Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Campana Reliefs

(5 words)

see  Relief

Campania

(951 words)

Author(s): Pappalardo, Umberto (Naples)
[German version] A. Region The name of the region (Scyl. 10; Varro, Rust. 1,10,1; 1,20,4; 2,6,5) probably derived from  Capua, its most significant town; C. was bounded by mons Massicus and Sinuessa in the north, mons Lactarius and Surrentum in the south, and the hill country at the foot of the Samnite mountains in the east. In the Augustan age, C. also encompassed the ager Picentinus as part of the regio I (Str. 5,4,13; Plin. HN 3,60ff.; Schol. Juv. 3,219, Latium et Campania; 226; Serv. Aen. 8,9,564). C. comprised of the following districts from north to south: the ager Falernus between Sin…

Campania

(2,703 words)

Author(s): Stärk, Ekkehard (Leipzig)
Stärk, Ekkehard (Leipzig) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) The land between the Volturno in the north and the Sorrento peninsula in the south gained in the Roman period a great significance over and above its geographical and political importance. Factors favouring this were: the continuation of Greek culture in the coastal settlement centres (Naples as Graeca urbs; Tac. ann. 15, 33, 2; cf. Strabo 5,4,7), the arrival after the 2nd cent. BC of Roman citizens as visitors either for health reasons (thermal springs) or in search of the good life (ma…

Campanian Standard

(7 words)

see  Coinage, standards of

Campanian vases

(696 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] The Campanian vases (CV) of the 5th-4th cents. BC were made of a light brown clay and the surface often painted with a red-coloured coating. Artists generally preferred smaller vessels, besides these as the main shape, strap-handled amphora, also hydriae and bell craters; only seldom do pelike types appear ( Pottery, shapes and types of, vessel shapes with fig.). Characteristics attributed to  Apulian vase painting such as volute and column craters, loutrophoroi, rhyta or nestorid…

Campe

(94 words)

Author(s): Visser, Edzard (Basle)
[German version] (Κάμπη; Kámpē). Gigantic jaileress who stands guard in  Tartarus over the  Cyclopes and the Hecatoncheires, monsters with one hundred hands. In the Titanomachy, Zeus follows the advice of Gaia and kills C. (according to Diod. Sic. 3.72.3 she is killed by Dionysus near the Libyan city of Zabrina) so that the former prisoners can support Zeus (Apollod. 1.6); a detailed description of C. as a sort of dragon (starting with the appellative meaning ‘caterpillar’) can be found in Nonnus, Dion. 18.236-264. Visser, Edzard (Basle) Bibliography W. Kroll, s.v. K., RE 10, 1842.

Campestris

(97 words)

Author(s): Sallmann, Klaus (Mainz)
[German version] (-ter, -trius, -τριος). Roman astrologer, possibly of the 3rd cent. AD (differently in [1]), who, according to Lyd. De ostentis p. 24,5 Wachsmuth, revived the prophetic  astrology and magic of  Petosiris, perhaps as an alternative to the Middle Platonic  demonology. He wrote De cometis (Lyd. Ost. p. 35,8, chs. 11-16; Adnotationes super Lucan. 1,529), and about powers of the underworld such as  Typhon (Serv. Aen. 10,272), the title Catabolica infernalia (according to Fulg. Exp. Verg. p. 86 Helmet) is doubtful.  Astrology Sallmann, Klaus (Mainz) Bibliography 1 E. Ri…

Campi Catalauni

(138 words)

Author(s): Schön, Franz (Regensburg)
[German version] Settlement area of the  Catalauni in modern Champagne, repeatedly the scene of significant battles, thus in AD 273 the victory of emperor Aurelianus over the Gallic usurper  Esuvius Tatricus (SHA Aurelian. 23,3; Eutr. 9,13; Jer. Chron. AD 273), and in AD 366 the victory of general Iovinus over a Germanic army (Amm. Marc. 27,2,4). The Campi Catalauni attained particular fame with the battle of Châlon of 451, when, under Avitus' leadership, a coalition between Rome and the Visigoths…

Campi Phlegraei

(114 words)

Author(s): Gargini, Michela (Pisa)
[German version] (Greek, Φλέγρα, Φλεγραῖον πεδίον, Φλεγραῖα πεδία; Phlégra, Phlegraîon pedíon, Phlegraîa pedía). Name of a coastal strip north of  Campania (between Capua, Nola and Vesuvius: FGrH 566 Timaeus fr. 89; Pol. 2,17,1; from Cuma to Pozzuoli: Str. 5,4,4; Plin. HN 3,61; 18,111); the name was coined by the Chalcidians, who founded  Cumae; Phlegra ( Pallene,  Chalcidice), the volcanic home of the giants, is supposed to be the root of the place name, possibly because of this region's similar volcanic nature. Gargini, Michela (Pisa) Bibliography BTCGI 4, s.v. Campi Flegrei…

Campus Agrippae

(89 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Part of the   campus Martius in Rome; according to the Constantinian regionaries, it was located in regio VII to the right of the via Flaminia and north of the aqua Virgo; originally belonging to Agrippa, it was given to the Roman people by Augustus in 7 BC (Cass. Dio 55,8). According to one of the fragments of the acta fratrum Arvalium from AD 38, it was also the location of the Tiberian ara Providentiae. Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) Bibliography F. Coarelli, in: LTUR 1, 217 Richardson, 64.

