Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Thabena

(73 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] City in Africa Proconsularis (Africa [3]; Bell. Afr. 77,1 f.) on or near the coast on the border with the kingdom of Juba [1], probably not identifiable with Thenae. In the Roman Civil War in 47/46 BC the Thabenenses were on the side of Caesar; in 46 they strangled the soldiers that Juba had established in the city (Bell. Afr. loc.cit.). Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography H. Treidler, s. v. T., RE 5 A, 1178.

Thabraca

(127 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae (Θάβρακα; Thábraka). City probably of Punic origin (cf. CIL VIII 1, 5206: Imilcho Mytthum[balis]) on the northern coast of Tunisia, 10 km from the modern Algerian border (Ptol. 4,3,5; Pol. 12,1,4: Τάβρακα; Plin.  HN 5,22;  Juv. 10,194: Tabraca); of significance as a place of transshipment for marble from Simitthus; modern Tabarka. Inscriptions: CIL VIII 1,5198-5208; 2,10837; Suppl. 1, 17329-17391. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AATun 050, Bl. Tabarca; Bl. 7, Nr. 10  C. Lepelley, Les cités de l'Afrique…

Thagimasades

(45 words)

Author(s): Peter, Ulrike (Berlin)
[German version] (Θαγιμασάδης/ Thagimasádēs, also Θαγιμασάδας/ Thagimasádas). Presumed ancestor and protector of the 'Royal' Scythae (Scythae II.); they alone worshipped T. as a horse and water deity, which was identified with the Greek Poseidon (Hdt. 4,59). Peter, Ulrike (Berlin) Bibliography S. S. Bessonova, Religioznye predstavlenija skifov, 1983, 50-53.

Thais

(129 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Θαῖς/ Thaîs). Famous Athenian hetaíra ( Hetaírai ), eponymous heroine of comedies by Afranius [4] ([1. 229]), Hipparchus [2] and Menander [4] (PCG V 107; VI 2,122-127), all attested by quotations. Allegedly a mistress of Alexander [4] the Great, and later of Ptolemaeus [1] I, the father of her three children (Ath. 13,576d-e). According to Cleitarchus [2] at a feast she was the instigator of the burning of the Royal Buildings at Persepolis, as revenge on Xerxes (as in …

Thala

(139 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] City in the interior of Tunisia, 53 km to the south of Sicca Veneria, 20 km to the east of Ammaedara (also modern T.). The Numidian town was considerably Punicised; the original Punic cults of Caelestis, Pluto and Saturn continued until late Antiquity. In AD 20 followers of Tacfarinas unsuccessfully attacked a Roman unit in T. (Tac. Ann. 3,21,2). In the 3rd cent. T. presumably acquired the status of municipium . Inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 501-576; 2, 10519 f.; Suppl. 1, 11668-11730; Suppl. 4, 23280-23352; AE 1905, 35. Another town called T. was 20 km to the ea…

Thalamae

(178 words)

Author(s): Tausend, Sabine
(Θαλάμαι/ Thalámai). [German version] [1] Messenian perioikos community This item can be found on the following maps: Sparta | Achaeans, Achaea | Oracles Messenian perioikos community (Perioikoi; Paus. 3,1,4; 3,26,3) on the outer Mani (Taygetus) at modern Svina to the east of Koutiphari. Traces of Neolithic and Mycenaean (Late Helladic III A-B) settlement and remains of an incubation oracle of Ino/Pasiphae (Pasiphae) mentioned in Paus. 3,26,1. At the time of Hadrianus the sanctuary (Plut. Kleomenes 7; Plut. Agesilaos …

Thalamos

(145 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (θάλαμος/ thálamos). According to the earlier archaic perception a non-specific term for various rooms inside of a Greek house; according to more recent definition a bedroom of the master of the house or the women's apartments (cf. Hom. Il. 6,321; Hom. Od. 10,340 et passim), usually on the upper floor of a Classical Pastas or Prostas house (House [II] B) and therefore also according to Greek understanding belonging absolutely to the private sphere (Private sphere and public sphere). The ancient terminology is unclear; thalamos can also be the term for a weapo…

Thalassius

(456 words)

Author(s): Gutsfeld, Andreas (Münster) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
(Θαλάσσιος; Thalássios). [German version] [1] Follower of Constantius [2] II, 4th cent. AD (Thalassius). Praefectus praetorio Orientis 351-353, from a family of curiales [2] of the East. Little is known about his career, but T. was obviously a loyal follower of Constantius [2] II: in 345, he acted as the emperor's comes in Aquileia; in 351, he held a high office at his court in Cibalae (Zos. 2,48,5); still in the same year, T. - probably a Christian - entered into the office of praetorian prefect of the East (Artemii Passio…

Thalelaeus

(109 words)

Author(s): Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Professor of law ( antecessor) under Iustinianus [1] I, presumably in Berytus, one of the eight addresses of the Const. Omnem (ordinances for study brought into force with the conclusion of the Digesta in AD 533), who wrote a Greek paraphrase of the Codex (II.) Iustinianus. The work, preserved in the Basilika and their scholia (Byzantium I. B.3.), contains useful information on T.' teachings on the Codex. Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) Bibliography D. Simon, Aus dem Kodexunterricht des T., in: ZRG 86, 1969, 334-383; RIDA 16, 1969, 283-308; ZRG 87, 1…

Thales

(782 words)

Author(s): Betegh, Gábor (Budapest)
[German version] (Θαλῆς; Thalês). One of the Seven Sages, philosopher, astronomer and mathematician, said to be the founder of the Milesian School, 1st half of 6th cent. BC. Some anecdotes about T. survive, but no reliable biographical information. He is said to have travelled in Egypt. To what extent his erudition was influenced by the Near East is unknown. The ancient sources disagree as to whether T. recorded his theories in writing. Those who argue for it name the titles of three works: Ναυτικὴ ἀστρολογία ( Nautikḕ astrología, 'Nautical Astronomy', in hexameters), Περὶ τροπῆς ( Perì t…

Thaletas

(134 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Θαλήτας/ Thalḗtas; in some authors wrongly Thales, e.g. Paus. 1,14,4; Plut. Lycurgus 4), choral lyricist of the 7th cent. BC, from Gortyn (in Crete). Besides Xenodamus of Cythera, Xenocritus [1] of Locri and others, he was involved in various musical innovations in Sparta in the generation after Terpander (Plut. De musica 9,1134b-c). Like these, he composed paeans (Plut. loc.cit.) and hyporchḗmata (Schol. Pind. Pyth. 2,127). According to later authors of musical theory, he introduced paeonic and cretic rhythms to Sparta…

Thalia

(284 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
(Θάλεια/ Tháleia, Θαλία/ Thalía, Lat. Thalia; related to the Greek θάλλειν/ thállein, ‘to sprout, grow, thrive’, esp. in reference to fruit trees; cf. Diod. Sic. 4,7). Hesiod counts T. among (1) the Muses, (2) the Nereids and (3) the Charites; generally, she is related to the realm of fertility. Later literary references show a deliberately vague distinction between Muses and Charites. [German version] [1] Muse One of the Muses (Hes. Theog. 77), associated with comedies (e.g. Anth. Pal. 9,504; attribute: comic theatre mask; ‘the light muse’, cf. T.-Theater, Hamburg) as well as mi…

Thallo

(69 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
[German version] (Θαλλώ; Thallṓ). One of the Horae, the daughters of Zeus and Themis (Hes. Theog. 901-903; Hes. Op. 74 f.). The assignment of T. to the Horae or to the Charites is controversial, as are the number and names of the Horae (Hyg. Fab. 183; Paus. 9,35,1-4; Poll. 8,106). Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) Bibliography A. Lesky, s. v. Th., RE 5 A, 1214 f.  V. Machaira, s. v. Horai, LIMC 5.1, 502 f.; 5.2, 344-368.

