Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Carsium

(100 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Roman fort on the embankment road of the Danube, built under Trajan, modern Hîrşova/Constanţa in Romania (Tab. Peut. 7,3 Carsio; It. Ant. 224; Not. Dign. or. 39,22 Carso; Geogr. Rav. 4,7,2 Carsion; Ptol. 3,10,5 Κάρσους; Procop. Aed. 4,11,20 Καρσώ). Road junction, ford across the Danube. Destroyed by the Huns, rebuilt, into the 6th cent. garrison for military units, amongst them the legio I Italica, ala II Hispanorum et Aravacorum, milites Scythici. Burian, Jan (Prague) Bibliography R. Vulpe, Histoire ancienne de la Do…

Carsulae

(167 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Umbri, Umbria Town of the imperial age (Tac. Hist. 3,60; Plin. Ep. 1,4), on the via Flaminia between Narnia and Mevania in Umbria, on an elevated plain, a little to the north of San Gemini. Municipium of the tribus Clustumina. Excavations: via Flaminia within the town area, forum (lining the via Flaminia in the east with two small tetragonal arches, trapeziform, its southern end delimited by a temple with two cellae), theatre, amphitheatre (86 × 62 m), cisterns. To the east of the road, the church of S. D…

Carteia

(127 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Located close to the mouth of the Guadarranque near Algeciras in Spain (near Cieza, province of Murcia), C. played an important role because of its Phoenician acculturation. During the Second Punic War, the Romans defeated the fleet of the Carthaginian  Adherbal [3] near C. in 206 BC. From the base of C., the Roman general  Laelius began the negotiations which were to lead to the surrender of  Gades (Liv. 28,30,3). In 171 BC, C. became a colonia Latina libertorum, the first outside Italy. The town remained loyal to Rome throughout, e.g. in the war against V…

Cartennae

(103 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Commerce | Punic Wars | Punic Wars (Καρτέννα[ι], Κάρτιν[ν]α; Karténna[i], Kártin[n]a). Probably a Punic town in the later Mauretania Caesariensis, modern Ténès (sources: Mela 1,31; Plin. HN 5,20; Ptol. 4,2,4; It. Ant. 14,2; Aug. Epist. 93,20-22; Iulius Honorius, Cosmographia 47; Geogr. Rav. 40,46; 88,9). In around 30 BC, C. admitted a colonia of veterans. C. was important as a harbour town, not least as a landing place for the vexillationes, deployed in the battles against the Mauri. Inscriptions: CIL V…

Carthage

(5,523 words)

Author(s): Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg) | Kopka, Alexandra (Freiburg i. Br. RWG)
Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg) [German version] I. Archaeological Excavations (CT) Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg) [German version] A. From the beginnings to the settling of the White Fathers in 1875 (CT) Legends about the untold riches of the Punic metropolis have always fascinated treasure hunters, starting with Scipio's soldiers, who ransacked and razed the city in 146 BC, and with Pompey's legionnaires, who, two generations later, after the victory against the Numidian king Hiarbas near Utica (83 BC), scoured the nearby d…

Carthage

(1,885 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg) | Leisten, Thomas (Princeton) | Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg)
This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Caesar | Christianity | Africa | Wine | | Coloniae | Africa | Etrusci, Etruria | Commerce | Colonization | Limes | Limes | Pertinax | Phoenicians, Poeni | Pilgrimage | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | Rome | Rome (Phoenician Qrt-ḥdšt, ‘new town’; Greek Καρχηδών/ Karchēdṓn, Lat. Carthago). I. History [German version] A. From Phoenician foundation to Roman colony According to Timaeus' report (FGrH 566 F 60), C. was founded in 814/13 or 813/2 BC -- on the site of Tunis' modern suburb of the same name. The colonist were …

