Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Tagos

(144 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne)
[German version] (ταγός; tagós). Tagos (etymologically from táxis, cf. German Herzog) is usually seen as an elected (originally for life, later in the event of war: IG IX 2,257) highest official of the Thessalian League [1. 237-249; 2]. The effect of the dominance of the noble 'clans' (Aleuadae; Echecratidae; Scopadae) in the 5th cent. BC was that the office of tageía lost its significance [3. 125-127]; under Iason [2] the office temporarily gained a new prestige [5]. Recent studies, in contrast, see tagos as a genuinely local official (the official term for a high office instead being a…

Tagus

(88 words)

Author(s): Stepper, Ruth
[German version] (Τάγος/ Tágos). A gold-bearing (Mela 3,8) river, at 1008 km the longest (Str. 3,2,3; 3,1; 3; Plin. HN 3,19; 25; Ptol. 2,5,4) in the Iberian peninsula, modern Tagus (Spanish Tajo, Portugese Tejo). It rises in the modern Universales mountains, flows through Toletum, Caesarobriga, Augustobriga and into the Oceanus at Olisippo; first mentioned during the campaign Hannibal [4] conducted against the Carpetani in 218 BC (Pol. 3,14,5; Liv. 21,5,8). Stepper, Ruth Bibliography Schulten, Landeskunde 1, 341-349 P. Barceló, Aníbal de Cartago, 2000, 81 TIR K 30 Madrid, 199…

Taharka, Taharko

(5 words)

see Taracus

Taht-i Suleyman

(5 words)

see Šīs

Taifali

(199 words)

Author(s): Waldherr, Gerhard H. (Regensburg)
[German version] (Ταΐφαλοι/ Taḯphaloi, Suda s. v. Τ.; also Taifruli). Semi-nomadic Eastern Germanic equestrian people, recorded in the mid-3rd cent. AD in Dacia (Daci) and Moesia (Moesi; Iord. Get. 91) and then with the Tervingi in the north of Transylvania (Eutr. 8,2,2). In the middle of the 4th cent., they probably settled to the east of Muntenia (in modern Romania) as far west as the Alutus (modern Olt) with their core in the Muntenian Baragan Steppe. Earliest mention in literature: Pan. Lat. 11…

Tainia

(303 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Greek ταινία/ tainía). Term for bindings of all kinds. [German version] [1] Headband for festivals (Head)band, worn at Greek festivals (Pl. Symp. 212d.e, 213d; Xen. Symp. 5,9). Even gods wore, or bound their heads with, tainiai. (Paus. 1,8,4). Furthermore, cult images (Paus. 8,31,8; 10,35,10), trees (Theocr. 18,44), monuments [3], urns, sacrificial animals and deceased (Lucian, Dial. mort. 13,4) had tainiai wound round them. The Romans adopted tainiai from the Greeks (e.g. Ov. Met. 8,724 f.). As a sign of a victor and of success (Paus. 4,16,6; 6,20,10; 9,22,3…

Taktika

(326 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Military handbook Byzantine term for military handbook, cf. Taktika [2]; cf. also stratēgikón . Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) [German version] [2] Taktika of Leo Military handbook ( stratēgikón) in 20 books, written c. AD 905 by the emperor Leo [9] VI or at his command. It is to some extent based on earlier sources such as writings by Onasander [2] and the stratēgikón of Mauricius, but it also contains many contemporary passages, e.g. on the Arabs and Hungary. The work, which is preserved in two different versions, exer…

Taktikon Beneševič

(6 words)

see Taktika [3]

Taktikon Uspenskij

(6 words)

see Taktika [3]

Talarius ludus

(331 words)

Author(s): Harmon, Roger (Basle)
[German version] (from Latin talus, 'ankle', 'dice'). The four secure written records about the TL allow no final conclusion as to whether it was a Roman game of dice (thus [7. 1842]) or a type of staged presentation in which the performers wore a toga that reached down to their ankles. For Cicero (Cic. Att. 1,16,3; Cic. Off. 1,150), the TL was immoral and the lowest profession next to 'salve vendors' and 'dancers' (Entertainers); Quintilianus (Inst. 11,3,58) emphasises its frolicsomeness and implies song as an accompaniment…

Talassio

(7 words)

see Wedding customs and rituals

Talaus

(97 words)

