Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Tashkent

(152 words)

Author(s): Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin)
[German version] The capital of modern Uzbekistan, on the western slopes of Mount Tianshan, in an oasis irrigated by the Čirčik (a tributary of the Iaxartes). The country of Juni mentioned in 2nd cent. BC Chinese sources was later identified with the area of T. The local name was presumably Čač, as also used in the Islamic period; Arabic authors used Šaš. The earliest traces of settlement date from the 6th-4th cents. BC (Šaš-Tepe). From the 5th cent. AD several towns developed, which ultimately me…

Tas Silġ

(128 words)

Author(s): Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg)
[German version] Large rural sanctuary to Juno/Astarte on the Gulf of Marsaxlokk in the southeast of Malta (Melite [7]), originally dedicated to the mother goddess of the indigenous megalith culture of the Copper Age (3rd millennium BC), from no later than the 8th/7th cent. the site of a Phoenician cult of

Taste

(1,690 words)

Author(s): Frackowiak, Ute (Hamburg RWG)
[English version] Basic aesthetic and moral questions are centered in the concept of taste as the expression of the ability to make aesthetic judgment. To be sure, in urbanitas, understood as the cultured person's way of living and his attitude to life, Antiquity already knew two designations for taste: sensus (Cic. Orat. 162), the innate organ of perception, common to all human beings and receptive to beauty, and iudicium (Cic. Orat. 36), the culturally determined ability to judge based on education and sharpened intellect, individual and subjectively distinct.…

Tatianus

(689 words)

Author(s): Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Gutsfeld, Andreas (Münster) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
I. Greek [German version] [I 1] Christian apologist and theologian, 2nd cent. (Τατιανός; Tatianós). Christian apologist and theologian (born c. AD 120). By his own account, T. was from the East Syrian/North Mesopotamian region (Or. 42). His work betrays a knowledge of classical authors relying upon Hellenistic scholarly tradition. His travels brought T. into contact with a variety of the philosophical and religious systems of his period ( i.a. participation in mystery cults, which he fails to define more precisely). In Rome, study of the Bible finally brought hi…

Tatius, T.

(240 words)

Author(s): Stenger, Jan (Kiel)
[German version] Legendary king of the Sabines (Sabini) in the city of Cures. T. waged war with the Romans because of the rape of the Sabine women (Varro Ling. 5,46; Liv. 1,10,1 f.). Through the treachery of Tarpeia, who was either bribed by T. or in love with him, he succeeded in occupying the Roman Capitol (Capitolium; Liv. 1,11,6; Prop. 4,4; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 2,38-40; Plut. Romulus 17,2-4). The war with Rome was settled when Romulus [1] and T. concluded a treaty ( foedus; Cic. Rep. 2,13; Verg. Aen. 8,635-641; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 2,46,1 f.). The two ruled the city toge…

Tatta

(85 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Τάττα λίμνη; Tátta límnē). Largest lake in Asia Minor (Str. 12,5,4; Plin. HN 31,84), modern Tuz Gölü ('Salt Lake'), an undrained basin in the highlands of central Anatolia (Galatia), about 900 m above sea level, mean depth 1 m, According to the season the surface area is between about 1100 km2 (summer, salinity up to 32%) and 2500 km2 (after winter rains). Salt extracted from Lake T. was considered to have healing powers (Dioscorides, De materia medica 5,109,1). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography Belke, 230 f.

Tattius

(48 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] C. T. Maximus. Eques. Tribune of the equites singulares in Rome, attested 142-145 AD. Recorded from 156 until 158 as praefectus [16] vigilum; in 158 he became praefectus praetorio succeeding Gavius [II 6] Maximus until his death in 160. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography R. Sablayrolles, Libertinus miles, 1996, 487 f.

Tauchira

(158 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | Colonization | Crete | Limes (Ταύχειρα; Taúcheira). City in Cyrenaea, modern Tokra in Libya (Hdt. 4,171); founded by Cyrene (schol. Pind. Pyth. 4,26). T. was conquered in 322 BC by Ptolemaeus [1] and renamed by Ptolemaeus [3] to Arsinoe after his step-mother, by M. Antonius [I 9] to Cleopatris. Towards the end of the 4th cent. AD, T. was under pressure from Berber tribes; later it was again fortified under Iustinianus [1] I (Procop. Aed.…

Taulantii

(297 words)

Author(s): Cabanes, Pierre (Clermont-Ferrand)
[German version] (Ταυλάντιοι/ Taulántioi). Illyrian people, known already by Hecataeus (FGrH 1 F 99; 101; cf. Ael. NA 14,1; Str. 7,7,8; App. Ill. 16; App. B Civ. 2,39; Ptol. 3,13,3; 3,13,20; Liv. 45,26,13; Plin. HN 3,144; Mela 2,3). Galaurus, a king of the T. and an enemy of the Macedonians (Polyaenus Strat. 4,1), has been dated to as early as the end of the 7th cent. BC. At the founding of Epidamnos (Dyrrhachium) in 626/5 BC, the T. came to the aid of the colonists of Corcyra against Liburnian pir…

Taunus

(302 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] One of the highest mountain ranges in Germania (Mela 3,30; name possibly Celtic). In AD 15 Germanicus [2] had a fort built in monte Tauno on the ruins of a fortress designed by Claudius [II 24] Drusus (Tac. Ann. 1,56,1). This fortress has often been identified with a fort established by Drusus 'among the Chatti immediately on the Rhine' in 11 BC (Cass. Dio 54,33,4). Since the latter is now presumed rather to be in the area of the Neuwieder Basin, the identification of Drusus' two fortresses is as uncertain as the connection with Ἄρταυνον/ Ártaunon in Ptol. 2,11,29. The T…

