Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Carmen famosum

(180 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The carmen famosum (CF) (according to Paulus, Sent. 5,4,6) or malum carmen (defamatory poem) is a criminal offence like the   occentatio placed beside each other in the Tabulae duodecim (8,1). It is possible that this crime was only barely comprehensible even for ancient writers (e.g. Cic. Rep. 4,12), particularly because of the extremely severe penalty for mere defamation: probably  death penalty. It was a matter of private punishment, though, so it was barely more than a legally p…

Carmen figuratum

(7 words)

see Figured poem

Carmen Saliare

(161 words)

Author(s): Kunz, Heike (Tübingen)
[German version]  Hymn of the  Salii. This cultic song in 35 fragments of unknown sequence, partly in saturnians, is only preserved by antiquarians ( Antiquarian;  C. Arvale,  C. Saeculare); a commentary on it was written by  Aelius Stilo in the 1st cent. BC. It was regarded as belonging to the oldest Roman poetry (Varro, Ling. 7,3). Its age is uncertain, addenda probably date from as late as the 2nd cent. AD (SHA Aur. 21). It begins with a general invocatio, the   axamenta (Paul. Fest. 3,12-15 L). Of the extant invocations of the gods, only Jupiter can be identified with ce…

Carmentis

(253 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] (In Greek always, in Latin very rarely Carmenta). Roman goddess of birth and ‘everything future’ (Fast. Praenestini on 11 January). Even if in historical times, she was overshadowed by related female deities (especially  Iuno Lucina), her old importance is evident in the existence of a Flamen Carmentalis. Her sanctuary lay between the Capitol and the Tiber at the Porta Carmentalis [1] and was regarded as being founded by the matrons at the resumption of births after a birth-strike…

Carmina Einsidlensia

(6 words)

see  Einsiedel Eclogues

Carmina figurata

(5 words)

see  Technopaignia

Carmina Priapea

(5 words)

see  Priapea

Carmina triumphalia

(181 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] Song of the soldiers, whose parade concluded a triumphal procession. There is evidence to show that in the carmina triumphalia, the triumphant general received both praise (Liv. 4,20,2) and mockery. The reported antiphony may particularly refer to the latter (Liv. 4,53,11). Obscene ridicule and satire in this context were generally compared with the satirical poetry at weddings (Fescennine verses); they were seen as apotropaic, or rather seen as a further admonishment along with the hominem te esse memento of the bearer of the corona triumphalis. The evidence is …

Carminius

(326 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Schmidt, Peter L. (Constance)
[German version] [1] (M. Ulpius) C. Athenagoras Official, 2nd cent. AD Proconsul of Lycia-Pamphylia, cos. suff. possibly under Commodus [1. 151]. The family came from Attuda (for his relatives: EOS 2, 633). Eck, Werner (Cologne) [German version] [1a] C. C. Gallus Suffect consul AD 120 Suffect consul AD 120 [1]. Probably to be identified with the proconsular legate of the same name. PIR2 A 1065. Eck, Werner (Cologne) Bibliography 1 W. Eck, P. Weiß, Hadrianische Suffektconsuln: Neue Zeugnisse aus Militärdiplomen, in: Chiron 32, 2002 (in print). [German version] [2] L.C. Lusitan…

Carmo

(107 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Hispania, Iberia | Phoenicians, Poeni | Pyrenean peninsula Settlement of the  Turdetani, modern Carmona (province of Sevilla in Spain). C. rose to importance during the conflicts between Rome and Carthage (3rd/2nd cents. BC; App. Ib. 25; Liv. 33,21,6ff.). Caes. B Civ. 2,19,4 and Str. 3,2,2 refer to C. as one of the most important towns of Baetica. The names of some of the officials of this   municipium civium Romanorum or Latinorum are known from coins [1. 199] and from inscriptions (CIL II 1378ff.; 5120). Barceló, Pedro (Pots…

Carna

(209 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] Roman goddess whose temple was vowed and founded on the Caelius mons by the first  Brutus immediately after the expulsion of the  Tarquinii; (Macrob. Sat. 1,12,31). Its foundation day is 1 June, the festival of the Carnaria (CIL III 3893). C. received offerings of bacon and bean gruel (Macrob. Sat. 1,12,32; cf. Ov. Fast. 6,169-182: Kalendae fabariae), which suggest a simple, old-fashioned way of life (Ovid) or which are meant to depict C. as a protector of physical strength (Macr.). The authors state that her role is the protection of …

Carnation

(212 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] As we do not know of any ancient name, we cannot clarify whether the carnation was found in ancient times. Possibly it is meant by the name Διὸς ἄνθος/ Diòs ánthos, ‘flower of Zeus’ Latin Iovis flos, from which the modern name of the genus, Dianthus, is also derived. At any rate, of the 65 representatives that grow in Greece from among the 120 wild European species of carnation, 20 are regarded as endemic [1. 81]. In the shrub-like Cretan carnation, Dianthus arboreus, archaeologists see the model for wall paintings in the palace of Knossos. As Zeus is said to …