Thallophoria

(245 words)

Author(s): Scherf, Johannes (Tübingen)
[German version] (θαλλοφορία/ thallophoría, 'carrying of branches'). At the Panathenaea the act, performed by selected old men (Xen. Symp. 4,17,4), of presenting branches; the term thallophoria is not recorded, but thallophóros ('branch carrier': Hsch. s. v.) and the verb thallophoreîn (Eust. in Hom. Od. 1157,24) are, and these both became proverbial (Aristoph. Vesp. 542 f. with schol.; Suet. perì blasphēmiôn 8,10) in with the meaning 'useful only for carrying branches'. To this extent the modern terminology [1. 278; 2. 1215] is motivated by analogous…

Thalna

(17 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum)
[German version] Roman cognomen probably of Etruscan origin, Iuventius [I 5-8]. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Schulze, 94.

Thalpius

(90 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θάλπιος; Thálpios). Grandson of Actor [4], son of the Actorion Eurytus and of Theraephone; he and Amphimachus [2], Diores [1] and Polyxenus [3] were leaders of the 40 Epeian ships at Troy (Hom. Il. 2,618-624; Paus. 5,3,3 f.; Dares 14; Dictys 1,17). T. is mentioned among the suitors of Helena [I 1] (Apollod. 3,129; Hyg. Fab. 81) and among those in the Trojan Horse (Q. Smyrn. 12,323), his grave is in Elis (Aristot. epigram 36, in [1]). Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography 1 Th. Bergk, Poetae Lyrici Graeci, vol. 2, 41882.

Thalysia

(132 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Θαλύσια/ Thalýsia), a word suggestive of 'abundance' (Gr. thalía, cf. thállō 'to bloom'), is a first-fruit sacrifice (Gr. aparchaí) for Artemis (Hom. Il. 9,534). Its antiquity is suggested by the name Thalysiades (Hom. Il. 4,458). Later it became particularly identified with Demeter; Theocritus situates his seventh Idyl on the day of a T. for Demeter. There also was a ‘thalysian’ bread, made from the first fruits (Athen. 3.114A), comparable to the thargēlos bread (Thargelia). Menander (Rhetor 391 Russell-Wilson) compares aparchaí in speeches with T. for Dem…

Thamudic

(115 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Refers not only to an Early North Arabian dialect that is recorded in graffiti in a modified Ancient South Arabian script (6th cent. BC to 4th cent. AD) throughout the Arabian peninsula, but, according to the most recent state of scholarship, to various individual dialects, namely Taymanic (Early Thamudic A) and Hismaic (Early Thamudic E) and southern Thamudic B, C, D. Hence it cannot be associated with the Arab Θαμυδῖται/ Thamydȋtai tribe alone. Ancient Southern Arabian; Arabic Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography 1 M. C. A. MacDonald, Reflections…

Thamugadi

(211 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Africa | | Coloniae | Limes City in the province of Numidia (Numidae), about 20 km to the east of Lambaesis (It. Ant. 34,1; 35,2; 40,7; Tab. Peut. 3,4), modern Timgad in Algeria. Founded in AD 100 by Munatius [II 4] Gallus as Colonia Marciana Traiana T. (CIL VIII Suppl. 2, 17842f.), probably the last pre-titular colonia [E] in Africa [3]. As the considerable remains show, the city swiftly flourished. Numidae influenced by the Poeni may have taken the cults of Caelestis, Saturn, …

Thamyras

(97 words)

Author(s): Michel, Simone (Hamburg)
[German version] (Θαμύρας; Thamýras). Name on five gems. Only the 18th century paste on a reliquary in the Vienna treasury is verifiably a copy of a missing gem with a Nereid from the period of Augustus. T. is deemed to be the signature of a gem-cutter from the circle of Dioscorides [8]. The other four 'signatures' are modern additions to ancient stones or elements of forgeries, probably following the Viennese model. Gem-cutting Michel, Simone (Hamburg) Bibliography E. Zwierlein-Diehl, T.-Gemmen, in: H.-U. Cain et al. (eds.), Beiträge zur Ikonographie und Hermeneutik, Fests…

Thamyris

(160 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Θάμυρις/ Thámyris, also Θαμύρας/ Thamýras). Mythical singer from Thrace (cf. Orpheus), who in human overestimation of himself challenges the Muses to compete with him and, naturally, loses (for the motif, cf. Marsyas [1], Niobe, Capaneus). As a punishment they take his gift of song away (again) and maim him (Hom. Il. 2,594-600, without further specifying this; Hes. Cat. 65 speaks of blinding). The same subject was probably dealt with by Sophocles in his tragedy Thamyris (TrGF 4 F 236-245), in which the poet himself appeared as an actor (Soph. Test. Ha …

Thanatos

(298 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
[German version] (Θάνατος/ Thánatos). Personification of death in Greek art and mythology, of practically no cultic significance. T. is the son of Nyx (night) and the twin brother of Hypnos (Sleep, cf. Somnus; Hes. Theog. 211f.; 756f.; Hom. Il. 14,231) with whom he transported the body of the dead Sarpedon [1] from Troy to Lycia (Hom. Il. 16,453-457; 16,671-683). This scene, a favourite on Attic vases from the late 6th cent. BC on, was adopted into every-day life in that T. and Hypnos function as e…

Thapsa

(51 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Θάψα). North African harbour town (Ps.-Scyl. 111; the place name is Punic), probably identical to Rusicade. In the 4th cent. BC, a distinction may possibly have been made between Cape Rusicade and the settlement Th. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, Bl. 8, Nr. 196  H. Treidler, s. v. Th., RE 5 A, 1271 f.