Campus Martius

(555 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] (Field of Mars). Tract of land in Rome, shaped like an irregular quadrangle, between the Palazzo Venezia, S. Carlo al Corso, the Ponte Vittorio Emanuele, and the Piazza Cairoli. According to legend, with the foundation of the Republic, the campus Martius (CM) passed from Tarquinian (Dion. Hal. 5,13,2) to public ownership (Liv. 2,5,2; Plut. Poblicola 8,1). The level terrain, not fragmented by private property, was predestined for monumental architecture for public or representative purposes, as in Strabo's (5,3,8). desc…

Campylus

(35 words)

Author(s): Strauch, Daniel (Berlin)
[German version] (Καμπύλος; Kampýlos). One of the tributaries of the Achelous in Aetolia (Diod. Sic. 19,67,3); its location cannot be determined more closely. Strauch, Daniel (Berlin) Bibliography H. v. Geisau, s.v. K., RE 10, 1844.

Camulianae

(75 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] (Καμουλιαναί; Kamoulianaí, Kamuliana). Settlement on the road from Caesarea/Mazaka to Tavium in Cappadocia, possibly the modern Kermer. Its name is not of Celtic origin (different view in [1. 197f.]); as a place of pilgrimage (image of Christ, translation to Constantinople in AD 574), it became a town under the name of Iustinianopolis; documented as a diocese from AD 553 into the 13th cent. Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) Bibliography 1 Hild/Restle. W. Ruge, s.v. K., RE 10, 1844.

Camulodunum

(222 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Caesar | Christianity | | Coloniae | Limes | Pertinax | Britannia | Britannia The largest iron age oppidum in Britannia was situated on the lower reaches of the river Colne in Essex; under the rule of kings Dubnovellaunus and  Cunobellinus [1]. C., modern Colchester, developed. In its heyday (from about AD 10 to 40), the oppidum comprised 30 km2 within a system of protective dykes. As an important centre of power, C. attracted the import of luxury goods from Gaul and Italy. A richly decorated r…

Camulogenus

(69 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Compound Celtic name, ‘descendant of the (god) Camulus’ [1.60-61; 2.160]. An Aulercan, who in 52 BC lead the  Parisii and their neighbouring tribes against T.  Labienus, but fell in a battle at the Seine (Caes. B Gall. 7,57-62). A gold coin of the  Arverni was possibly dedicated to him [3.419, fig. 454; 4.726-727]. Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Evans 2 Schmidt. 3 A. Blanchet, Traité monn. gaul., 1905 4 Holder, 1.

Camulos

(85 words)

Author(s): Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn)
[German version] Celtic god, by interpretatio Romana assigned to Mars. Among only six extant dedications, the inscription found in Rindern/ Germany provides evidence for a temple of C. The inscription in Rome (CIL VI 46) -- often claimed to refer to C.- makes no mention of this god [1. 87ff.]. Euskirchen, Marion (Bonn) Bibliography 1 J. Terrisse, in: Bull. Soc. Arch. Champenoise 1991, no. 2. Ch. B. Rüger, in: BJ 172, 1972, 643ff. F. Lefèvre, in: Bull. Soc. Arch. Champenoise 1983, no. 4, 51ff. G. Bauchhenß, s.v. Mars Camulus, LIMC 2.1, 568.

Camunni

(144 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] Inhabitants of the upper Oglio valley (Val Camonica), described by some sources as Raeti (Str. 4,6,7) or rather Euganei (Plin. HN 3,134) in the central Alps. A continuity in culture of more than 1000 years is evident in numerous rock paintings, ranging from phases I-III (Neolithic to Bronze Age) to phase IV (from the 8th cent.) and IV 4 (3rd to 1st cents. BC), socio-sacral expressions by hunter and warrior tribes [1. 131ff.]. Listed among the gentes Alpinae devictae, who were defeated by Augustus in 16 BC (CIL V 7817), they were possibly put under the admin…

Cana

(94 words)

Author(s): Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
[German version] (Κάνη, Κάναι; Kánē, Kánai). Frequently mentioned foothills (ἀκρωτήριον, Hdt. 7,42,3; Diod. Sic. 4,53,2; 13,97,4,1; Str. 10,1,5; 13,1,68; Καινὴ ἄκρα, Ptol. 5,2,6,1) with a settlement and a harbour in north-western Aeolis, at the southern end of the bay of Adramytteum, near the modern Kara Dağ. A decree from Demetrias [1] bestows honours on three citizens of C. (IG IX 2, 1105 I). Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) Bibliography L. Bürchner, s.v. K., RE 20, 1844f. W. Leaf, Strabo on the Troad, 1923, 335-337 Robert, Villes, 18 J. Stauber, Die Bucht von Adramytteion 1 (IK…

Canaan

(4 words)

see  Palaestina

Canaanite

(95 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Traditional general term for a dialect group of north-west Semitic, spoken and written in Syria, Palestine and in the Mediterranean ( c. 10th cent. BC to today; with proto-Canaanite precursors). Canaanite includes  Phoenician, the closely related  Ammonite,  Punic as a late further development of Phoenician,  Edomite as a link between Phoenician and  Hebrew (the Canaanite dialect passed down best and longest) and  Moabite, which is close to Hebrew. The existence of additional local dialects is still a matter of contention. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bi…
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