Carnea, Carneus, Carnus

(1,177 words)

Author(s): Baudy, Gerhard (Constance)
[German version] (Κάρνεια, Κάρνειος, Κάρνος; Kárneia, Kárneios, Kárnos). The C. was a standard Dorian midsummer festival dedicated to Apollo Carneus (to the ‘ram’-Apollo, cf. Hsch. s.v. κάρνος ... πρόβατον) with musical agons (Hellanicus of Lesbos, FGrH 4 F 85). It was allegedly institutionalized in 676/3 BC (Sosibius, FGrH 595 F 3). Part of the festival was the sacrifice of a ram: in Theocritus (5,82f.) a shepherd raises a choice ram just for the C. The epithet Carneus did not belong solely to  Apollo…

Carneades

(628 words)

Author(s): Stanzel, Karl-Heinz (Tübingen)
(Καρνεάδης; Karneádēs). [German version] [1] Academic philosopher from the 3rd/2nd cent. BC Academic philosopher, born 214/3 (or 219/8 BC) in Cyrene, died 129/8 in Athens. He probably came to Athens as a young man, later receiving rights of citizenship. After studying i. a. under the Stoic  Diogenes [15] of Babylon he joined the  Academy, taking over leadership from another of his masters,  Hegesinus [1], in around 164/60. He gave up the leadership in 137/6, thus long before his death, perhaps for health re…

Carneiscus

(86 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Καρνεΐσκος; Karneískos). Pupil of  Epicurus, originating in Asia Minor, perhaps from Cos or Rhodes. In his work Φιλίστας ( Philístas), comprising at least two volumes, he wrote on the Epicurean concept of friendship. The end of the 2nd volume (extant in PHercul. 1027) is dedicated to one Zopyrus, otherwise unknown. C. expresses his disagreement with the Peripatetic philosopher  Praxiphanes, criticizing his writing on friendship for suggesting improper forms of relationship between friends.  Epicurean School Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography T. Dorandi,…

Carni

(210 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] Celtic tribe (cf. triumph of M. Aemilius Scaurus de Galleis Karneis: CIL I 12,49), who may have arrived at the Adriatic coast towards the end of the 3rd cent. BC. C. are first mentioned in 181 BC as inhabiting the region later known as  Aquileia: Liv. 39,22,6f.; 40,34,2; 45,6; 54,2ff. According to Str. 4,6,9, they occupied the hinterland of Aquileia, together with some Norici ( Noricum) and the  Veneti (5,1,9); their relationship with these is not quite clear as, according to Str. 7,5,3, th…

Carnifex

(103 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] The hangman, who in Roman society as in virtually every place and time fulfilled a despised function, to be performed beyond the pale of civic life. Execution of  capital punishment by the carnifices was supervised under the Roman Republic by the   tresviri capitales . Whether they were state slaves, as was generally supposed in the past, is entirely uncertain. In Cumae and Puteoli it was the independent undertakers, during the imperial age soldiers too, who fulfilled the duties of the carnifex. Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen) Bibliography W. Kunkel, Staatsordnung …

Carnion

(62 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Meyer, Doris (Strasbourg)
[German version] (Καρνίων; Karníōn). Tributary of the Gatheatas, modern Xerilas; the Gatheatas rises on the north-western slopes of the Taygetus and discharges into the Alpheius [1] south of Megale Polis (Paus. 8,34,5; Callim. H. 1,24). Plin. HN 4,20 mentions, possibly erroneously, an otherwise unknown Arcadian town of the same name. Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Meyer, Doris (Strasbourg) Bibliography Philippson/Kirsten, vol. 3, 288f.

Carnuntum

(681 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Commerce | Legio | Legio | Limes | Pannonia Important Roman base and settlement on the Danube at the intersection of the amber trade route (running from Aquileia through the March valley to the Baltic Sea) and the road along the Danube valley, modern Petronell and Bad Deutsch-Altenburg. Its Celtic name which can be linked with the neighbouring tribe of the Carni (e.g. Old Iranian carn‘stone mount’) indicates a (as yet unverified) pre-Roman settlement. The locus Norici regni C., from where Tiberius set out agains…

Carnus

(66 words)

Author(s): Strauch, Daniel (Berlin)
(Κάρνος; Kárnos). [German version] [1] Epithet of Apollo and Zeus see  Carnea Strauch, Daniel (Berlin) [German version] [2] Island on the Acarnanian west coast Island on the Acarnanian west coast of Alyzeia, identified as the modern Calamus. Documentation: Scyl. 34; Plin. HN 4,53; Artem. in Steph. Byz. s.v. C. Strauch, Daniel (Berlin) Bibliography W. M. Murray, The Coastal Sites of Western Akarnania, 1982 Philippson/Kirsten 2, 390-392.
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