Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Doberus

(75 words)

Author(s): Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] (Δόβηρος; Dóbēros). City in Paeonia, probably in the valley of the Strymon. Place of assembly for Sitalces' assault on the Macedonian kingdom in 432 BC (Thuc. 2,98,2). Absorbed into Macedon (possibly under Philip II), D. became a civitas of the Roman province of Macedonia (Plin. HN 4,35). Pillaged by the Goths in AD 267 (Zos. 1,43); diocese (Council of Chalcedon). Errington, Robert Malcolm (Marburg/Lahn) Bibliography F. Papazoglou, Les villes de Macédoine, 1988, 328f.

Docimus

(102 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Δόκιμος; Dókimos). Appointed satrap of Babylon by  Perdiccas in 323 BC (Arr. Succ. 24,3-5). Condemned after Perdiccas' death, he fled to Asia Minor and supported  Alcetas [4] and  Attalus [2] against  Eumenes. Defeated along with his allies by  Antigonus Monophthalmus and imprisoned in a fortress, he betrayed them in an escape attempt and went over to Antigonus (Diod. Sic. 19,16), who quickly promoted him. In Phrygia he founded a city Dokimeion. In 302 he allied himself with Lysimachus (Diod. Sic. 20,107,3). His later history is unknown. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, …

Dock­yards

(346 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (νεώρια/ neṓria, neut. pl.; Lat. navalia, neut. pl.). There is no evidence of dockyards as permanent structural establishment for  shipbuilding in the early Greek period; shipbuilding took place as a specialized part of the   materiatio at places chosen on an ad hoc basis in each case close to coasts or harbours (Pylos [1]; cf. Hom. Od. 6,263-272). At the latest since the early 6th cent. BC, as a feature of the autonomy of the Greek  polis, dockyards were part of the infrastructure of the navy ( navies) in the same way as…

Doclea

(196 words)

Author(s): Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Moesi, Moesia Settlement of the Illyrian Docleates (Ptol. 2,16,12; App. Ill. 16,46; Ptol. 2,16,8; Plin. HN 3,143; princeps civitatis Docleatium, ILJug 1853 [1]) in the interior of Crna Gora (Montenegro), now Duklja, at the junction of the Zeta and Morača in the Podgorica (formerly Titograd) region; was later a Flavian municipium Docleatium in the prov. Dalmatia ( Dalmatae, Dalmatia), confirmed in several inscriptions (collected by Sticotti [2]) as res p(ublica) Docleatium. Ruler cult attested. Excavations have …

Doctor

(17 words)

[No German version] [1] see  Medicine [No German version] [2] see  Munus, Munera III E

Doctrina Addai

(207 words)

Author(s): Brock, Sebastian P. (Oxford)
[German version] This Syrian tale recounts Addai's legendary missionary activity in Edessa and the subsequent conversion of King Abgar ‘the Black’ ( Abgar Legend). The beginning, which has its only parallel in the Greek version by Eusebius (HE 1,13), describes Abgar's exchange of correspondence with Jesus and Addai's arrival in  Edessa (in Eusebius: Thaddaios). The Doctrina Addai however, provides additional new information, in particular about a portrait of Jesus by Ḥannan, Abgar's emissary, the precursor of the Mandylion of later tradition, and…

Doctrina Iacobi

(274 words)

Author(s): Speck, Paul (Berlin)
[German version] The Doctrina Iacobi nuper baptizati, believed to date from the 7th cent., recounts how in his youth the Jew Jacob amused himself by beating up Christians. How, during a stay in  Carthage he was compulsorily baptized, like all Jews in the Empire, on the order of Emperor  Heraclius, and then, after a vision, he confessed to the baptism and acquired a comprehensive theological knowledge; and how, in long, secret debates, he convinced all compulsorily baptized Jews and a passing Jewish tr…

Doctrina patrum de incarnatione verbi

(79 words)

Author(s): Rist, Josef (Würzburg)
[German version] Dogmatic florilegium, dating from the end of the 7th into the 8th cent. AD, that was put together from already existing but now partially lost Christological collections (i.a. ch. 24 and 33) and wrongly ascribed to the apocrisiary  Anastasius [3] († 666) or the abbot  Anastasius Sinaites [5] (died shortly after 700). Rist, Josef (Würzburg) Bibliography Edition: F. Diekamp, D., 1907. Bibliography: A. Grillmeier, Jesus der Christus im Glauben der Kirche 2/1, 21991, 94-100.

