Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Dia

(455 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Bloch, René (Berne) | Kalcyk, Hansjörg (Petershausen) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
(Δῖα, Δία; Dîa, Día). [German version] [1] Female equivalent of Zeus The female equivalent of  Zeus, as Diwiya on the Linear B inscriptions from Pylos and Knossos, with her own sanctuary, just as  Poseidon also has his female counterpart in the Mycenaean pantheon [1]. In the post-Mycenaean period the three heroines who can be linked with the Mycenaean goddess by name, are all linked with Zeus, but the individual derivation is problematical. Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) [German version] [2] Heroine in the local cults of Phlius and Sicyon The heroine is most likely D. in the local cult…

Diabateria

(4 words)

see  Sacrifices

Diacira

(102 words)

Author(s): Oelsner, Joachim (Leipzig)
[German version] Mesopotamian town on the right bank of the Euphrates, not far from modern Hı̄t, exact location unknown. Amm. Marc. 24,2,3 and Zos. 3,15,2 (here variation Δάκιρα, Dákira) report on the destruction of the town situated in Sassanid territory and the rich booty in the battles of the Romans on the eastern border of the empire against the Sassanid empire under Julian (AD 363). According to Zosimus, the surrounding area had asphalt resources. The form of the name is Aramaic (analyzed as di/d and qı̄rā ‘[place] of asphalt’, aqı̄rā would be expected). Oelsner, Joachim (Leipzig) Bi…

Diacria

(100 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Διακρία; Diakría), also Hyperacria and Epacria. Term for the mountainous northeast of Attica [2], probably also the Attic east coast as far as Brauron, the ancestral home of the  Peisistratids (Pl. Hipparch. 228b; Plut. Solon 10,3; [4. 224]). Supported by a group of Hyperakrioi (Hdt. 1,59) or Diakrioi (Aristot. Ath. Pol. 13,4; [1; 2; 3. 184-188]), Peisistratus [4] established his tyrannis in Athens in 561 BC. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 K. H. Kinzl, Regionalism in Classical Athens?, in: Ancient History Bull. 3, 1989, 5-9 2 R. J. Hopper, 'Plain', 'S…

Diacritical signs

(1,054 words)

Author(s): Schade, Gerson (Berlin) | Kruschwitz, Peter (Berlin)
[German version] I. Greek Texts by Greek authors were already supplied in antiquity with a whole range of symbols; aids to reading ( Punctuation) such as punctuation marks and accenting, as well as critical and, finally, colometrical signs ( Colometry) can be differentiated. Although  Aristophanes [4] of Byzantium ( c. 265 ─ c. 190 BC) is regarded as the inventor of punctuation [8. 222], he was by no means the first person to use it. Punctuation to separate metric units is already encountered in the dikolon on the cup from Ischia called, because of the inscription, the Nestor…

Diadema

(359 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
[German version] (διάδημα; diádēma). The term was originally used to describe all bands worn round the head; different from  wreath. The diadema decorates, consecrates and raises its wearer above others; in this way diademata are symbols of dignity, particularly in cult; to this belong the ‘bust crowns’ or the ‘griffin diadema’ of the priests and deities; of a religious nature are also the ribbon-, gable- and rhomboid-shaped ‘ diademata of the dead’ that from the Mycenaean period onwards (shaft tomb IV, Mycenae) in many cases adorn the forehead of the deceased a…

Diadematus

(18 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Cognomen of L. Caecilius [I 26] Metellus D. ( cos. 117 BC). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)

Diadikasia

(279 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (διαδικασία; diadikasía). In Athens a judicial procedure aimed at organizing the legal situation without plaintiffs and defendants. It was not introduced as part of the usual civil action (δίκη, díkē) and took place in two main groups of cases, namely in disputes in which two or more opponents asserted a better claim to a private or public right, or in those cases in which it was a matter of exemption from a duty under public law. In the first group the most common case involved a claim by several persons to a legacy in an inheritance dispute [1. 159ff.]. The object of the cla…

Diadochi and Epigoni

(1,093 words)

Author(s): Rosen, Klaus (Bonn)
[German version] Diádochoi, ‘successors’, is a literary collective term for the generals of Alexander who after his death in 323 BC made themselves heirs to his empire both co-operating and opposing each other. Their successors, the second generation after Alexander, were then grouped together as epígonoi, ‘those born later’. The memory of the Epigoni of the legend, the sons of the Seven against Thebes, probably played a larger part in naming them than Alexander's Epigoni, the group of 30,000 young Oriental troops who were meant to supplement the Macedonian phalanx (Arr. Anab. 7,6,1). J…

Diadochi, wars of the

(935 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] The term refers to the wars between the former companions and generals of king Alexander [4] ( Diadochi and Epigoni) for his inheritance, lasting from his death in 323 BC to the formation of the Hellenistic state system. The period of the D. can be roughly divided into two periods: the wars leading up to the death of  Antigonos [1] Monophthalmos (301 BC), who championed most forcefully the unity of the empire, and the subsequent phase, beginning as early as c. 305, in which the Hellenistic successor states of Alexander's empire slowly took on the characteris…