Thapsacus

(223 words)

Author(s): Röllig, Wolfgang (Tübingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Xenophon (Θάψακος/ T hápsakos; Latin Thapsacus). City in Syria, on the west bank of the Euphrates [2], important river port and Euphrates crossing (Semitic tiphsaḥ, 'crossing, ford'), first mentioned in 1 Kings 5,4 as a (fictional) border town in the northeast of Solomon's kingdom. It was at T. that Cyrus [3] the Younger crossed the Euphrates (Xen. An. 1,4,11 and 17 f.); a little later, as nauarchos, Conon [1] came to T., 20 days travel from the Cilician Gates [1] (Diod. Sic. 14,21,5), from where the river …

Thapsus

(352 words)

Author(s): Falco | Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
(Θάψος/ Thápsos). [German version] [1] Tongue of land on the east coast of Sicily Flat, sandy (Serv. Aen. 3,688) tongue of land on the east coast of Sicily, northwest of Syracusae, connected with the mainland via an isthmus of c. 100 m (Thuc. 6,97,1), modern Penisola di Magnisi. Around 730 BC Lamis from Megara [2] settled on T. after he had abandoned Trotilum and been driven out of Leontini; after his death, his companions left T. in order to make a new home in Megara [3] Hyblaia 7 km to the north (Thuc. 6,4,1). There was an empórion ('trade port') on T. from the 15t…

Thargelia

(230 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (θαργήλια/ Thargḗlia, also Targelia). The main festival connected with Apollo on the 6th and 7th days (resp. birthday of Artemis and Apollo) of the Attic/Ionian month Thargēliṓn (late April to late May). The etymology is not known; in Antiquity the name was linked with a stew, thárgēlos (e.g. Phot. ψ 22), made from first fruits offered up to the god. The importance of the festival is also shown in its onomastic productivity, cf. e.g. the Milesian courtesan T. (Hippias FGrH 6 F 3); indeed the festival was generally of great si…

Tharrus

(182 words)

Author(s): Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sardinia et Corsica | | Etrusci, Etruria | Colonization | Phoenicians, Poeni (Θάρρος/ Thárros; Latin Tharrus). Phoenician settlement (founded shortly before or c. 700 BC) on the western coast of Sardinia on the Sinis peninsula, which encloses to the west the Gulf of Oristano, between two indigenous nuraghic settlements; There are records of contacts with the Orient from the 2nd millennium BC onwards. Rich finds in the necropoleis (gold jewellery) and the topheth (vot…

Tharyps

(120 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
[German version] (Θάρυψ/ Tháryps). The T. mentioned in 429 BC as being under the guardianship of a Sabylinthus (Thuc. 2,80,6) is the first undoubtedly historical king of the Molossi. According to Plut. Pyrrhus 1,4 he made a name for himself as the first Molossian ruler by providing the cities with Greek customs, education and benign laws; according to Just. Epit. 17,3,9-13 he was raised in Athens and was the first to institute laws, a council, annually changing officials and a rei publicae forma ('state structure'). Accordingly, the monarch-led federal state may have been c…

Thasos

(1,097 words)

Author(s): Külzer, Andreas (Vienna)
This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Apollo | Macedonia, Macedones | Marble | Peloponnesian War | Pompeius | Education / Culture (Θάσος/ Thásos). [German version] I. Geography Island in the northern Aegean (Aegean Sea); 398 km2, up to 1203 m high, 10 km south-south-west of the mouth of the Nestus [1], separated from the Macedonian mainland by a c. 7 km wide strait, with no particularly deeply carved bays; predominantly marble with deposits of gneiss and mica schist, occasional granite (north-east, south-west); lush vegetation (includin…

Thaulon

(4 words)

see Bouphonia

Thaumaci

(168 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Θαυμακοί/ Thaumakoí). City in Achaea Phthiotis on the northern slopes of the Othrys mountains, on one of the most important routes to Thessaly. Remains of walls and ceramic finds suggest an origin in the 4th cent. BC; the first literary sources refer to events in the 3rd cent. BC, when T. was part of the Aetolian League. T. is mentioned several times in the military conflicts between the Romans, the Aetolians and Philippus [7] V shortly after 200 BC (Liv. 32,4,1-7; 32,4,13; 36,14,…

Thaumacia

(46 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θαυμακίη; Thaumakíē). One of the cities in Magnesia [1] which were represented at Troy with altogether seven ships under the leadership of Philoctetes, today not located (Hom. Il. 2,716-719; Str.  9,5,16; Plin. HN 4,32; cf. Steph. Byz., s. v. Θαυμακία). Antoni, Silke (Kiel)

Thaumas

(89 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θαύμας/ Thaúmas). Son of Pontus [1] and Gaia (or Tethys: Orph. Fr. 117), brother of Nereus, Phorcys [1], Ceto and Eurybia (Hes. Theog. 237 f.; Apollod. 1,10); with Electra [1] (Ozomene: Hyg. Fab. 14,18) father of the Harpies and Iris [1] (Hes. Theog. 265-267; 780; Verg. Aen. 9,5; Ov. Met 4,480 et passim; on the interpretation of the genealogy see Pl. Tht. 155d; Cic. Nat. D. 3,20,51). T. is also named as the father of the river Hydaspes (Nonn. Dion. 26,358-365) and of Arce (Ptol. Chennos 6,6, p. 39 Chatzis). Antoni, Silke (Kiel)

Thaumatopoios, Thaumatourgos

(5 words)

see Entertainers

Theadelpheia

(74 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[German version] (Θεαδέλφεια; Theadélpheia). Village in the Fayyum to the south of Lake Karun near modern (Baṭn) Ihrīt, founded under Ptolemaeus [3] II c. mid-3rd century BC and known from numerous papyrus finds. The chief deity was a crocodile god worshipped under the name Pnepheros. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) Bibliography 1 A. Calderini, Dizionario, vol. 2, 1977, 240-248; suppl. 1, 1988, 135 f.; suppl. 2, 1996, 66 2 E. Bernand, Recueil des inscriptions grecques du Fayoum, vol. 2, 1981, 1-86.

Theaedetus

(120 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Θεαίδητος; Theaídētos) from Rhodes, father of Astymedes [1. 1552], significant moderately Rome-friendly statesman [2. 185, 188]; in the peace treaty of Apamea [2] (Antiochus [5] III) with Cn. Manlius [I 24] Vulso in 189 BC he and Philophron had achieved i.a. the apportionment of Lycia (Lycii) to Rhodes (Pol. 22,5,2; [1. 85; 3. 182]). T. was about 80 years old when he travelled to Rome as naúarchos in the spring of 167 to effect a new alliance, but died there (Pol. 30,5,1-10; 30,21 f.; Liv. 45,25,7-10; [1. 139, 155-158; 4. 200-202]). Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) B…

Theaetetus

(1,081 words)

Author(s): Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
(Θεαίτητος; Theaítētos). [German version] [1] T. of Athens, mathematician, c. 400 BC Mathematician, a native of Athens, pupil of Theodorus [2] of Cyrene and later a member of Plato's Academy ( Akadḗmeia ). In Plato's [1] dialogue named after him, T. appears (together with the aged Theodorus [2]) as about fifteen years old in 399 BC; he was therefore born c. 414. Plato describes him as gentle, courageous and quick to apprehend. After he had been wounded in the battle of Corinth, T. contracted dysentery and died in 369. T. contributed substantially to the theory of irrational quantiti…

Theagenes

(873 words)

