literal translation of the Hebrew text; b) Targum Neofiti, Targum Pseudo-Jonathan (= Targum Jerushalmi I) as well as the Fragment Targum (= Targum Jerushalmi II), …

Tarhuntassa

(247 words)

Author(s): Starke, Frank (Tübingen)
[German version] Inland country of the Hittite Empire (Ḫattusa II. with map) in southern Asia Minor, which first makes an appearance in history at the time of Muwattalli II ( c. 1290-1272 BC) during the temporary relocation of the Hittite capital to this region's capital of the same name (T.; at modern Karaman or in the upper  Calycadnus valley). After Mursili III Urḫitesub ( c. 1272-1265) was deposed, Ḫattusili II (previously “III”; c.  1265-1240) established in T., as compensation for his brother Kurunta Ulmitesub who had been excluded from the legitimate successi…

Tarius

(163 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] L. T. Rufus. Possibly from Liburnia ([1. 105-135], but cf. [2. 563]), of lowly origins (Plin. HN 18,37). He was involved in leading sea operations at Actium (Cass. Dio 50,14,1), probably already a senator at the time. He acquired a large estate in Picenum (Plin. HN loc.cit.), possibly proconsul of Cyprus: IGR 3, 952. He took part, in c. 16 BC, in campaigns in Macedonia (Cass. Dio 54,20,3), possibly as ( legatus) pro pr( aetore) (AE 1936, 18), but possibly only as promagistrate pro pr( aetore). In 16 BC cos. suff. According to Frontin. Aq. 102,3 f., in AD 23 a…

Tarnis

(84 words)

Author(s): Polfer, Michel (Ettelbrück)
[German version] Tributary of the Garumna, modern Tarn (Auson. Epist. 22,27-32; 26,31; Auson. Mos. 465;  Sid. Apoll. Epist. 5,13,1;  Sid. Apoll. Carm. 24,45), rising on Cebenna Mons, border river between Narbonensis and Aquitania. According to Plin.  HN 4,109 (correction of [1. 148]) border river between the Tolosani (Tolosa) and the Petrocorii. Polfer, Michel (Ettelbrück) Bibliography 1 E. Desjardins, Géographie historique et administrative de la Gaule romaine, vol. 1, 1876. H. Zeiß, s. v. T., RE 4 A, 2328  M. Provost, Carte Archéologique de la Gaule 81, Le Tarn, 1992, 44.

Tarodunum

(145 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Oppidum (Ταρόδουνον; Taródounon). Celtic township at the end of the Höllental valley (Ptol. 2,11,30), modern Zarten in the Black Forest. There is evidence of a fortified site (approximately 200 ha) with murus Gallicus (scarcely traces of settlement), with a 2nd/1st century BC settlement area outside it (approximately 12-16 ha) (Celtic coins, products of gold smelting, a planchet, amphora sherds, a glass bracelet, ring beads). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography F. Fischer, Beiträge zur Kenntnis von T., i…

Tarpeia

(181 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Sylvia
[German version] (Ταρπεία/ Tarpeía). According to Antigonus [7] (FGrH 816 F 2), daughter of the Roman general T. Tatius, otherwise (esp. Liv. 1,11,5-9; Ov. Met. 14,776; Ov. Fast. 1,261 f.; Val. Max. 9,6,1; Plut. Antiquitates Romanae 17f; Cass. Dio fr. 4,12) daughter of Sp. Tarpeius [3]. T. betrays the Romans in their war with the Sabines (Sabini) by opening a gate of the city to the enemy soldiers and demands what the warriors are wearing on their arms (their gold bracelets) in return. The Sabines …

Tarpeium saxum

(44 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Steep crag at the southeast of the Capitol (Capitolium) in Rome; named after Tarpeia. Place of execution, where delinquents accused of various crimes were thrown from the rock to their deaths. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Richardson, 377 f. s. v. Tarpeia Rupes.

Tarpeius

(223 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Sylvia | Müller, Christian (Bochum)
[German version] [1] T. mons According to Varro (Ling. 5,41), term for the Capitolium, cf. Tarpeium Saxum. Zimmermann, Sylvia [German version] [2] Epithet of Iuppiter as lord of the Capitolium Epithet of Iuppiter as lord of the Capitolium, where the rock was from which traitors were thrown to their deaths in accordance with a law written by T. [4] (e.g. Ov. Fast. 6,34; Ov. Met. 15,866; Prop. 4,1,7). Zimmermann, Sylvia [German version] [3] T., Sp. Father of Tarpeia Father of Tarpeia, commander of the Capitoline fortress under Romulus [1] during the attack of the Sabine kin…
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