Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Vandals

(758 words)

Author(s): Waldherr, Gerhard H. (Regensburg)
[German version] East Germanic tribe or ethnic group. Information about their early history and origin (possibly from southwestern Sweden and northern Denmark [1]) is hypothetical. Late references to wars with the Goti and Langobardi (Iord. Get. 26 f.; Paulus Diaconus, Historia Langobardorum 1,7 ff.) are also problematic. According to Plin. HN 4,99 f., V. designates a group of tribes (possibly identical with the Vandilii: Tac. Germ. 2,4). They probably belonged to the cult-based grouping of tribes called the Lugii [1] and were related to the…

Vangio

(46 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Suebian. With Sido, he deposed his uncle, Vannius , in AD 51, divided the kingdom of the Suebi with Sido and thereafter reigned in close dependency on the Roman Empire, but apparently detested by his subjects (Tac. Ann. 12,30). Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)

Vangiones

(191 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] A presumably Germanic, later Celticised people, whose original homeland on the right bank of the Rhenus [2] (modern Rhine) is unknown. They marched across the Rhine with Ariovistus, who was defeated by Caesar in 58 BC (Caes. B Gall. 1,51,2). The V. were initially for the most part driven back over the Rhine. In the time of Augustus, but no later than before the middle of the 1st cent. AD (Tac. Ann. 12,27,2), they were settled on the left bank of the Rhine to the north of the Triboci and the Nemetes, and to the south of Mogontiacum; the capital of their civitas was Borbetomagus…

Vani

(184 words)

Author(s): Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jena)
[German version] City in West-Georgia, c. 25 km southwest of Kutaisi, a centre of ancient Colchis. In 1896, a structure with three terraces which had been destroyed in the mid 1st cent. BC began to be excavated (with interruptions). Three phases could be distinguished (I: 8th-6th cents.; II: 5th-4th cents.; III: 3rd-1st cents. BC). Several buildings were uncovered (a surrounding wall with gate in phase III) as well as tombs (gold jewellery with granulation); the finds include a large number of Greek …

Vannius

(117 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Of the Quadi. Installed as king of the territory between the rivers Marus and Cusus (March and Waag?) by Drusus [II 1] in AD 19, following the elimination of Maroboduus and Catualda (Tac. Ann. 2,63). He developed his rule praedationibus et vectigalibus ('by robbery and tolls') ( ibid. 12,29). Finally, in AD 51, V. was unable to prevail against internal conflicts (revolt of Vangio and Sido) and external pressure from the Hermunduri and Lugii. Emperor Claudius [III 1] did not intervene in these conflicts, but permitted V. to take refuge in exile in Pannonia ( ibid. 12,30). Lü…

Vanth

(175 words)

Author(s): Amann, Petra
[German version] Female Etruscan Underworld daemon. As an announcer of death and guardian of graves V. appears, usually winged, primarily in the funerary domain (Burial, Dead, cult of the), sometimes together with Charun (Charon), sometimes in mythical scenes. An earlier type of representation with a long chiton can be traced until the 5th cent. BC; in the Hellenistic period her appearance was strongly influenced by the Greek Gorgo [1] (snakes as hair) and the Erinyes (boots, short chiton, cross s…

Vapincum

(209 words)

Author(s): Winkle, Christian
[German version] City in Gallia Narbonensis, chief town of the Avantici [1. 75, 287, 290] in the territory of the Vocontii tribal federation, modern Gap (in the département of Hautes-Alpes). A significant station ( mansio; beaker from Vicarello 66 Miller: Vappincum) on a linking road between the valley of the Rhodanus (Rhône) and Italy. The earliest traces of settlement (dolmen) are from the Chalcolithic period [2. 1, 20]. Two pre-Roman oppida lie on the hill of Saint-Mens to the east [2. 17] and that of Puy-Maure to the west [2. 14] of the modern town which cov…

Varangians

(82 words)

Author(s): Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
[German version] (Βάραγγοι/ Bárangoi). Scandinavians who from about the early 10th cent. AD arrived in Byzantium by way of the territory of the Kievan Rus (hence also often described as Ῥώς/ Rṓs or Tauroscythae), from the 11th cent. also Anglo-Saxons who served in the Byzantine army (in which they were considered particularly trustworthy), but primarily in the Imperial Guard. Their characteristic weapon was the battle-axe, which earned them the nickname 'axe-bearers' (πελεκυφόροι/ pelekyphóroi). Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich) Bibliography S. Franklin, A. Cutler, s. v. Varangia…