Author(s): Patzek, Barbara (Wiesbaden) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne) | Beck, Hans (Cologne) | Goulet-Cazé, Marie-Odile (Antony) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Et al.
(Θεαγένης/ Theagénēs). [German version] [1] Tyrant of Megara, 7th cent. BC Tyrant of Megara [2] in the last quarter of the 7th cent. BC; he probably descended from a noble family and maintained hospitality with aristocrats all over Greece. According to a later tradition, when he seized power, he is said to have won the people's confidence in his fight against the city's landowners (by slaughtering their flocks: Aristot. Pol. 5,1305a 21-26) and to have been granted a body guard by the assembly (Aristot. Rh.…

Theages

(136 words)

Author(s): Frede, Michael (Oxford)
[German version] (Θεάγης; Theágēs). Pseudepigraphical author of a work in the style of Pythagoras, Περὶ ἀρετῆς ( Perì aretês, 'On Virtue', two frr. in Stob. 3,76-81 and 81-84 Hense), 1st cent. BC/2nd cent. AD. A T. is mentioned in Iambl. VP 257 and 261 (based on Apollonius [14] of Tyana), not as a Pythagorean, however, but as one of the Thousand of Croton who took part in the democratic revolution against the Pythagoreans, although he was very close to the latter ( ibid. 255). He is also missing in Iamblichus' catalogue of Pythagoreans. The two surviving fragments are strongl…

Theangela

(390 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Education / Culture (Θεάγγελα/ Theángela). City in Caria (Cares), to the east of Halicarnassus, most eastern settlement of the Leleges; a precedessor settlement may have been Συάγγελα/ Syángela (S.), at the modern Alazeytin Kalesi to the west above Çiftlik [1. 112-116, 145-147; 2. 89-96], or on Mount Kaplan to the southwest of modern Etrim [3. 17 note 3, 224 note 33a]. In the 6th/5th cent. BC S. was in the hands of the Carian dynastic family of Pigres, who held a command…

Theano

(496 words)

Author(s): Waldner, Katharina (Berlin) | Frede, Michael (Oxford)
(Θεανώ/ Theanṓ). [German version] [1] Priestess of Athena in Troy Priestess of Athena in Troy, daughter of Thracian King Cisseus and of Teleclia, daughter of Ilus [1] (Hom. Il. 6,298-300; 11,223-224; schol. Eur. Hec. 3; Lucian. Imagines 19), since Euripides, sister of Hecabe as well (Eur. Hec. 3 and schol.; schol. A Hom. Il. 16,718; cf. Verg. Aen. 7,320). Mother of many children with Antenor [1] (the so-called Antenorids). As a priestess of Athena, she was of crucial importance for the Greeks in the battl…

Thearidas

(226 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
(Θεαρίδας/ Thearídās). [German version] [1] From Megale polis, father of Lycortas From Megale polis, father of Lycortas, who negotiated over his conquered home city with Cleomenes [6] III in 222 BC (Syll.3 626; Plut. Cleomenes 24) [1. 194; 199 f.]. Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) [German version] [2] From Megale Polis, son of Lycortas From Megale Polis, son of Lycortas, grandson of T. [1], administrator of Messene [2] c. 182 BC (IvOL 46,6). As the elder brother of the statesman and later historian Polybius [2], who was deported by the Romans, after 167 T. seem…

Theatre

(6,286 words)

Author(s): Blume, Horst-Dieter (Münster) | Isler, Hans-Peter (Zürich)
[German version] I. Concept Greek θέατρον ( théatron: 'Place where one looks'); Lat. theatrum. The Greek word can denote any arrangement of rows of seats or raised stands ( íkria) as a gathering place for festive, cultic or athletic events, as in Sparta for the Gymnopaidia festival in 491 BC (Hdt. 6,67,3), in the sanctuary of Olympia (Xen. Hell. 7,4,31) or the altar steps in the Amphiareion of Oropus (IG VII 4255,29 f.). The stands for the games in honour of Patroclus [1] depicted by the vase painter Sophilus ( c. 570 BC) may be seen as a theatre as well [1]. As a technical term in …

Theatre

(2,540 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) [German version] A.Late Antiquity/ Middle Ages (CT) There is, to be sure, evidence for the existence of sporadic performances of Greek tragedies up into 4th cent. AD and plays by Plautus and Terence continued to be performed as late as the 3rd/4th. cents., but on the whole, tragedies and comedies had largely disappeared from the theatre programme of the Roman Imperial Age. The stage of that age, however, was not devoid of dramatic, sub-literary genres [5]. They included mimes, pantomimes and the fabulae cantatae, i.e. tragic isolated scenes perfor…

Theatre Construction

(2,286 words)

Author(s): Beyer, Andreas
Beyer, Andreas [German version] A. Antiquity (CT) The ancient theatre reached its final form among the Greeks in the course of the 5th cent. BC. Its basic structure comprised three elements: the orchḗstra (a semicircle used for the performance of dances), the théatron (the audience space) and the skēnḗ (the stage structure and scenic prop). These three essential components are together regarded as inventions of the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods. The Roman theatre, which added the circus and the amphitheatre, also used the central elements of its Greek predecessor: the c…

Theatre tickets/tokens

(5 words)

see Tokens

Theatrical machines

(6 words)

see Ekkyklema; Mechane

Theatrum Balbi

(202 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Stone theatre on the Campus Martius in Rome (Rome III.), begun by L. Cornelius [I 7] Balbus on the occasion of his triumph over the Garamantes in 19 BC and dedicated in 13 BC (Suet. Aug. 29,5; Cass. Dio 54,25,2). Significant remains survive in modern Rome in the area around the Piazza Paganica, some of them unexcavated. The theatre, which was rebuilt several times and after the fire of AD 80 probably entirely reconstructed, held an audience of about 8000 and was therefore the smal…

Theatrum Marcelli

(181 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Theatre on the Campus Martius in Rome; probably already begun under Caesar and completed by Augustus in 17 BC for the Saecular Games ( Saeculum III), but dedicated only in 13 or 11 BC in the name of the nephew and first - early deceased - 'heir' of Augustus, M. Claudius [II 42] Marcellus. It was built on the place on which a large wooden temporary theatre was customarily constructed only for performances, and so takes its place in a tradition which was well-known in the Rome of the time. The complex, wh…

Theatrum Pompei(i)

(294 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The Theatre of Pompey, Rome's first stone theatre, interrupted a long sequence of predominantly wooden theatres which had previously been built temporarily for reasons of public safety in Rome and throughout Italy (Amphitheatre; Theatre II.); it was begun by the triumvir Pompeius [I 3] after his triumph (in 61 BC) and dedicated with lavish games in 55 BC, the second year of his consulship. The gigantic complex on the western part of the Field of Mars (Campus Martius) outside the c…

Thebais

(397 words)

Author(s): Latacz, Joachim (Basle)
[German version] (Θηβαΐς; Thēbaḯs). Title of numerous poetic accounts of the Theban cycle (Thebes [2] III.). Only the Latin T. by Statius [II 2] is entirely extant. We have fragments (1) of the 'Cyclic T.' (i.e. pertaining to the Epic cycle), (2) of the T. by Antimachus [3]. From the 'Cyclic T.' 8 testimonies and 10 fragments survive (in [1]), including 6 verbatim with a total of 20 hexameters. Still recognisable from the content are: (1) invocation of the Muse (Muse, invocation of the) with 'Argos' (not 'Thebes') given as the subject ma…

