Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Ghazni

(89 words)

Author(s): Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin)
[German version] Finds of coins from the period of the Indo-Greek kings  Artemidorus [1], Peucolas and  Archebius (around 130 BC) and the Saka king Azes I (around 70 BC) prove that G. was an important centre in the Graeco-Bactrian period. The Buddhist monastery of Tapa Sardar (2nd-4th cents. AD) discovered closeby and buildings of the Islamic Ghaznowid dynasty of the 11th-12th cents. attest to the continuous importance of the region. Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) Bibliography F. R. Allchin, N. Hammond, The Archaeology of Afghanistan from the earliest times to the Timuri…

Ghiaccio Forte

(125 words)

Author(s): Miller, Martin (Berlin)
[German version] In antiquity the Etruscan settlement situated on a hill that was flat on top and fell away steeply on the edges, 14 km south-east of Scansano, probably belonged to the area of influence of Vulci. In the 6th cent. BC there was a rural sanctuary here. A settlement can only be proven for the late 4th and early 3rd cents. BC. The settlement that was fortified by a surrounding wall made of large blocks with rough stone filling was violently destroyed in about 280 BC. American excavatio…

Gi­ants

(1,148 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Ley, Anne (Xanten)
(Γίγαντες; Gígantes). [German version] I. Mythology Giants are usually huge, clumsy beings from primeval times; according to the commonest myth, the  Gigantomachy, they attempted unsuccessfully to deprive Zeus and the Olympians of power. In Homer the Giants are a lawless and arrogant marginal people destroyed because of their king  Eurymedon (Hom. Od. 7,59-61); they settled close to the  Cyclopes and  Phaeaces (Hom. Od. 7,205f.). According to Hesiod, during the castration of  Uranus, drops of blood fa…

Gibeon

(171 words)

Author(s): Donner, Herbert (Tübingen)
[German version] Town in the Ephraimitic mountains. G. was one of the Canaanite city states of the southern transverse run that separated the northern and southern part of the Israelite settlement area in Palestine (Jos 9 and passim). According to the literary testimonies (OT, Hellenistic-Roman and Byzantine authors; e.g. Eus. On. 66,11-16), it must have been settled at least from the late Bronze Age (2nd half of the 2nd millennium BC) until after the beginning of the Common Era. It is true that the identification with al-Ǧib c. 9 km north-west of Jerusalem has not been proven wi…

Gift exchange

(6 words)

see Presents, gifts

Gigantomachy

(376 words)

Author(s): Latacz, Joachim (Basle)
[German version] (γιγαντομαχία; gigantomachía, Plato and others, γιγαντία; gigantía, Philostratus; Gigantomachia Claudianus and others). Battle of the  Giants against the (Olympian) gods for the rule of the world, usually set in Phlegrae or  Phlegra (e.g. Aesch. Eum. 295; Eur. HF 1194; Ion 988) that was, in a second step, equated with the peninsula of  Pallene (e.g. Hdt. 7,123); won by the gods with the help of  Heracles (the role of Heracles probably mentioned for the first time in Hes. Theog. 954 [1. 41…

Gigonus

(113 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
[German version] (Γίγωνος; Gígōnos). The town situated close to Cape Gigonis, that is probably to be found north-west of modern Nea Kallikrateia on the west coast of the Chalcidian Peninsula, is mentioned in Hdt. 7,123,2 with regard to the campaign of Xerxes; G. is also mentioned in the Athenian tribute quota lists between 434/3 and 421 BC and for 432 as the line of communication of an Athenian army marching from Macedonia to Poteidaia (Thuc. 1,61,5; 62,2), then however, like the cape, it is only mentioned again in the geographical literature. Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel) Bibliography F. Papazo…

Gigthis

(110 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Town on the Lesser Syrte, 30 km north-east of Medenine, modern Bou Grara. Evidence: Ptol. 4,3,11; It. Ant. 60,1; 518,5; Tab. Peut. 6,5. G. was presumably a Phoenician or Punic settlement and in later times perhaps the outlying area of the Cinithi, the allies of  Tacfarinas. Under Hadrian or Antoninus Pius the town was accorded ius Latii maius, and under Antoninus Pius (AD 138-161) it became a municipium (CIL VIII Suppl. 4, 22707). Further inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 25-34; Suppl. 1, 11017-11047; Suppl. 4, 22691-22757. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography S. Lancel, E. Lip…

Gigurri

(161 words)

Author(s): Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam)
[German version] (Georres, Giorres). In Valdeorras on the upper Sil (Province of Orense) the inscription ILS I 2079 was found on which a Roman soldier with the Celtic epithet (according to [2. 1089]) Reburrus is called Gigurrus Calubrigensis. Calubriga is the (according to [1. 705]) Celtic name of an unknown town (assumptions in this regard in [3. 95]). The Asturian tribe of the G. is mentioned on several occasions (Plin. HN 3,28; Ptol. 2,6,37; Geogr. Rav. 4,45). As Valdeorras was called Val de Geurrez or Jurrez in the Middle Ages…

Gilda

(61 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Town in Mauretania Tingitana, north-west of Volubilis, perhaps identifiable with Souk el-Arba of Sidi Slimane. Evidence: Mela 3,107; Ptol. 4,1,13 (Σίλδα; Sílda); It. Ant. 23,4; Steph. Byz. s.v. Γίλδα; Geogr. Rav. p. 43,3 (?). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography M. Euzennat, Les voies romaines du Maroc ..., in: M. Renard (ed.), Hommages à A. Grenier II (Coll. Latomus 58), 1962, 599f.