Author(s): Börm, Henning (Kiel)
[German version] (Τάλαος; Tálaos). Mythical king of Argos, son of Bias [1] and Pero [1], brother of Perialces and Arius, husband of Lysimache. T., who was probably originally a mountain daimon, in the earlier legend is made to lose his life and rule by Amphiaraus (Pind. N. 9,13) and appears in later literature as one of the Argonauts (Apoll. Rhod. 1,118) and as the father (Hyg. Fab. 70) of Adrastus, Aristomachus, Hippomedon, Mecisteus, Parthenopaeus, Pronax and Eriphyle (Seven against Thebes). His grave was worshipped in the market place of Argos (Paus. 2,21,2). Börm, Henning (Kiel)

Taleides Painter

(215 words)

Author(s): Mommsen, Heide (Stuttgart)
[German version] Attic Black Figure vase painter, c. 550-530 BC, named after the potter Taleides, most, perhaps all, of whose signed pots (15) he decorated: various shapes, mainly Little-Master cups. In addition he painted two hydriai for the potter Timagoras. The TP also had connexions with Amasis (Amasis Painter); the authenticity of an Amasis signature on the foot of a TP lekythos in Malibu (GM 76.AE.48), however, is disputed. The more than 30 pots ascribed to the TP show that among his contemporari…

Talent

(445 words)

Author(s): Hitzl, Konrad (Tübingen)
[German version] (τάλαντον/ tálanton; Latin talentum). The talent was the biggest Greek unit of measurement for the monetary system and for commercial weights. Thus, the word tálanton was used in the Greek Bible translation as a synonym for the highest weight level of the Hebrew text (Hebrew kikkar, cf. 2 Sam 12,30; 1 Kings 9,14; 9,28 et alibi; cf. Mt 25,14-30), without any connection to its actual weight. A talent was always worth 60 minai ( mína [1]) regardless of their weight. The silver coin-talents from Aegina, Euboea, Attica and probably Corinth, too, consistently…

Talion

(631 words)

Author(s): Hengstl, Joachim (Marburg/Lahn) | Völkl, Artur (Innsbruck)
(Latin talio, 'equal retribution') means that the penalty must be appropriate to the evil committed against the victim. [German version] I. General points Talion is found in many ancient laws, e.g. Cod. Hammurapi 229 (killing the son of the builder because of the builder's responsibility for the death of the landlord's son) or Ex 21:22-25 ("An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, blood for blood"). From a historical perspective, talion can be regarded as a mitigation compared to the unrestricted right of revenge of th…

Talmud

(142 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] ('study, learning', from Hebrew lamad, 'learn'). The central work within rabbinical literature, consisting of a) the Mishnah, the oldest authoritative collections of laws of rabbinical Judaism ( c. AD 200) and b) the Gemara, i.e. interpretations of and discussions on the material of the Mishnah. Since in the rabbinical period there were two centres of Jewish scholarship, i.e. Palestine and Babylonia (Sura, Pumbedita), two different Talmudim came into being: the Palestinian (= Jerusalem Talmud; essentially finalized c. AD 450) and the Babylonian (essentiall…

Talmudic law, Talmud schools

(8 words)

see Judaic law

Talos

(308 words)

Author(s): Dräger, Paul (Trier)
(Τάλως/ Tálōs). [German version] [1] Crete's iron guardian Myth of various versions in Apollod. 1,140 f.: T. was one of the bronze race or was given to Minos by Hephaestus (by Zeus to Europe [2]: Apoll. Rhod. 4,1643); he is a bronze man (triple giant: Orph. A. 1351) or a bull; he has a single vein from the neck to the ankles which is sealed at the end by a bronze nail (a membrane: Apoll. Rhod. 4,1647 f.); he runs all the way around Crete three times a day and keeps the Argonauts from landing by throwing…

Talos Painter

(186 words)

Author(s): Böhr, Elke (Wiesbaden)
[German version] Attic vase painter of the late Classical period, c. 410-390 BC, successor of the Meidias Painter and the Dinos Painter, named after a volute krater in Ruvo with a rare depiction of the death of the mythical bronze giant Talos [1]. The TM is known exclusively by large pots: kraters, a loutrophoros and a stand for a lebes. Typical of the TM is his unusual way of depicting mythological themes: wedding of Theseus and Helena, feast of Dionysus and Hephaestus in a vine arbour, apotheosis of Hera…

Talpa

(4 words)

see Mole
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