Brill’s New Pauly

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Subject: Classical Studies

Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Moabite

(80 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Language of the inhabitants of Moab, a country to the south of the Dead Sea; it is very similar to Hebrew. Moabite is recorded on seal inscriptions and on a 34-line inscription of King Meša of Moab ( c. 850 BC), which was found in the vicinity of Diban (KAI 181). Canaanite; Semitic languages Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography A. Dearman (ed.), Studies in the Mesha Inscription and Moab, 1989  W.R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestine, 1000-586 BCE, 1985.

Moab, Moabitis

(652 words)

Author(s): Podella, Thomas (Lübeck)
[German version] (Hebrew môāb; Egyptian mb; Akkadian ma--a-ba, ma-a-ba, mu-a-ba; LXX Μωαβ/ Mōab; Jos. Ant. Iud. 1,205 Μώαβος/ Mṓabos; Ios. passim Μωαβῖται/ Mōabîtai). Term for a land, state and people to the east of the Dead Sea between Ammon [2] in the north and Edom in the south. The earliest evidence is found in Egyptian texts of Ramses II, in a relief with inscription at the Temple of  Luxor, and then primarily in the OT, in inscriptions of the Moabite king Meša (KAI 181) and in Neo-Assyrian sources. The etymology of the name is doubtful. Settlement has been proved as early as t…

Mobility

(1,274 words)

Author(s): Fellmeth, Ulrich (Stuttgart)
[German version] A. Definition The concept of spatial and social mobility means the - voluntary or involuntary - movement of people or social groups from one position to another: geographically (usually residential mobility) [1] or within a social structure (social mobility) [2. 224-234; 3. 572-576]. This modern concept must be applied with great care to historical circumstances. In Antiquity, there was nothing even approaching an idea of or a term for the modern definition of mobility. For mobility…

Mocadene

(93 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Μοκαδ(δ)ηνή; Mokad(d)ēnḗ). Region in eastern Lydia along the upper Hermus in Maeonia [1], on the border with Phrygia; its location was established through inscriptions naming places within it ( kṓmē Thermai Theséos, modern Kula Emir Hamamları; mētropóleis Silandus, modern Selendi, and Temenothyrae). It remains doubtful whether to associate Moccadeni, a dḗmos in Asia (incorrectly located in Bithynia in Ptol. Geog. 5,2,18), with Mocadene. Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg) Bibliography K. Buresch, Aus Lydien, 1898, 186 with map  J. Keil, s.v. M., RE 15, 2113  Id., s.v.…

Mochlos

(123 words)

Author(s): Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Μόχλος). Small island  situated on the north-east coast of Crete and south-east of the Gulf of Mirabello. In Antiquity the island was probably connected to the mainland by an isthmus. Costly finds from the Minoan necropolis indicate considerable prosperity. Mochlos was also important in Roman (remains of walls and towers) and Byzantine times. Roman containers for holding fish lie beneath the surface of the water close to the mainland. Sonnabend, Holger (Stuttgart) Bibliography H. Beister, s.v. M., in: Lauffer, Griechenland, 439  J.W. Myers et al., Aerial Atlas …

Mochus

(7 words)

see World, creation of the

Mocis(s)us

(86 words)

Author(s): Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt)
[German version] (Μωκισ(σ)ός/ Mṓkis(s)ós, also Mocesus, Iustinianupolis). Town in Cappadocia, which was rebuilt around 520 AD by Iustinianus I as a mountain stronghold (Procop. Aed. 5,4,15); present-day Viranşehir, to the south of Aksaray. It was probably relocated again at the end of the 7th cent. and was still a metropolitan seat in the 14th cent. Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) Bibliography A. Berger, Survey in Viranşehir (M.), in: Araştırma sonuçları toplantısı 13, 1996, 109-126; 14, 1997, 27-41; 15, 1998, 227-237  Hild/Restle, 238f.  W. Ruge, s.v. M., RE 15, 2514f.

Modalism

(39 words)

Author(s): May, Gerhard (Mainz)
[German version] The term modalism, which was used probably as early as the second half of the 17th cent., was finally established as a subcategory of Monarchianism by the work of A. von Harnack. May, Gerhard (Mainz)

Modares

(88 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] According to Zosimos (4,25,2-4) M. was a Goth of royal descent (relative of Athanaric [2. 189f.]. He went over to the Romans, received a military command and shortly after (380 AD?) in Thrace achieved a success (probably exaggerated by Zosimus [2. 77f.]) against pillaging Goths. Gregorius [3] of Nazianzus addressed two letters (epist. 136 and 137) to M. as magister militum. M. was a Christian but not an Arian [1. 388]. Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl) Bibliography 1 F. Paschoud, Zosime, vol. 2,2, 1979, 387f. 2 P. Heather, Goths and Romans, 1991.