Carthago Nova

(350 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Caesar | | Coloniae | Commerce | Hispania, Iberia | Phoenicians, Poeni | Punic Wars | Punic Wars | Pyrenean peninsula | Rome | Rome Carthago Nova (CN) was founded by  Hasdrubal in c. 225 BC as his new centre of power in the location of Mastia (with the best harbour of the entire Spanish Mediterranean coast; modern Cartagena). The Carthaginian town was adorned with many representative buildings: a temple to the Punic deities  Baal and  Eshmun, palaces, docks, as well as a massi…

Carthalo

(395 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
(Punic *Qrthls = ‘(Ml)qrt has saved’; Greek Καρθάλων; Karthálōn). [German version] [1] Son of Malchus (6th cent. BC), Carthaginian priest of Melqart Son of  Malchus (2nd half of the 6th cent. BC?). As the Carthaginian priest of  Melqart he was entrusted with presenting the tithe of the booty to the god in  Tyrus but on his return refused to support his father's rebellion and was executed by him (Just. Epit. 18,7,7-15) [1. 23f.]. Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) [German version] [2] Carthaginian nauarch in 1st Punic War in 256/5-248/7 BC In the First Punic War the Carthaginian nauarc…

Cartima

(82 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] Modern Cártama, province of Málaga. Iberian, according to [1. 1126] Celtiberian town; mainly epigraphically verified (CIL II 1949-1962; identical with Certima in Liv. 40,47,2?). In AD 53/54, it became a civitas libera (CIL II 1953: decemviri), under Vespasian a municipium civium Latinorum (CIL II 1956 and Suppl. 5488). According to inscriptions and extant remains (CIL II p. 248; Suppl. p. 876), C. also seems to have enjoyed prosperity later on. Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) Bibliography 1 Holder 3. Tovar 1, 132.

Cartimandua

(139 words)

Author(s): Kunst, Christiane (Potsdam)
[German version] British client queen of the  Brigantes, a confederation of tribes in the north of the province. In AD 51, she demonstrated her loyalty to Rome by handing over  Caratacus (Tac. Ann. 12,36; Hist. 3,45). Because of their dependance on a stable northern border, several provincial governors intervened in C.'s favour in internal Brigantian conflicts: in 48 P. Ostorius Scapula (Tac. Ann. 12,32,2), and A. Didius Gallus between 52-57 [1. 48f., 231] (Ann. 12,40) by dispatching auxiliary coh…

Cartography

(3,225 words)

Author(s): Talbert, Richard (Chapel Hill, NC) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
I. Cartography [German version] A. Definition In the following, ‘maps’ are defined as graphic representations with the purpose of easing the understanding of spatial-geographical concepts. The extent to which Greeks and Roman produced and used maps has been the subject of controversy in recent times, not least, because it touches on the wider question of how far we can safely assume that our own cultural attitudes and expectations were shared by classical antiquity. Talbert, Richard (Chapel Hill, NC) [German version] B. The concept of maps It is obvious that antiquity had no con…

Cartography

(1,860 words)

Author(s): Talbert, Richard (Chapel Hill, NC)
[English version] Maps - in the broader sense of graphical representations facilitating spatial understanding - were made by the Greeks and the Romans in many forms since early times. The assumption - still detectable in novels and films - that maps played in those cultures a role comparable to their function in our contemporary world is widespread. However, recent research is skeptical about this. It assumes that the maps used by the Greeks and the Romans were only rarely relevant for the organiz…

Cartonnage

(132 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] Cardboard or papier mâché made from used pieces of papyrus for making mummy bandages (for humans or animals). Common in Egypt during the Ptolemaic period (find spots: necropoleis of Ghoran, Madīnet al-Nuḥās, Al-Ḥība); a number of examples can be dated to the end of the Augustan period (find spots: Abū Ṣīr al-Malaq). Numerous 3rd-cent. BC fragments of Greek literary texts (e.g. Callimachus, Menander, Plato; list in [1]) and copies of documents (petitions or submissions/ enteúxeis to the Ptolemaic court) have been recovered from dismantled cartonnage. Dorandi, Tizia…