Varazdat

(99 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] After the murder of Pap in AD 374 his nephew (or cousin?) V. was installed by the Roman government as king in Armenia. He had the imperial general Mušel Mamikonian, the son of Vasaces [1], murdered and c. 378 was banished by Vasaces's brother Manuel (Faustus [4] of Byzantium 5,34 f.; 5,37; legendary Moses [2] of Chorene 3,40). PLRE 1, 945. Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) Bibliography M.-L. Chaumont, s. v. Armenia and Iran II, EncIr 2, 418-438, esp. 428 R. H. Hewsen, The Successors of Tiridates the Great, in: Rev. des études arméniennes 13, 1978/79, 99-126 J. Markwart, Sü…

Varazes

(93 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] (Βαράθης/ Baráthēs, Varazes). An Armenian who was sent by Iustinianus [1] to Italy in 548 at the head of 800 of his countrymen and arrived at just the right time to rescue Verus (PLRG 3B, 1370) and his Heruli from total destruction by Totila (Procop. Goth. 3,27). Recalled from Italy in 551, he was appointed leader of 800 Tzans (Armenian sub-tribe) against the Persians in Lazica (Procop. Goth. 4,13,10). His identification with an Armenian commander V. in Lazica in 556 (Agathias 4,13) is disputed. PLRE 3B, 1362 f. Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)

Varciani

(99 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] (Οὐαρικιανοί/ Ou arikianoí). A possibly Celtic people in Pannonia (Plin. HN 3,148; Ptol. 2,15,2), whose settlement area can probably be found in the southeast of Pannonia Superior to the east of the Sisciani (Siscia). V. were recruited into the Roman army probably as early as during the Great Pannonian Rebellion (AD 6-9) (cf. CIL XIII 7707; 7804; 8188; CIL V 875; CIL VI 3257) and deployed primarily in the Cohors Varcianorum Equitata. Burian, Jan (Prague) Bibliography B. Saria, s. v. V., in: RE 8 A, 363-365 A. Graf, Übersicht der antiken Geographie von Pannonien…

Vardagate

(75 words)

Author(s): Salomone Gaggero, Eleonora (Genoa)
[German version] City on the southern bank of the upper Padus (modern Po), possibly modern Casale Monferrato. A municipium , tribus Pollia, Regio IX (Plin. HN. 3,49). Cf. an unknown emperor's rescript to Clodius Secundus from the 1st-2nd cent. AD [1. 240-242, no. 1]. Salomone Gaggero, Eleonora (Genoa) Bibliography 1 G. Mennella, E. Zanda (eds.), Supplementa Italica 13, 1996, 231-249. E. Gabba, Aspetti sociali del rescritto imperiale di Vardagate, in: M. Cébeillac-Gervasoni (ed.), Les élites municipales de l'Italie péninsulaire, 2000, 457-461.

Vardanes

(411 words)

Author(s): Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jena) | Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] [1] River to the east of the Sea of Azov In Ptol. 5,8,2 and 14 (Οὐαρδάνης/ Ouardánēs) the most southerly of the seven rivers beyond the Tanais (Don) flowing from the east into the Maeotis (Sea of Azov), on which five cities are mentioned; the V., which is also known to Amm. 22,8,26, was a large navigable river which can be identified with the Kuban. In Antiquity it also had the name Hypanis [2], in the Roman period, however, it had the Sarmatic name V. Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jena) Bibliography E. Polaschek, s. v. V. (1), RE 8 A, 367 f.  V. Gajdukevič, Das Bosporanische R…

Vardo

(159 words)

Author(s): Winkle, Christian
[German version] River in Gallia Narbonensis (rich in fish according to Sid. Apoll. Epist. 2,9,9), modern Gard or Gardon. Fed by the source streams Gardon d'Anduze and Gardon d'Alès on Cebenna mons (Cévennes), it flows into the Rhodanus (modern Rhone) to the north of Tarusco [1]. The river is crossed at Remoulin by a three-tier aqueduct (modern Pont du Gard), part of a conduit built c. AD  50 (50.1 km in length; descent 12·27 m) which led the spring water of the Eure by way of Ucetia to Nemausus (Nimes) [1]. The Pont du Gard has a length of 142·35 m on the lowe…