Theban cycle

(6 words)

see Thebes [2]

Thebe

(258 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster)
(Θήβη/ Thḗbē). [German version] [1] Daughter of Iason [2], 4th cent. BC Daughter of Iason [2] of Pherae; her name refers to Jason's former political soliciting of Boeotian support [1. 286] or her mother's origin in Thebes [2. 50]. In opposition to the tyrannical policies of her cousin and husband Alexander [15] of Pherae, in 364 BC T. encourages Pelopidas to intervene in Thessaly (Plut. Pelopidas 28 f.) and in 359 is supposed to have incited her brothers Tisiphonus and Lycophron [3] to assassinate Alexander…

Thebes

(6,143 words)

Author(s): Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Fell, Martin (Münster) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg) | Klodt, Claudia (Hamburg) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) | Et al.
[German version] [1] City in the 4th upper Egyptian nome This item can be found on the following maps: Egypt | Commerce | Egypt The Egyptian Thebes, city in the 4th upper Egyptian nome. Quack, Joachim (Berlin) [German version] I. Names Actually Ws.t ('the strong'), from which derived, no later than the 17th dynasty, a female personification Ws.t nḫt.tj ('victorious Thebes'). Beginning with the Middle Kingdom ( c. 1990-1630 BC), often called simply njw.t, 'the city (par excellence)' - from which also the Hebrew form no (Ez 30:14 f.; Jer 46:25; Nahum 3:8) and Assyrian Ne [10. 260] -- o…

Theches

(105 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Θήχης; Thḗchēs). Mountain ridge in the east of the northern Anatolian peripheral mountain chain (Xen. An. 4,7,21; Diod. Sic. 14,29,3: τὸ Χήνιον ὄρος/ tò Chḗnion óros). It was from here that the 'Ten Thousand' of Xenophon's Anábasis on their retreat after the battle of Cunaxa (in the autumn of 401 BC), saw the sea again for the first time (here: the Black Sea; Pontos Euxeinos). The T. can probably be located in the area of the Zigana Pass (Zigana Geçidi, 2025 m elevation). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) Bibliography T. B. Mitford, The Roman Frontier on the Upper Eup…

Thecla

(242 words)

Author(s): Albrecht, Ruth (Hamburg)
[German version] (Θέκλα/ Thékla, Latin Thecla). Despite the only relatively late literary evidence (Paul, Acts of; end of the 2nd cent. AD) for Paul's pupil T., she went on to become the most prominent female saint of Christian Late Antiquity. A sermon by Paul on abstinence motivated the young woman from Iconium in Asia Minor to abandon her plans to marry, in order to follow the Apostle instead. By miraculous divine interventions, T. survived two death sentences, but was nevertheless worshipped as a …

Theft

(11 words)

see Furtum; Hierosylia ; Klope ; Peculatus ; Robbery;

The Hague

(8 words)

see Netherlands and Belgium

Theia

(227 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Sylvia | Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] [1] Titan (Θεία/ Theíā, fem. of theîos 'divine', also called Erypháessa, 'the far-shining'). A Titan, daughter of Uranus and Gaea, mother by the Titan Hyperion of Helius, Eos and Selene, by Oceanus of the Cercopes (Hes. Theog. 135; 371; Orph. fr. 114; Catull. 66,44). Titans Zimmermann, Sylvia [German version] [2] Ostrogoth king, c. AD 550 (also known as Teia(s), Gr. Τείας /Teíās). Ostrogoth king in AD 552; sent by Totila to northern Italy in 552 to block Narses [4]'s way to Italy; when Narses bypassed him, however, he marched back to Totil…

Theias

(82 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θείας; Theías). Son of Belus and the Nymph Oreithyia (or her husband), unwittingly fathers Adonis with his daughter Smyrna (Myrrha). When he discovers the offence, he first tries to kill his daughter, who escapes by transforming herself into the tree of the same name, then kills himself in shame (Antoninus Liberalis 34; Apollod. 3,183 f. after Panyassis; Tzetz. Lycoph. 829). Other sources name Cinyras as Smyrna's father (Ov. Met. 10,298-518; Hyg. Fab. 58; Tzetz.  Lycoph. 831). Antoni, Silke (Kiel)

Theios

(108 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θεῖος; Theîos). The term Theíōi is found, exclusively in the dative, in several inscriptions, e.g. in a calendar of sacrifices from the period of Hadrian. It is controversial (discussion of the sources: [1]) whether it refers to an independent deity (e.g. as a masculine counterpart to Theia [1]) or is an orthographical variant of the dative of theós ('god') or tò theîon ('the divine', 'the deity'). When Theíōi is linked by kaí ('and') with the name of another deity it is possible to interpret it as a further aspect (or epithet) of that deity. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliograph…

Theisoa

(183 words)

Author(s): Tausend, Sabine
(Θεισόα/ Theisóa). [German version] [1] City in Arcadia City in Arcadia (Arcadians; Paus. 8,27,7: 'near Orchomenus'), at modern Karkalou Mill (1050 m elevation). Remains survive of the acropolis fortifications, the city wall, an Hellenistic sanctuary (IG V 2, 511) and houses. Initially part of Orchomenus [3], in 368 BC T. was incorporated into Megale polis. Made autonomous again by Philopoemen (SEG 14, 455), T. was a member of the Achaean League (cf. Achaeans, Achaea [1]) and minted its own coins. Tausend, Sabine Bibliography S. Dusanic, Notes epigraphiques sur l'histoire ar…

Theke

(104 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (θήκη; thḗkē) is a term for any kind of container. In particular, from the 5th/4th cent. BC onwards it is used in texts and inscriptions for niche-shaped burial places, whether for burials in funerary buildings (Melos, 4th cent. BC) and vaults (Hdt. 1,67,3; 2,148,5), or for storing cinerary urns (Alexandria), but not sarkophagoi (Sarcophagus). Latin theca , in contrast, refers exclusively to holders for objects, primarily writing implements. Loculi Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography E. Saglio, s. v. loculus, DS 3.2, 1904, 1292-1295  A. Hug, s. v. T., RE …

Thela

(61 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Son of Odoacer; elevated by his father to Caesar in Italy ( c. 489-493 AD); from 493 onwards a hostage of Theoderic [3] the Great, after the death of Odoacer (in 493) banished to Gaul and on attempting to return murdered by Theoderic. (Iohannes Antiochenus fr. 241a, FHG 5, 29; Anon. Vales. 11,54). PLRE 2,1064. Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)