Document hand

(384 words)

Author(s): Menci, Giovanna (Florence) | Eleuteri, Paolo (Venice)
[German version] I. Greek The Greek  documents passed down on papyri ( Papyrus) and ostraka (  óstrakon ) are mostly written in cursive script ( Writing, styles of) or chancellery script. However, in the case of the earliest testimonials of the Greek script in Egypt (4th to the beginning of the 3rd cent. BC) when there was still no significant difference between an actual cursive script and the book hand in the  epigraphical style, the few documents passed down were written in book hands. …

Documents

(6,763 words)

Author(s): Hengstl, Joachim (Marburg/Lahn) | Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen) | Gröschler, Peter
I. General [German version] A. Term In legal terms, a document is a written declaration regarding a legal transaction. In modern opinion it is a declaration of intent in a suitable written form that is intended to provide proof in legal transactions and that permits recognition of the issuing party (e.g., [2; 8]). In general, documents include all non-literary and partially literary texts (exceptions are, e.g., poetry and amulets), i.e., apart from business documents, trial and administrative document…

Dodekadrachmon

(86 words)

Author(s): Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] (only adjective δωδεκάδραχμος; dōdekádrachmos). Silver twelve drachmas coin that was minted in northern Greece in the Attic standard and in Ptolemaic Egypt and in Carthaginian Sicily with a weight of 44,3-45,5 g.  Drachma;  Coinage, standards of Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover) Bibliography Schrötter, 150 M. N. Tod, Epigraphical Notes on Greek Coinage, in: NC 6.20, 1960, 1-24 G. K. Jenkins, Coins of Punic Sicily, in: SNR 57, 1978, 5-68, especially 36ff. J. M. Jones, A dictionary of Ancient Greek coins, 1986, 81 O. Mørkholm, Early Hellenistic coinage, 1991, 106.

Dodekapolis

(227 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] (Δωδεκάπολις; Dōdekápolis, ‘Twelve Town’). Name of several, not always historically verifiable, Greek leagues of towns 1. Hdt. 1,145 mentions  Aegae [2],  Aegira,  Aegium,  Bura,  Dyme,  Helice [1],  Olenus,  Patrae,  Pharaea and  Tritaea [2] as members of the Achaean dodekapolis, which the Achaeans are said to have taken from the Iones when they drove them out. 2. On the Aeolian dodekapolis cf. Aeoles [2]. 3. According to Hdt. 1,142, in the 6th cent. BC the Ionian dodekapolis consisted of  Chios,  Ephesus,  Erythrae,  Clazomenae,  Colophon,  Lebedus,  M…

Dodekaschoinos

(113 words)

Author(s): Seidlmayer, Stephan Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] ‘Twelve mile land’, term in the Graeco-Roman period (Ptol. 4,5,74 and Hdt. 2,29) for the c. 135 km long northern sector of Nubia between  Syene and Takompso ( Tqmps)/Hierosycaminus (al-Maharraqa) [1] that was transferred by the rulers to the temple of  Isis at  Philae mainly for the levy of taxes on the transport of goods. In a stone stele at Seḥel claiming to date back to the Old Kingdom, but in fact probably from the time of Ptolemy V, the priesthood of the Chnum temple at  Elephantine claims older rights to this region [2]. Seidlmayer, Stephan Johannes (Berlin) Bibliogra…

Dodona, Dodone

(1,049 words)