Vareia

(108 words)

Author(s): Ferrer Maestro, Juan José (Castellón)
[German version] (Οὐαρία/ Ou aría). City of the Berones on a bridge over the Iberus [1] (modern Ebro), which was navigable downstream from there on (Plin. HN 3,21; cf. Str. 3,4,12; Ptol. 2,6,55), mansio on the Tarraco-Asturica road (It. Ant. 393), modern Varea in the west of Logroño (Rioja). The original Iberian settlement was on modern Monte Cantabria and was relocated to the plain in the 1st cent. BC. Archaeological remains: various house foundations, floor mosaics. Ferrer Maestro, Juan José (Castellón) Bibliography W. Espinosa, V. en el universo romano, in: J. Sesma (ed.), Histo…

Varenus

(185 words)

Author(s): Bartels, Jens (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman gens of Etruscan origin (Schulze, 248). [German version] [1] V., L. was accused c. 80 BC of murder and defended by Cicero, who claimed that the deed had been in the interest of the accuser Ancharius [2] Rufus and that hence he was the murderer, but lost the case (Prisc. Institutiones grammaticae 7,70; 12,29; Quint. Inst. 5,13,28; 7,1,9; 7,2,36; 9,2,56). Bartels, Jens (Bonn) [German version] [2] V. Rufus A senator; he represented the province of Bithynia et Pontus in the Senate against the proconsul Iulius [II 28] Bassus, who had been accused of extortion (…

Vargunteius

(163 words)

Author(s): Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) | Bartels, Jens (Bonn)
Roman nomen gentile, recorded from the 2nd cent. BC onwards (AE 1997,283; Schulze, 160). [German version] [1] Recitator, 2nd cent. BC Roman recitator of the 2nd cent. BC, who recited the Annales of Ennius [1] to large crowds on particular days (Suet. Gramm. 2) and who was understood in later times as a grammarian. Obtaining a textual edition from the Anecdoton Parisinum (GL 7,534) by conjecture on the name is problematic. Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) Bibliography HLL 1, § 38. [German version] [2] Legate, fell in 53 BC Died in the Parthian War in 53 BC, when, as a legate of M. Licinius …

Varia

(47 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] V. is supposed to have been the name of the grandmother of  Elagabalus [2]  (SHA Opil. 9, 1-3; SHA Heliog. 10,1; 12,3; 31,4). This may have been a fiction based on the name of Elagabalus' father (see Varius [II 6] Marcellus). Eck, Werner (Cologne)

Varius

(1,160 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Bartels, Jens (Bonn) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman family name, probably derived from Varus. Name-bearers first attested in the 1st cent. BC, but only in the Imperial period did they attain any prominence. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] V. Cotyla, L. Aedile in 48, 47 or 44 BC (Cic. Phil. 13,26), emissary at Rome for M. Antonius [I 9] in 43, and his legate in Gallia transalpina (Cic. Phil. 5,5-7; 8,24-32; Plut. Antonius 18,8). Bartels, Jens (Bonn) [German version] [I 2] V. Rufus, L. Roman poet, c. 70-15 BC Renowned Roman poet (Hor. Ars P. 55) of the Augustan period (c. 70-15 BC). Wi…

Varro

(7,114 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Sallmann, Klaus (Mainz) | Schmidt, Peter Lebrecht
[German version] [1] Mentioned in Josephus, Bl. Mentioned in Jos. BI 1,398 as ἡγεμών ( hēgemṓn) of Syria, c. 25-23 BC. Identification uncertain. Most recently [1. 17 f.]. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 E. Da̧browa, The Governors of Roman Syria, 1998. [German version] [2] V. Terentius, M. (Reatinus) Roman polymath author, 116-27 BC The most important Roman polymath author. M. Terentius Varro: Works     No. (in text)     Title (Latin)     English title or subject    State of preservation1     Edition; Testimonia; Catalogus Hieronymi2 (=  C)     1 (II 5)     Aetia     Ori…
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