Taurasia

(143 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) | Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] [1] City of the Hirpini City of the Hirpini in the mountains of Samnium, destroyed by the Romans in 298 BC. It was to the territory of T. that in 180 BC Ligurian Apuani were deported (Liv. 40,38,3; 41,4; Plin. HN 3, 105; Baebius [I 12]). Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography D. Marcotte, Lucaniae, in: Latomus 44, 1985, 721-742  J. Patterson, Sanniti, 1988, 168-170  G. De Benedittis, Fagifulae, 1997, 17-22, 65-74. [German version] [2] Capital of the Taurini This item can be found on the following maps: Punic Wars Probably the capital of the Taurini (App. Hann. 5…

Taureas

(106 words)

Author(s): Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough)
[German version] (Ταυρέας; Tauréas). As a son of a cousin of Leogoras [1] (whose son, the orator Andocides [1], boasted he was from the “oldest of all the noble houses”, And. 1,47), he belonged to the Athenian nobility. Between 430 and 415 BC he was trounced by Alcibiades [3] in a dispute over a choregia; denounced in the scandal of the Mutilation of the Herms (Herms, Mutilation of the) in 415, he was released when Andocides confessed. At about this time T. already had an adult son. Plato [1] knows of a palaestra belonging to T. (Plat. Charm. 153a). Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough) Bibliography Davie…

Tauri

(255 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ταῦροι/ Taûroi). Pre-Scythian people on the Chersonesus [2] (Crimea), probably descendants of the bearers of the Kizil-Koba culture, in the 7th/6th cent. BC driven by the Scythae and Greek colonists into the inland hills. They occupied themselves especially with agriculture and animal husbandry; there is evidence of trade with Greek poleis only from the 4th cent. BC onwards. A goddess worshipped among the T. was identified by the Greeks with Artemis or Iphigenia (Hdt. 4,103). In 513 BC the T. declined to help the Scythae against…

Taurianum

(135 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce)
[German version] City in Bruttium (Cato HRR, fr. 71; Mela 2,4,68; Tab. Peut. 7,2: Tauriana; Plin. HN 3,73: Tauroentum) to the south of the Mataurus river on the border with Rhegium at modern Monte Traviano [1. 117-130]. It is unclear whether it is the inhabitants of T. [1. 126; 2] that are meant by the Tauriani who capitulated to the Romans in 213/2 BC (Liv. 25,1,2). Scanty archaeological remains [1. 118 f., 130-133]; inscriptions from the Bruttian (brick stamps) and Roman periods [1. 133-144; 3; 4. 255]. Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) Bibliography 1 S. Settis, Tauriana, in: RAL ser. 8a, vo…

Taurike Chersonesos

(24 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] (Ταυρικὴ Χερσόνησος; Taurikḕ Chersónēsos) see Chersonesus [2]. von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) Bibliography J. M. Mogaričev (Hrsg.), Problemy istorii i arheologii Krymy, 1994.

Taurini

(112 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] Ligurian (Plin. HN 3,123;  Str. 4,6,6) or Celtic people between the Doria Riparia (Alpes Cottiae) and the upper Padus (modern Po). They were involved in Rome's wars against the Celts at the end of the 4th cent. BC (Pol. 2,28,4) and opposed in vain Hannibal's [4] march into Italy in 218 BC, resulting in the destruction of their capital Taurasia [2] (App. Hann. 5;  cf. Pol. 3,60,9; Liv. 21,39,4) Refounded after 25 BC [1. 143] as Colonia Augusta [5] Taurinorum. Sartori, Antonio (Milan) Bibliography 1 G. Cresci Marrone, La fondazione della colonia, in: E. Sergi (ed.), Stor…

Taurinus

(5 words)

see Pelops [2]

Taurion

(103 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Ταυρείων; Taureíōn). Macedonian, phílos (Court titles B.) of Antigonus [3] and Philippus [7] V, when as their governor in the Peloponnese T. was acting on behalf of the Achaei (Pol. 4,6,4; 10,2; 10,6; 19,7 f.; 80,3; 5,92,7; 95,3; 95,5). In 219/8 BC T. was affected by the Apelles [1] affair (Pol. 4,87,1 f.; 4,87,8 f.; 5,27,4) and in 217 was probably one of the peace negotiators at Naupactus [1. 112]; T.'s negative influence on Philippus (Pol. 9,23,9) and his complicity in the death of Aratus [2] (Plut. Aratus 52,2-3) are questionable. Günther, Linda-Marie (Munic…

Tauris

(56 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] Island between Pharus [2] and Corcyra [2] Melaina off the Dalmatian coast (Tab. Peut. 6,4), modern Šćedro (in Croatia). Caesar's legate P. Vatinius [I 2] was victorious at T. over the fleet of Pompey's party in 47 BC (Bell. Alex. 45,1,2). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography M. Kozlic̆ić, Historical Geography of the Eastern Adriatic, 1990, 300.

Taurisci

(287 words)

Author(s): Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] (Ταυρίσκοι/ Taurískoi). Celts in the area of the Alpes and the Ister [1] (Danube), first mentioned at the southern edge of the western Alpes, where they appeared in 225 BC as part of the Celtic war alliance against Rome (Pol. 2,15,8; 28,4; 30,6); the Taurini were also counted among them (Pol. 3,60,8). Cato Orig. 2,6 includes the Lepontii and the Salassi among the T. In the late 1st cent. BC, Timagenes [1] (FGrH 88 F 2) mentions that the tribal hero, a Gaulish tyrant, was annihilate…
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