Carura

(190 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
(τὰ Κάρουρα; tà Károura). [German version] [1] City in SW Asia Minor Town in south-western Asia Minor on the upper course of the  Maeander at the border between Caria and Phrygia (Str. 12,8,17; 14,2,29), near the modern Sarayköy. Thanks to its hot springs, C. was an ancient health resort; a medical school (in the tradition of  Herophilus [1]) was based near the sanctuary of Men Karu (Str. 12,8,20), halfway between C. and Laodicea [4] (2nd/1st cents. BC). Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg) Bibliography Miller, 726 W. M. Ramsay, The Historical Geography of Asia Minor, 1890, 49 Ramsay 1, 164; 16…

Carus [1]

(428 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) | Courtney, Edward (Charlottesville, VA) | Rottler, Christoph (Tübingen) | Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf)
(Κάρος, Κάκυρος; Káros, Kákyros). Celtiberian from Segeda, general of several Iberian tribes and towns that defeated the army of the consul Q.  Fulvius [I 17] Nobilior on 23/ 8/153 BC. The Roman prohibition of building a wall around Segeda caused the confrontation. C. was killed while pursuing the enemy (App. Ib. 45; Diod. Sic. 31,39; Flor. Epit. 1,34 [Megaravicus]).  Hispania Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) [German version] [2] Poet friend of Ovid A poet friend of  Ovid (Pont. 4,13 is addressed to him; 3,5 in the Tristiae, where the identity of the respective addressees is con…

Carus(s)a

(34 words)

Author(s): Marek, Christian (Zürich)
[German version] (Κάρουσσα; Károussa). Settlement on the Paphlagonian Black Sea coast east of  Sinope (Peripl. m. eux. 24; Scyl. 89; Plin. HN 6,7). Marek, Christian (Zürich) Bibliography W. Ruge, s.v. K., RE 10, 2244.

Carventum

(57 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence)
[German version] Town in Latium near Praeneste; member of the Latin League (Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 5,61). The arx Carventana is mentioned in connection with the disputes between Rome and the  Aequi until 409 BC (Liv. 4,53,55). No traces from a later period; its identification with Roccamassima is unfounded. Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) Bibliography BTCGI 5, 20-28.

Carvilius

(362 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
Name of a plebeian (probably immigrant) family, attested in the 3rd-2nd cents. BC, but later disappeared (ThlL, Onom. 219f.; Schulze, 139, A.8; 403; 454). The quaestor and witness in the trial of Camillus in 391 BC, Sp. C. (MRR 1,93), may have been a later fabrication; there was also a chieftain of Britain by the name of C. (Caes. B Gall. 5,22,1). [German version] [1] C., L. Tribunus plebis 212 BC People's tribune in 212 BC, alongside Sp. C., perhaps his brother. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] C., Sp. Leader of a scribal school Freedman of Sp. C. Maximus Ruga, around 2…

Carya

(71 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
[German version] (Καρύα; Karúa). Daughter of the Laconian King Dion, beloved of Dionysus. Her sisters, Orphe and Lyko, who lock up C., are struck with insanity by Dionysus and transformed into the cliffs of Taygetus; however C. is transformed into a walnut tree (Serv. Ecl. 8,29). According to epic poet Pherenicus, C. is, like other Hamadryads, a daughter of Oxylus and his sister Hamadryas (Ath. 3,78b). Walde, Christine (Basle)

Caryae

(213 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum)
(Καρύαι; Karýai). [German version] [1] Arcadian settlement Arcadian settlement (χωρίον) on the southern shore of the lake of Pheneus (Paus. 8,13,6; 14,1). Lafond, Yves (Bochum) [German version] [2] Settlement in NW-Parnon This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta Settlement in the north-western Parnon range, on Sparta's north-eastern border with Arcadia, either near the modern Analipsis on the banks of the Saranda-Potamos in the north-east of the plain of Kambos, or near Arachova north of the village that once again bears th…
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