Thelepte

(129 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae City in Africa Byzacena (Africa [3]); important road hub, 77 km to the north-northwest of Capsa, modern Medinet el-Kdima, with significant ancient remains. A municipium possibly from the time of Vespasianus, from the time of Traianus [1] a colonia. In 354 AD the dux of Africa Byzacena was resident there (Cod. Iust. 1,27,2,1; cf. It. Ant. 77,4; Tab. Peut. 4,5; Procop. Aed. 6,6,18). Inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 176-183; 211; 216; 2094; 2565 b; CIL VIII 2, 10032-10037; Suppl. 1, 11263-11273; 4, 23181-23186; [1. 56]. Huß, We…

Thelphusa

(161 words)

Author(s): Tausend, Sabine
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Achaeans, Achaea | Arcadians, Arcadia (Θέλφουσα/ Thélphousa). City in Arcadia (Arcadians) on the left bank of the Ladon [2] at modern T. on the road from Psophis to Heraea (Paus. 8,25,1-11; Hierocles Synekdemos 647,6). Remains survive of the city wall and the agora (colonnade, temple). T. was autonomous in the Archaic and Classical periods, and c. 235 BC a member of the Achaean League (Achaeans; Pol. 2,54,12). Stratus, the fortress in the west of the city, was occupied in the Social War [2] by the …

Themacus

(75 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Attica (Θημακός; Thēmakós). Attic mesogeia (?) deme, Erechtheis phyle, from 224/3 BC Ptolemaïs, one bouleutḗs; location unknown. IG II2 1212 (finding site: in vico Kara, modern Ilioupoli) is probably not a decree from T., cf. [1]. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Whitehead, 392 No. 135. Traill, Attica 15, 38, 62, 69, 75, 112 No. 134, Tab. 1, 13  J. S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 126.

Themata, naval

(114 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] Themes of the Byzantine Empire, established from the early 8th cent. AD for the construction and maintenance of a fleet. The most significant of them comprised the whole Mediterranean coast of Asia Minor from Miletus to Cilicia. The capital was probably Attaleia [1], but the crews were predominantly from the mountainous hinterland in the western part of the theme, as is shown by the name 'Theme of the Cibyrrhaeoti', which can be traced to the city of Cibyra about 80 km from the sea in the Carian-Lycian border region. Theme Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) Bibliography 1 H. Ahrwe…

Thematics: Studies in Subject-Matter and Motifs

(2,311 words)

Author(s): Arweiler, Alexander
Arweiler, Alexander [German version] A. General (CT) Thematics investigates literary works in which traditional subjects or motifs are taken up and re-elaborated with a new focus on each occasion (on terminology, cf. [5; 21. 26; 36. 201]). Subjects may be conceived of as traditional constellations of figures and plot (for instance, ancient myths) which, on the one hand, are reduced into motifs as the smallest units important for the plot, and on the other are analysed as the themes each one of them imp…

Thematic vowel

(198 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Vocalic element used (alone or in combination with preceding sounds) to form word stems (Greek θέμα/ théma). In Indo-European languages, TVs typically appear as e and o; they are characteristic of both nominal stems (e.g. the accusative singular Latin agrum, Greek ἀγρόν/ agrón, Sanskrit ájram, from the underlying stem * h2aǵ-r=o- ‘field’, known as the o-declension) and verbal stems (e.g. the present stem * h2aǵ-e/o- underlying Latin agite/agunt, Greek ἄγετε/ἄγουσι(ν) ( ágete/ ágousi(n)), Sanskrit ajata/ajanti ‘drive (imperative plural)’/‘they drive’). O…

Thematology

(5 words)

see Thematology

Theme

(472 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] (θέμα /théma, pl. thémata; literally: 'area of deployment' [6]). Byzantine administrative districts that replaced the Roman provincial divisions beginning in the 7th cent. AD: After the loss of Egypt and the Middle East (mid 7th cent. AD), the Roman troops were withdrawn to Asia Minor only to be re-deployed there in the four themes of Anatolia, Armenia, Thracia and Opsikion, each under the command of a strategos (Byzantium II. D. incl. map). By the mid 8th cent., the authority of the provincial administration had been complet…

Themis

(512 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Θέμις/ Thémis, literally 'law, sacred ordinance'). Greek goddess and divine personification of sacred ancient law (cf., in contrast, Dike [1]). She stands for the traditional order of things, be it based on human convention (as in Hom. Od. 14,56 about the correct treatment of strangers) or on nature itself (as in Hom. Od. 9,130 about the 'nature of woman'). She plays an important role in the orderly call for assemblies (cf. Hom. Il. 20,4 f. etc.). Originally, themis probably referred to 'what was laid down', in Mycenaean perhaps the word for 'debt' [1. 25 f., 106, 121]. A…

Themiscyra

(87 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Θεμίσκυρα/ Themískyra). Highly fertile coastal region (Hecat. FGrH 1 F 7a; Apollod. 2,101; Plin. HN 6,9; Just. Epit. 2,4,1) or Greek city (at modern Terme, Peripl. m. Eux. 29; Ps.-Scyl. 89; possibly destroyed in the third of the Mithridatic Wars since for later times there is no information) in the north of the Paryadres mountains on the southern shore of the Black Sea (Pontos Euxeinos) on the lower River Thermodon [2], where in Greek myth the Amazons lived (cf. Aesch. PV 724 f.; Hdt. 4,110). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)

Themison

(339 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne) | Nutton, Vivian (London)
(Θεμίσων; Themísōn). [German version] [1] Tyrant from Eretria [1], 4th cent. BC Tyrant of Eretria [1], who occupied Oropus in 366 BC with some of the town’s exiles. The people controlling the operation were based in Thebes, and assistance also came from there in order to fend off an Athenian counter-attack. After an arbitration tribunal the pólis went to the Thebans, who maintained T.’s regime (Diod. Sic. 15,76,1; Dem. Or. 18,99; Xen. Hell. 7,4,1). Beck, Hans (Cologne) Bibliography J. Buckler, The Theban Hegemony, 1980, 193 f. [German version] [2] Th. from Laodicea Greek doctor, …

Themisonium

(124 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Education / Culture (Θεμισώνιον/ Themisṓnion). City in southwestern Phrygia (Str. 12,8,13; Paus. 10,32,4; Ptol. 5,2,26; Hierocles, Synekdemos 666,3), presumably to the north of Acıpayam at modern Dodurga in the valley of the Kazanes (coins: BMC Phrygia 418 f.); this river can probably be identified as the Casus (modern river Karayük), which Manlius [I 24] crossed on his march from Tabae to Cibyra in 189 BC (cf. Liv. 38,14,1). T. was named after Themison, a fri…

Themista

(100 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Θεμίστα; Themísta). One of the women philosophers of the Epicurean School; at the beginning of the 4th cent. BC the wife of Leonteus [2] (Diog. Laert. 10,5,25); they had a son called Epicurus (Diog. Laert. 10,26). Cicero praises T.'s 'wisdom' ( sapientia) and names her as the author of numerous writings ( tanta volumina, Cic. Pis. 63). Epicurus addressed a number of letters (Excerpt: Diog. Laert. 10,5 = fr. 125 Usener) and a work Neocles to T. (Νεοκλῆς πρὸς Θεμίστα; Diog. Laert. 10,28) to her. Nothing of her work survives. Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography M. Erler, i…