Author(s): Strauch, Daniel (Berlin) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Dark Ages | Oracles | Persian Wars | Aegean Koine | Education / Culture (Δωδώνη; Dōdṓnē). [German version] I. Topography, historical development Sanctuary and settlement in Epirus, 22 km south-west of today's Ioannina in the 640 m high plain of Hellopia beneath the Tomarus [1. 85-87, 92]. D. is the oldest oracle site in Greece attested in literature (myth of its founding in Hdt. 2,54f. [2. 51-54]), already known to the Homeric epics (Il. 16,233-235; Od. 19,296-301). The or…

Dodrans

(112 words)

Author(s): Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] In the Roman system of weights and measures the dodrans denotes 3/4 (9/12) of the whole unit (the whole dempto quadrante). The dodrans was used in measuring length ( pes) and surface area ( iugerum), in laws of inheritance and obligations and in calculating time. Based on the Roman pound ( libra: 327,45 gm), it weighed 245,59 gm [1. 150]. The dodrans appeared as a coin under M. Metellus in 127 BC (bust of Vulcanus/Prora), as also a year later under C. Cassius, together with the Bes, minted in bronze with the value marking S [2. 288; 290].  Bes;  Iugerum;  Libra;  Pes Mlasowsk…

Dodwell Painter

(133 words)

Author(s): Steinhart, Matthias (Freiburg)
[German version] Middle Corinthian vase-painter from around 580/570 BC, who specialized in pyxides and oinochoai but also painted neck-amphoras and hydriai; generally with friezes of animals and riders. The pyxis in Munich (SA, so-called Dodwell Pyxis) with the Calydonian boar hunt and other mythical figures (the accompanying names are partly incorrect) is outstanding, as are also two careful friezes on the olpe in Rome (VG): revellers dancing around a krater, and Hercules fighting the Hydra. In o…

Doedalses

(269 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld)
[German version] [1] Sculptor whose existence is contested Sculptor whose existence is contested. Pliny (HN 36,35) mentions a work in marble in Rome Venerem lavantem †sesededalsa† stantem, from which the Bithynian name D. is gleaned, an emendation which is largely accepted. This D. is then identified with Daedalus, who according to a Byzantine source created a Zeus Stratios for the Bithynian King Nicomedes. The statue type of that Zeus has not been established with any certainty. The statue of the standing Venus that Pli…

Dog

(1,444 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] [1] An animal (κύων/ kýōn, κυνίδιον/ kynídion, κυνίσκος/ kynískos, σκύλαξ/ skýlax, σκυλάκιον/ skylákion, canis, canicula, catellus). Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) [German version] A. Breeds One of the oldest domestic animals, bred in various parts of the world, probably starting in the Mesolithic era, from varieties of wild dogs that have now died out. The theory of its descent from the golden jackal ( Canis aureus) [2] has now been abandoned. From bone remains and from graphic representations several early breeds can be identified as the a…

Dog Latin

(456 words)

Author(s): Bräunl, Christoph (Bonn RWG)
[English version] A pejorative term for faulty Latin interspersed with 'barbarisms' and nonstandard or ungrammatical forms. The oldest known evidence for the origin of the term Dog Latin (DL) (aka Kitchen Latin/German Küchenlatein) is found in Lorenzo Valla's Apologus (1452/1453) in the context of a debate about correct Latin. Guarino da Verona, his cook Parmeno, and stableman Dromo engage in a biting critique of the language of certain passages in a letter by Poggio Bracciolini; Poggio is accused of having learned Latin from his cook, and of using culinaria vocabula; as a result  he…

Dogmatists

(632 words)

Author(s): Frede, Michael (Oxford) | Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] [1] Philosophers Originally a sceptical expression to designate those who adopt as their own a view ( dógma; cf. S. Emp. P.H. 1,13) ─ especially a philosophical or scientific view ─ which, in sceptical thinking, cannot be justified let alone proven (S. Emp. P.H. 1,3). Also applied by the Pyrrhonians in an extended sense to those Academicians who adopted views such as that nothing can be known (cf. the ἰδίως/ idíōs in S. Emp., ibid.). Because of the close link between empiricism and Scepticism in medicine, the term ‘Dogmatists’ was often also applied…
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