Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

Subscriptions: see brill.com

Micali Painter

(107 words)

Author(s): Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen)
[German version] An important Etruscan vase-painter of the black-figure style ( Vase painting, black-figured) with a workshop at Vulci (ca. 530-500 BC); attribution by Beazley, refined by Spivey. He displays a penchant for ornamental motifs and winged creatures such as sirens, sphinxes and pegasi. The figures are often elongated and drawn with expressive gestures: they are initially under strong Ionian, later Attic influence. Battle scenes are dominant among motifs of mythical imagery. The workshop continued, at a lower level of achievement, until the early 5th. cent. (Spivey). Pr…

Micare

(5 words)

see Guessing games

Miccalus

(47 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin)
[German version] (Μίκκαλος; Míkkalos). Antiochene, brother of the provincial governors Evagrius and Olympius. He was himself administrator of Thrace in AD 362. Libanius describes his dispute with his brother Olympius (Lib. Or. 63,30-35; cf. also Lib. Epist. 97-99, 149). PLRE 1, 602. Portmann, Werner (Berlin)

Micciades

(99 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Μικκιάδης; Mikkiádes). Father of Archermus, of Chios. Pliny (HN 36,11) places him at the head of a Chian family of sculptors, erroneously giving him as the son of one Melas [4]. However, the source which Pliny misread (and which survives), a votive epigram from Delos, dated to approx. 550 BC, does not say that M. was a sculptor. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Overbeck, No. 314 Loewy, No.1 J. Marcadé, Recueil des signatures de sculpteurs grecs, Vol. 2, 1957, 75 B. S. Ridgway, The Nike of Archermos and Her Attire, in: J. Boardman (ed.), Chios, 1986, 259-274.

Michael

(1,757 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) | Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) | Brock, Sebastian P. (Oxford)
(Μιχαήλ/ Michaḗl; Mîkāēl). [German version] [1] Archangel Archangel, [1] One of the most prominent angels (cf. the description archistratēgós, ‘supreme commander’ of the heavenly host, Joseph of Aseneth 14,8, cf. Slavonic Hen 22,5; 33,10), one of the seven (Ethiopic Hen 20,5) or four (Ethiopic Hen 9,1; 10,11) archangels (cf. [1]). The name means ‘who is like God’ or ‘who is victorious like God’. M., who was first mentioned in the ‘Book of Watchers (Ethiopic Hen 1-36, end of the 4th/beginning of the 2nd cent. BC)…

Michaelios Grammatikos

(97 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] Otherwise unknown author of an epigram praising the image of Agathias (whom he extols as an orator and poet), of his brother and of his father Memnonius (Anth. Pal. 16,316). The poem will presumably have been affixed to the base of a statuary group in Myrina [4] (the town in l. 1), perhaps not long after the death of Agathias (after AD 580). Identification with later poets of the same name is improbable. Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) Bibliography Av. and A. Cameron, The Cycle of Agathias, in: JHS 86, 1966, 8, Note 18.

Micines

(51 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald)
[German version] (Μικίνης; Mikínēs). An Athenian, whose name is known only because he was murdered in the streets of Athens one night between 403 and 380 BC. Lysias wrote a speech for the ensuing trial, which subsequently became famous (Fragment 90 Thalheim, hypothesis of Antiphon 2a). Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald)

Micion

(247 words)

Author(s): Dreyer, Boris (Göttingen)
[German version] (Μικίων; Mikíōn). Son of M., from Cephisia. Shortly after 230 BC he and his brother Euryclides saw to it that the Macedonian troops in Piraeus under Diogenes [1] were paid and hence left (IG II2 834, 10ff.; [1. 79ff.; 118ff.]). He had helped Athens before (in 248/7; at the time perhaps agōnothétēs: IG II2 1705), when it was threatened from outside (Agora XVI 213 I 35, cf. [2. 26ff.]). From the 240s until the 220s M. and his brother rejected an alliance with Aratus [2] on ground of neutrality (Plut. Aratus 24; 33-34; 41; Pol. 5,106; …

Micipsa

(212 words)

Author(s): Meißner, Burkhard (Halle/Saale)
[German version] (Μικίψας/ Mikípsas). Eldest heir of Massinissa. He, Mastanabal and Gulussa were regents after Massinissa's death in 148 BC. He was in charge of the royal residence of Cirta (App. Lib. 106; Zon. 9,27 D.). After the death of his two brothers M. ruled alone (Sall. Iug. 5). In the Iberian theatre of war and in Sardinia M. and Mastanabal supported Rome with troops and supplies (App. Lib. 111; Sall. Iug. 7-8; Vell. 2,9,4; Plut. C. Gracchus 23,5). In 134 M. sent Iugurtha with auxiliary tr…

Micon

(368 words)

Author(s): Hoesch, Nicola (Munich)
[German version] (Μίκων/ Míkōn). Greek painter and sculptor (Plin. HN 34,88) from Athens, active between 475 and 440 BC. He and Polygnotus belonged to the first important generation of the Attic painting school in the early classical period, which broke ground for the development of the great Greek painting. None of the wall paintings in Athens known from numerous written sources of various periods survives, but frequent mention does allow us to infer his great significance. His main patron was Cim…