Diadoumenos

(4 words)

see  Polyclitus

Diaeta

(341 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne)
[German version] Room in a Roman  villa; however, it is not possible within the framework of Roman villa architecture to define a diaeta typologically or historically either on the basis of the villa letters of Pliny the Younger (Plin. Ep. 2,17; 5,6) or on other traditions. In both Laurentinum and Tusci, Pliny provides descriptions of seven diaeta each (Plin. Ep. 2,17,2; 2,17,13; 2,17,20; 5,6,20; 5,6,27). Their symmetry in numbers as well as in their aesthetic evaluation is a deliberate literary design, linking both letters compositionally, without i…

Diaeus

(208 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Δίαιος; Díaios) of Megalopolis; a radical opponent of Rome, strategos of the Achaeans in 150/49, 148/7, and 146 BC. In 146 BC, D., together with  Critolaus led the league into catastrophe (Pol. 38,10,8; 18,7-12) [1. 127, 228]. Following a dispute with Menalcidas of Sparta over bribery and capital jurisdiction, D. travelled to Rome in 149/8, where the former had fled; the Senate, however, did not come to any decision (Paus. 7,11-12) [1. 220-222]. After an Achaean-Spartan passage at arms, M…

Diagoras

(491 words)

Author(s): Hölkeskamp, Karl-Joachim (Cologne) | Robbins, Emmet (Toronto) | Decker, Wolfgang (Cologne)
(Διαγόρας; Diagóras). [German version] [1] of Eretria Politician 6th cent. BC Towards the end of the 6th cent. BC (between 539 and 510?), D. overturned the ‘oligarchy of the knights’, allegedly for personal motives (Aristot. Pol. 5,5, 1306a 35-37) [1]. In posthumous tribute, a statue of D. was erected (Heraclides Lembus fr. 40 Dilts). Whether D. as nomothetes introduced a ‘democratic constitution’ [2], has to remain a moot point. Hölkeskamp, Karl-Joachim (Cologne) Bibliography 1 F. Geyer, Topographie und Gesch. der Insel Euboia 1, 1903, 66f. 2 H.-J. Gehrke, Stasis, 1985, 63f. …

Diagraphein, diagraphe

(253 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld)
[German version] (διαγράφειν, διαγραφή; diagráphein, diagraphḗ) . (1) In Attic procedural law, diagraphḗ referred to the deletion of a suit from the court list after the prosecutor had either abandoned the case or failed to pay the court fees, or if the defendant objected to the admissibility of the action either by   paragraphḗ (παραγραφή) or by   diamartyría (διαμαρτυρία). (2) The term diagraphḗ is also used for the registration of shares in mines leased from the polis, with their respective boundaries, in a register (Harpocr. s.v. διαγραφή). (3) Additionally, it is a banking ter…

Diaitetai

(279 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
(διαιτηταί; diaitētaí). [German version] [1] Private arbitrator In Greek law, diaitetai was the general term used for ‘private’ arbitrators, appointed with the agreement of both parties; empowered either to mediate or to settle the dispute in a binding and final decision (Dem. Or. 27,1; 59,47). Frequently, each party nominated an arbitrator assured of their confidence, and these then agreed on the appointment of a third, so that the arbitration was accomplished by a total of three diaitetai. Thür, Gerhard (Graz) [German version] [2] Athenian board for preliminary proceedings …

Diakonos

(313 words)

Author(s): Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
[German version] (διάκονος; diákonos, literally ‘servant’). The word group διακονεῖν/ diakoneîn, diákonos, διακονία/ diakonía ─ ‘to serve’ (especially at table), ‘servant’, ‘service’ ─ emphasized service as a favour to someone while δουλεύειν/ douleúein etc. emphasized the dependency relationship in service. Therefore, in the NT diakonía generally describes a ‘service’ modelled on the brotherly love of Jesus, whose work of salvation was understood as a ‘service’ to humanity (Mk 10,45). Diakonos as the term for a church office is only tentatively encountered in th…

Dialect

(224 words)

Author(s): García-Ramón, José Luis (Cologne)
[German version] Dialect (Greek διάλεκτος; diálektos) is defined as a geographical variation of a linguistic continuum whose spatial extent can be classified in a variety of ways. For example, the  Arcadian or  Thessalian dialects of Greek are themselves differentiated by a number of local variations. Isoglosses (common features, esp. phonological, morphological, and lexical ones) result in a dialect geography. The earliest levels of a dialect structure of the Greek language, beginning in the 2nd millennium BC, and, linked with that, the homelands and m…

Dialecticians

(365 words)

Author(s): Hülser, Karl-Heinz (Constance)
[German version] The term dialectician (διαλεκτικός; dialektikós), ‘practised in discourse’, was initially used to describe someone ‘who knows how to ask questions and answer them’ (Pl. Crat. 390c), i.e. a logician according to the contemporary appreciation of his most important ability. The understanding of the term then shifted, so that it either continued to comprise all logicians (as e.g. in Aristot. Top. 8,2,157a 19; Cic. Acad. 2,143; S. Emp. P.H. 2,166) or only referred to a certain group of log…

Dialectics

(1,230 words)

Author(s): Kranz, Margarita
Kranz, Margarita [German version] A. Logic und Rhetoric (CT) From late Classical times to the present the word dialectics stands for a variety of sometimes sharply differentiated concepts. They are all derived more or less directly from Classical definitions. In Classical Antiquity dialectics can mean thinking in antitheses, something which may be traced back to Zeno or Heraclitus, a methodological questioning process, the art of a well-balanced discourse, as we find it in Plato's dialogues, or in philosophy or s…
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