Model

(6 words)

see Sculpting, technique of

Model/Cork model

(1,147 words)

Author(s): Gottwald, Franziska
Gottwald, Franziska [German version] A. Types and Functions (CT) Model (Italian: modello): a three-dimensional architectural representation of various materials (plaster, wood, metal, pottery etc.), miniaturized to scale and accurately depicting the original [1]. There is already evidence of symbolic models from ancient Egypt and Classical Antiquity (votive models); these continued to exist in the Middle Ages as founder models in a Christian context [2]. Early Renaissance (from 1350) saw the development …

Moderator

(112 words)

Author(s): Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Late antique collective term for those provincial governors who held the title of v ir clarissimus (Cod. Theod. 1,10,8 et passim), similar to rector or iudex. It was Justinian who in AD 535 first used moderator as a genuine official title for the governors of particular provinces with the rank of spectabilis (Court titles; Moderator Iustinianus Helenoponti, Nov. 28, Phoniciae ad Libanum, Edict. 4, Arabiae, Nov. 102). This last had civil and military authority. Occasionally moderator is also found as the title of officials who were not governors, includin…

Moderatus

(215 words)

Author(s): Frede, Michael (Oxford)
[German version] (Μοδέρατος/ Modératos) of Gades. Neo-Pythagorean, middle of the 1st cent. AD. He was the author of a work consisting of eleven books on the Pythagoreans (Porph. Vita Pythagorica 48), on which, it seems, all accounts about him are based. M. makes a sharper distinction than Numenius [6] does between Pythagoras and Plato, whom he (like Aristotle, Speusippus, Xenocrates and Aristoxenus) accused of appropriating Pythagorean ideas in such a way that made it easy for later authors not to …

Modern age

(7,464 words)

Author(s): Huber, Gabriele (Kassel RWG)
Huber, Gabriele (Kassel RWG) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) In 1883 Arnold Böcklin painted a picture with the title Odysseus and Calypso. Standing at the picture's left border and wrapped in a dark cloak, Odysseus turns his back to the viewer. He seems to be gazing longingly into the distance. He will soon build the raft that will bring him back to Ithaca. Calypso lies naked on a red cloth; she, for her part, casts a longing eye over her shoulder, but this glance is meant for the Homeric hero who is ignoring …

Modern Greek

(5 words)

see Greek

Modern Greek literature

(11,185 words)

Author(s): Niehoff-Panagiotidis, Johannes
Niehoff-Panagiotidis, Johannes [German version] A. Methodology and Definition (CT) When and where does Modern Greek Literature (MGL) begin? The answer to this question [33] transcends the usual chronological and methodological difficulties of drawing limits between neighbouring disciplines, with relations with Byzantine Studies posing the most serious difficulties. The approach followed by our handbooks, of either treating popular Byzantine literature separately from  works written in the standard langua…

Modes, Musical theory of

(595 words)

Author(s): Haas, Max (Basle)
[English version] Scales, i.e. melodies with defined spaces (intervals) between single tones, were handed down to the Middle Ages through the Institutio musica by Boethius. The material in this tradition is Greek in origin. It was, however, already incorrectly understood and interpreted by Boethius. On the basis of such text parts, a theory of keys was developed during the time that Gregorian chant was adapted. Today this theory is encompassed systematically under the heading of liturgical keys. (overviews: [1; 4]). …

Modestinus Herennius

(378 words)

Author(s): Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] (also: Herennius M.). Roman jurist, pupil of Ulpianus (cf. Dig. 47,2,52,20), from the Hellenistic east. It is likely that from AD 223 to 225 he was secretary a libellis to Alexander Severus, and in about 228 praefectus vigilum [4. 195f.]. A rescript of Gordianus [3] III (Cod. Iust. 3,42,5) of the year 239 follows his  ‘not-to-be-despised’ auctoritas as a respondent [3. 25f.]. It is doubtful that he gave the son of Maximinus [2] Thrax instruction in law (SHA Maximinus 27,5) [3. 118f.]. Apart from the Responsa (‘Expert Opinions’, 19 volumes) M. wrote Pandectae, linked t…

Modestus

(247 words)

Author(s): Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Gutsfeld, Andreas (Münster)
[German version] [1] Sab(inius?) M. Governor of the province of  Moesia inferior in AD 241, documented by coins of the city of Nicopolis [1. 504-518 nos. 2040-2107]. Accordingly he must previously have held the office of suffect consul. Franke, Thomas (Bochum) Bibliography 1 F. Imhoof-Blumer (ed.), Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenlands, vol. 1, 1898. PIR S 2  A. Stein, Die Legaten von Moesien, 1940, 100f. [German version] [2] Flavius Domitius M. Praefectus praetorio Orientis, from 369/370 to 378 (?) AD. Praefectus praetorio Orientis from AD 369/370 to 378 (?). Originally f…

Modius

(595 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
Roman surname. [German version] [1] M., Q. Horse breeder Cited by Varro (Rust. 2,7,1) as a distinguished horse breeder. His (probably invented) cognomen Equicolus, which indicates this activity, may have been interpreted by Varro as Aequicolus, so that a later period reveals a Septimus M. as the first king of the Aequiculi (Lib. de praenominibus 1). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] M. Fabidius Founder of the city of Cures Son of a virgin of the Aborigines who comes to dance in the sanctuary of Quirinus in the territory of Reate, but is then seized…
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