Micythion

(132 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Μικυθίων; Mikythíōn) from Chalcis [2], son of Mikylion (Syll.3 585, 235f.), an influential friend of the Romans, who in the years 198-192 BC stopped a pro-Aetolian or a pro-Seleucid movement in Chalcis but then had to flee before the Seleucid king Antiochus [5] III. (Liv. 35,38,1-12; 46,9-13; 50,10; 51,4; 6; Diod. 29,1) [1. 81-84; 130]. He returned after the Roman victory and continued to be part of the principes (compare IG XII 9,904).In 179/8 BC he acted as próxenos in Delphi (Syll.3 585,235f.). In 170 BC, in spite of his great age and difficulty in walking…

Micythus

(130 words)

Author(s): Patzek, Barbara (Wiesbaden)
[German version] (Μίκυθος; Míkythos). Son of Chirus, from the house of the tyrant Anaxilaus [1] of Rhegium. For nine years after Anaxilaus' death around 476 BC he was governor (ἐπίτροπος; epítropos) of Rhegium for his sons who were not legally of age (Hdt. 7, 170; Iust. 4,2,5; Diod. 11,48ff.). M. helped the people of Tarentum against the tribes of the Iapyges but suffered huge losses to his army. Probably after an intervention of Hieron [1] of Syracuse he handed over control to Anaxilaus' sons and went to Tegea in Arcadia. F…

Midaeum

(130 words)

Author(s): Drew-Bear, Thomas (Lyon)
[German version] (Μίδαιον/ Mídaion; Μιδάειον/ Midáeion). City named after its legendary founder king Midas (on coins from M.). Near the River Tembris (Porsuk Çayı; on coins from M.) in Phrygia Epictetus (Str. 12,8,12) at Karahöyük on a high hill. Inhabited from Phrygian until Byzantine times. To the east of Dorylaeum on the road to Pessinus (Tab. Peut. 9,3). As early as the 5th cent. BC mentioned by Hellanicus (FGrH 4 F 17). Sextus Pompeius was captured here in 36 BC (Cass. Dio 49,18,4). M. was in the conventus of Synnada (Plin. HN 5,105). It minted coins from Augustus until Phili…

Midas

(755 words)

Author(s): Högemann, Peter (Tübingen) | Scherf, Johannes (Tübingen)
(Μίδας/ Mídas). [German version] I. Historical King of Phrygia, son of Gordius [1]. Assyrian sources document him as Mit-ta-a, ‘king of the land of Muski, ’ for 718-709 BC. In the epichoric inscriptions of Yazılıkaya (‘city of Midas’) the name M. is found in conjunction with the titles laagtei and anaktei. The name M. is more likely Old Anatolian than Phrygian. According to Assyrian sources M. conspired with the Luwian kings of Atuna (Tyana), Karkemiš, Gurgum and Malida against Sargon II, until he - snubbing Urarṭu and fearing the Cimmerians - placed hi…

Middle Comedy

(5 words)

see Comedy

Middle Greek

(5 words)

see Greek

Middle Platonism

(2,676 words)

Author(s): Baltes, Matthias (Münster)
[German version] A. Definition Since K. Praechter, Middle Platonism has been the term for the period of ancient Platonism from the return of the Platonic Academy to dogmatism under Antiochus [20] of Ascalon (died 69 BC) until the beginning of Neoplatonism under Plotinus (died 270 AD; Dogmatists [1]; Neoplatonists). The term is modern, but the periodization is ancient in as far as the Neoplatonists themselves distinguished between the ‘old exegetes’ before Plotinus and the ‘new ones’ (Procl. in Pl. …

Midea

(306 words)

Author(s): Lafond, Yves (Bochum) | Meyer, Ernst (Zürich) | Funke, Peter (Münster)
(Μίδεια; Mídeia or Μιδέα; Midéa). [German version] [1] City in Argolis This item can be found on the following maps: Mycenaean culture and archaeology | Mineral Resources City in Argolis, in mythology (cf. Paus. 2,16; 25) one of the most important cities in the region. It had a Mycenaean citadel and palace on a steep hill about 1 km from modern Dendra in the northeast of the Argolian plain. Already abandoned in the Mycenaean period. Tholos tombs with rich finds, several burial chambers. New excavations started in 1983. Th…

Midian

(128 words)

Author(s): Podella, Thomas (Lübeck)
[German version] [1] Son of Abraham and Keturah Son of Abraham and Keturah in the genealogy of Genesis (Gn 25,2). Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) [German version] [2] Locality south of Edom (Hebrew midyān, Arab madyān). In the OT, name of a region south of Edom and east of the Gulf of Aqaba. The region is presumably the homeland of the later Israelite national god Yahweh. Settlement, trade, pottery making and camel breeding are attested archaeologically since the 13th/12th cent BC. From the 8th cents. BC., the Midianites were also involved in Arabian trade along the Incense Road. Maesaimanes Pode…

Mididi

(106 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Punic M(j)ddm). An ancient Berber locality southwest of Mactaris, the modern Henchir Meded. M. came under strong Punic influence. Some 25 Neo-Punic inscriptions dating from around the 1st cent. BC have been found to date, including votive inscriptions for Baal Hamon, who was replaced by Saturnus from about the 2nd cent. AD. Cf. also CIL VIII Suppl. 4, 23356 ( Mars patrius). Other inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 608-618; 2, 11772-11778; Suppl. 4, 23357-23394 a; AE 1985, 902 (?). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography Some E. Lipiński, s.v. M., DCPP, 292 F. Vattioni, M. e le sue …
▲   Back to top   ▲