Themistius

(698 words)

Author(s): R.TO.
(Θεμίστιος; Themístios). Commentator on Aristotle (Aristotle, commentators on) and politician ( c. AD 317 - c. 385). [German version] I. Life Commentator on Aristotle and politician, c. AD 317-385 T. was probably born in Paphlagonia, and received his training in rhetoric and philosophy from his father Eugenius, himself a philosopher (Them. Or. 20). Between c. AD 345 and 355, he led his own school of philosophy at Constantinople, preparing paraphrases (some with detailed exegesis) of Aristotelian writings in conjunction with his teaching (cf. Aristo…

Themisto

(137 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
(Θεμιστώ; Themistṓ). [German version] [1] Daughter of the Lapith Hypseus Daughter of the Lapith Hypseus, third wife of Athamas (Herodoros 31 F 38 FGrH; Apollod. 1,84; Ath. 13,560d; Nonn. Dion. 9,305-307; Tzetz. Lykophr. 22), who is the father of her several children. Her predecessors were Nephele [1] and Ino. When the latter returns, T., tries to kill her children (Hyg. Fab. 4,239, otherwise in Fab. 1). By means of a change of clothing Ino causes T. to kill her own children, whereupon T. takes her own life. Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [2] Ancestor of the Arcadians Daught…

Themistocles

(904 words)

Author(s): Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough)
[German version] (Θεμιστοκλῆς). Athenian, of the Phrearrhii deme in the Leontis phyle, and of the family of the Lycomidae, b. c. 525 BC, the son of Neocles [1] (Hdt. 7,143 et alibi; Nep. T. 1,1; Plut. T. 1,1 and 4; Aristid. 5,4) and a perhaps non-Athenian mother (cf. Nep. T. 1,1; Plut. T. 1,2); an important politician at the time of the Persian Wars [1]. Mnesiphilus is said to have been the teacher of T., who was reputed to have been headstrong (cf. Thuc. 1,138,3; Nep. T. 1,2; Plut. T. 2) and to set little store by artistic education (Ion …

Themistogenes

(202 words)

Author(s): Schütrumpf, Eckart E. (Boulder, CO)
[German version] (Θεμιστογένης/ Themistogénēs) of Syracuse. According to Xen. Hell. 3,1,2 the author of a work on the campaign of Cyrus [3], his death in battle at Cunaxa in 401 BC and the successful return of the Greek troops. The existence of the work, which has sometimes been ascribed to a T. (cf. [1. vol. 2, 199911]), is nevertheless doubtful, since Xenophon described this very event (Xen. An. 1-4) and would have been able to cite himself. It is therefore more likely to see, as does [2. 1644-1646], T. (= 'descendant of Themis') as a pseudonym, chosen by Xenophon to make his Anábasis more …

Themistus

(98 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
[German version] (Θέμιστος; Thémistos). Syracusan, married to Harmonia, the daughter of Gelon [2] II and granddaughter of Hieron [2] II (Liv. 24,24,2 and 6; 25,7 and 10). He was presumably a member of the regency council established by Hieron for his underage grandson Hieronymus [3] and after Hieronymus was killed took part in a coup planned by Adranodorus  (Liv. 24,24,2; 24,25). At the command of the strategoi, who had been informed of the plot, however, he was executed - as was Adranodorus - in 214 BC (Liv. 24,24,4). Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography H. Berve, Hieron II., 1959, 86…

Thena

(109 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Punic Tynt?; Θένα/ Théna, Latin Thena, Thenae). Originally probably a Punic city (cf. CIS I 3, 4911 and archaeological finds) in Byzacena (Africa [3];  Str. 17,3,12; 17,3,16; Plin.  HN 5,25), 12 km to the south of Taparura (modern Sfax); end of the Fossa [7] Regia built in 146 BC by Cornelius [I 70] Scipio on the Gulf of Gabes (Syrtis;  cf. [1. 435 note 80]); modern Thyna. The port, probably a colonia from the time of Hadrianus, acquired a certain amount of significance from the 2nd cent. AD onwards. From 255 recorded as a bishopric. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography 1 Hus…

Thenephmus

(32 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (Θένεφμος; Thénephmos). Egyptian, recorded as early as 247/6 BC as owner of a dōreá ('estate awarded by the king') of 10,000 árourai. PP IV 10083. Ameling, Walter (Jena)

Theocles

(88 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Θεοκλῆς; Theoklês). Son of Hegylus, sculptor from Sparta. T. was a pupil of Dipoenus and Scyllis and thus was active in the mid-6th cent. BC. A representation in cedar wood of 'Heracles with the Hesperids' in the treasury of Epidamnus in Olympia were by him and his son; at the time of Pausanias the Hesperids were in the Temple of Hera (Paus. 6,19,8). Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Overbeck, No. 328 f.  P. Moreno, s. v. T., EAA 7, 1966, 816  H. Marwitz, Hegylos?, in: AA 1969, 106 f.  Fuchs/Floren, 215.

Theoclymenus

(89 words)

Author(s): Johannsen, Nina (Kiel)
[German version] (Θεοκλύμενος; Theoklýmenos). Mythical seer from Argos, son of Polypheides and hence descendant of Melampus [1] (Hom. Od. 15,223-256). In Pylus [1] T., a fugitive for manslaughter, encounters Telemachus. The latter takes the supplicant with him to Ithaca, where initially he leaves him in the care of Piraeus (ibid. 15,256-286; 15,508-546). Later brought to the palace, T. tells Penelope that Odysseus is in the country again (ibid. 17,71-165), and foretells an imminent death for her suitors but is mocked as mad (ibid. 20,350-383). Johannsen, Nina (Kiel)

Theocosmus

(90 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (Θεόκοσμος; Theókosmos). Sculptor from Megara in the late 5th cent. BC, father of Callicles [2]. With the help of Pheidias he created a gold-ivory cult image of Zeus (Gold-ivory technique) in Megara, which remained unfinished after 431 BC because of the Peloponnesian War. On the victory monument of Lysander [1] in Delphi (in 405 BC) T. made the statue of Hermon [3]. Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography Overbeck, Nr. 855; 979; 1035  Lippold, 203 f.  P. Moreno, s. v. T., EAA 7, 1966, 816  A. Jacquemin, Offrandes monumentales à Delphes, 1999, Nr. 322.

Theocrines

(60 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne)
[German version] (Θεοκρίνης; Theokrínēs). Athenian from the Hybadae deme (IG II/III2 2,2, 2409, 44 f.), a notorious sykophántēs (cf. Dem. Or. 18,313), who made a living from threats of court action and extortion. A forensic speech by Epichares from 342 BC ([Dem.] Or. 58) is directed against him. Beck, Hans (Cologne) Bibliography Traill, PAA, 508320  Schäfer, vol. 4 (appendices), 266-280.