Gildas

(154 words)

Author(s): Johne, Klaus-Peter (Berlin)
[German version] Oldest historian of the Britons with the epithet Sapiens. G. was a Romanized Celt from western Britain, was born before AD 504 and wrote before 547, as a Christian who was fully committed to Roman culture, the work De excidio et conquestu Britanniae that was important for the history of the island during and after the decline of Roman rule. A description of the topography is followed by the history in Roman times, emphasizing the events of Church history. The invasion of the Anglo-Saxons is interpreted as a punishment fro…

Gildilas

(57 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] Eastern Goth, comes Syracusanae civitatis in AD 526/7, commander of the province of Sicilia, known from two letters of  Athalaric (Cassiod. Var. 9,11; 14) who threatened the comes Gotharum G. with dismissal from office because of serious irregularities in the levying of taxes and in legal decisions. Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)

Gildo

(482 words)

Author(s): Redies, Michael (Berlin)
[German version] Son of the Moorish king Nubel and brother of Firmus (Amm. Marc. 29,5,6), born before AD 330, executed on 31 July 398. In the rebellion of his brother Firmus, G. supported the magister militum Theodosius in 373-375 and distinguished himself by arresting the vicarius of Romanus, Vincentius, and two rebellious leaders, Belles and Fericius (Amm. Marc. 29,5,6; 21; 24). In about 386 G. was elevated to the position of comes Africae (Oros. 7,36). He was initially on friendly terms with the usurper Maximus, with whom he had served in the battle against Firmu…

Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh Epic

(592 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Gilgameš, Gilgameš Epic). G., legendary ruler of  Uruk in southern Mesopotamia; linked in the sources passed down to us with the construction of the 9-km long city wall of Uruk around 2900 BC. Non-literary sources already mention G. about 2700 BC. The rulers of the 3rd dynasty of Ur (21st cent. BC) originating in Uruk maintained that they were genealogically connected with G. and therefore fostered the stories passed down about G. and his equally legendary predecessors ( Epic) in…

Gilgamos

(5 words)

see  Gilgamesh Epic

Gillium

(69 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] Town in Africa proconsularis, situated west of  Thubursicum Bure, modern Henchir Frass. Inscriptions: Revue Tunisienne 6, 1899, 447 (new Punic); CIL VIII suppl. 4, 26222-26236 ( decuriones Gillitani, 3rd cent. AD). Victor Tonnennensis mentions an abbot of the monasterium Gillense or Gillitanum (Chron. min. II p. 203, 553,1; 204, 557,2) for the years 553 and 557. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AATun (1:50 000), sheet 32, no. 11.

Ginger

(80 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] Through Plin. HN 12,28 we know that the Romans did not import the rhizome of the zingiber or zimpiber (Zingiber officinalis L.), a bitter-tasting spice, from Asia like today but from Arabia and Troglodytia (southern Egypt). Palladius used it to spice preserved quinces (Agric. 11,20,2). Dioscorides attributes to the zingíberi a warming, stomach-friendly effect (2,160 Wellmann = 2,189 Berendes). It helped with cataracts and in antidotes. Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) Bibliography R. Stadler, s.v. Ingwer, RE IX 2, 1554.

Gir

(72 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] River that has its source in the high Atlas Mountains, presumably the Oued Guir. C.  Suetonius Paullinus advanced to it with his troops in AD 42. References: Plin. HN 5,15 ( Ger); Ptol. 4,6,13; 16; 31 (Γείρ; Geír); Geogr. Rav. p. 2,69; 3,14; 36,28; 37,11 ( Ger); Claud. Carm. 21,252 ( Gir); Anon. Geographia Compendiaria 31 (GGM II 502; Γίρ; Gír). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography H. Dessau, s.v. G., RE VII 1, 1366.

Gi­raffe

(280 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[German version] The ancient sources give varying accounts of the place of origin of the giraffe ( Camelopardalis girafa): Agatharchides (De mare rubro = Phot. bibl. 250,455b 4 B.) considers that it was among the Troglodytae in Nubia, Plin. HN 8,69 under the name nabun it had there in Ethiopia, Artemidorus of Ephesus (Str. 16,775) locates it in Arabia, whilst Paus. 9,21,2 places it in India. The name καμηλοπάρδαλις, camelopardalis ( -parda, -pardala) comes from similarities with the camel and panther: ‘it has the figure of a camel but the spots of a panther’ (Varro,…

Gisco, Giscon

(5 words)

see  Geskon
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