Theocritus

(2,279 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Hunter, Richard (Cambridge) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
(Θεόκριτος/ Theókritos). [German version] [1] Greek sophist and politician, 4th cent. BC T. of Chios, Greek sophist and politician, born before 365 BC, a pupil of the Isocratean (Isocrates) Metrodorus (Str. 14,645; Ps.-Plut. Mor. 11ab; Ath. 12,540 A; Suda s. v. Th.). T. was a convinced opponent of the Macedonian kings and their followers. He directed fierce attacks against Aristoteles [6] (Plut. Mor. 603c; Diog. Laert. 5,11) and Anaximenes [2] of Lampsacus (Hermippus in Ath. 1,21c). Following the conquest o…

Theodahatus (Theodahat)

(221 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] ( Theodahadus; Θευδάτος/ Theudátos). AD 534-536 king of the Ostrogoths in Italy, from the Amali family, son of Amalafrida, nephew of Theoderic the Great (Theodericus (Theoderic) [3]); he owned large estates in Tuscia, often illegally acquired (Proc. BG 1,3,2; cf. e.g. Cassiod. Var. 4,39). After the death of Athalaric, T., who until then had pursued scholarly studies (Proc. BG 1,3,1), was appointed king by Amalasuntha, with power supposed in fact to remain with the latter (Proc. BG 1,…

Theodamas

(58 words)

Author(s): Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki)
[German version] Probably an Indo-Greek king or prince, recorded only in one Kharoṣṭī inscription (known as the Bajaur Seal) as Middle Indian Theudama. It is by no means certain that the reading of the short inscription as "of the king Theodamas" is correct, but the name is certain. Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) Bibliography Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum 2.1, Nr. 3

Theodamas

(290 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
[German version] (Θειοδάμας/ Theiodámas; Lat. Theodamas, Thiodamas). King of the Dryopes, who were driven from their homeland by Heracles [1]; father of Hylas. A connexion is made in Hellenistic literature between T. and the resettlement of the brigand Dryopes in the Peloponnese (Bacchyl. Paean 4; Hdt. 8,43; 8,47; Diod. Sic. 4,37) - perhaps following Hesiod's Kḗykos gámos ('the wedding of Ceyx', Hes. fr. 263-269; [1]): in Apollonius Rhodius (1,1211-1219) as a pretext for war Heracles provokes a conflict over the ploughing bull of T., a poor farmer, w…

Theodas

(102 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Θεοδᾶς; Theodâs) from Laodicea. Greek physician c. 125 AD; he and Menodotus [2] were pupils of the sceptic Antiochus [20]; he was a leading representative of the School of the Empiricists. He wrote (1.) Chief points (Κεφάλαια), which Galenus and a later (otherwise unknown) Theodosius commented on; (2.) On the parts of medicine (Περὶ τῶν τῆς ἰατρικῆς μερῶν), in which he emphasised the significance of autopsy, historíē ('research') and analogy; (3.) an Introduction to medicine (Εἰσαγώγη). His works were  still being copied in the 3rd cent. in Egypt. Only…

Theodebaldus (Theodebald)

(117 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] ( Theodebaldus; Θευδίβαλδος/ Theudíbaldos). Frankish king 547-555 AD, son of Theodebert, still a child at the beginning of his reign. Courted by Iustinianus [1] in 551 for an alliance against Totila (Proc. BG 4,24,11-30), T. refused both this and a request for help from the Ostrogoths in 552 (Proc. BG 4,34,17 f.; for the relationship with Byzantium cf. MGH Epp. 3,131 f., 547 AD). Allegedly against T.'s will, however, Leuthari and Butilinus supported the Goths in Italy in 553/4, but w…

Theodebertus (Theodebert)

(133 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] ( Theodebertus; Θευδίβερτος/ Theudíbertos). Frankish king 533-547 AD (534-548?,  cf. [1. 7]), son of Theoderic (Theodericus (Theoderic)  [4]) (Greg. Tur. Franc. 3,20-36). Together with his uncles, in 534 he conquered Burgundy, from 539 exploited fighting between Byzantium and the Goths  for attacks in Italy (Procop. Goth. 2,25), occupied parts of northern Italy and conducted a self-confident (cf. MGH Epp. 3,132 f. to Iustinianus [1]) double-dealing between the Goths and Byzantium. He…

Theodectes

(976 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald)
[German version] (Θεοδέκτης/ Theodéktēs). Rhetor and tragedian of the 4th cent. BC, active in Athens, extant only in fragments, b. in Phaselis (Lycia), son of an Aristander. Only the Suda (s. v. Θ.) mentions a like-named son of T., who was also active in literature (historiographic and ethnographic works, text for rhetorical instruction in 7 books, encomium of Alexander [6]); no other source differentiates between the two T., so that in some cases it is difficult to assign a work. This information …

Theodericus (Theoderic)

(1,575 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
( Theodericus; Θευδέριχος; Theudérichos). [German version] [1] T. I King of the Visigoths, AD 418-451, successor to Vallia, probably the son-in-law of Alaricus [2] [1. 180]. Despite the settlement of the Visigoths in Gaul in 418, he besieged Arelate (Arles) in 425, then renewed the foedus with Rome ( foederati ), but again fought against Aetius [2] in 436. In 438, the Goths were defeated; in 439, there was another treaty with Rome after renewed Gothic successes. In 450, Attila attempted in vain to win over T.; T. was kill…

Theodicy

(498 words)

Author(s): Ebert, Theodor (Erlangen/Nürnberg)
[German version] A. Definition The term theodicy refers to the attempt at reconciling the evils of the world, in particular the suffering of innocent beings and the good fortune of evil-doers with the notion of an all-powerful God who is as good as He is just. The modern term 'theodicy' (Leibniz) has no equivalent in Greek although it was derived from Greek words. Ebert, Theodor (Erlangen/Nürnberg) [German version] B. Theodicy within the history of philosophy and theology The problem for which theodicy is trying to supply an answer is presented, for instance, in poetic f…

Theodora

(850 words)

Author(s): Bleckmann, Bruno (Strasbourg) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
(Θεοδώρα; Theodṓra). [German version] [1] Roman empress, about AD 300 Roman empress; stepdaughter (Aur. Vict. Caes. 39,25; Eutr. 9,22,1) or daughter (Anon. Vales. 1,1; Philostorgius 2,16) of Maximianus [1]. Contrary to the assertions of later sources, she was already married to Constantius [1] even before he was elevated to the rank of Caesar in AD 293  ( tetrárchēs IV.), and probably when he was praefectus praetorio to Maximianus (unclear Paneg. 2,11,4). The six children of their marriage represent the younger branch of the Constantinian imperial fam…

Theodore Abū Qurra

(272 words)

Author(s): Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
[German version] (died c. 830), from Edessa [2]. T. lived as a monk in the monastery of Mār Sābā at Jerusalem, and after 780 and after 799 became the Melchite (Melchites) bishop of Ḥarrān (the reasons for his temporarily removal from office are unclear). His Syriac writings [1.212] do not survive. He is the first clearly apprehensible Christian theologian to also write in Arabic: in more than 20 (some still unpublished) treatises (for the editions see [5.238f.]; Germ. transl. [1; 2]) he deals, in d…
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