Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Theodoretus

(442 words)

Author(s): Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Baumbach, Manuel (Zürich)
(Θεοδώρητος; Theodṓrētos). [German version] [1] Bishop of Cyrrhus, 1st half of the 5th cent. Bishop of Cyrrhus (born in c. 393, bishop in 423, died in c. 466). T. received a solid classical education in the monastic milieu of Antioch [1]. A devoted pastor in his diocese, he fought against heretics (Heresy) and worked towards improving living conditions. In the Christological conflict between Cyrillus [2] of Alexandria and Nestorius he joined the latter without reservations. He was dismissed by the Synod of Ephesus in 449…

Theodoridas

(116 words)

Author(s): Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
[German version] (Θεοδωρίδας; Theodōrídas). Greek poet from Syracuse (second half of the 3rd cent. BC; on his origin  cf. Ath. 15,599e), whose varied works are all lost (cf. [1]) with the exception of 19 elegant epigrams (dedications, funerary poetry and two epideictic poems; the attribution by Anth. Pal. 7,282 is uncertain) in Meleager's [8] 'Garland' (4,1,53 f.). In a fictional funerary inscription (Anth. Pal. 13,21) T. criticises Mnasalces; he also seems to attack Euphorion [3] in an epitaph (7,406) which he presumably wrote when Euphorion was still alive. Albiani, Maria Grazia…

Theodorides

(35 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)
[German version] (Θεοδωρίδης; TheodōrÍdēs). Greek tragedian (TrGF I 78 A), took second place at the Athenian Lenaea in 363 BC with a Medea and a Phaethon (DID A 2b, 94). Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg)

Theodoropolis

(165 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
(Θεοδωρόπολις/  Theodōrópolis, also Θεοδωρούπολις/ Theodōroúpolis). Name of several towns and forts in the northern Balkan peninsula founded by Iustinianus [1] I and named after his wife Theodora [2], which have not all been located. [German version] [1] City in Moesia Secunda City in Moesia Secunda (Moesi, with map) on the Danube (Ister [1]), between Securisca (modern Cherkovitsa) and Iatrus (modern Krivina; Proc. Aed. 4,7,5). von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) [German version] [2] Fort in Dacia Ripiensis Fort in Dacia Ripiensis (Proc. Aed. 4,6,18) on the right b…

Theodorus

(7,286 words)

Author(s): Knell, Heiner (Darmstadt) | Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Baumhauer, Otto A. (Bremen) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Blume, Horst-Dieter (Münster) | Et al.
[German version] I Greek (Θεόδωρος; Theódōros). [German version] [I 1] Of Samos, Greek architect, bronze sculptor and inventor, Archaic period Multitalented Greek inventor, architect, bronze sculptor and metal worker ( toreutḗs; Toreutics) of the Archaic period from Samos (for the occupational image cf. architect). His father was Telecles (Hdt. 3,41; Paus. 8,14,8; 10,38,6) or according to other sources (Diog. Laert. 2,103; Diod. Sic. 1,98) Rhoecus [3]; his name is so frequently mentioned in conjunction with the latter that …

Theodosia

(169 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pontos Euxeinos | Colonization | Patricius | Patricius (Θεοδοσία/ Theodosía; modern Feodosiya). City on the northern coast of the Black Sea (Pontos Euxeinos I) in a fertile plain, with an excellent harbour which could contain 100 ships (Str. 7,4,4), founded c. 700 BC by colonists from Miletos [2]. T. minted coins autonomously c. 500 BC. Conquered in the first half of the 4th cent. BC by Leucon [3] I, T. was subsequently the westernmost polis of the Regnum Bosporanum (Arr. Peripl. p. eux. 30). The city was an import…

Theodosiopolis

(286 words)

Author(s): Röllig, Wolfgang (Tübingen) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
(Θεοδοσιόπολις/ Theodosiópolis, Θεοδοσιούπολις/ Theodosioúpolis). [German version] [1] Modern Ras al-Ain, Syria T. in Osroene (in northern Mesopotamia), according to Procop. BP 2,19,29 (cf. Aed. 2,2,16) on the Ḫabur about 40 miles (= 60 km) from Dara, the village of Resaeina (= Ras al-Ain at the source of the Ḫabur) elevated c. AD 383 by Theodosius [2] I to a city (Malalas 13,40 p. 345 Dindorf). Iustinianus [1] I further increased the fortification of T., which was situated at the end of the Byzantine Limes (VI. C.), with forts (Procop. A…

Theodosius

(3,100 words)

Author(s): Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Frede, Michael (Oxford) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne) | Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) | Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main) | Et al.
[German version] I Greek (Θεοδόσιος/ Theodósios). [German version] [I 1] Greek mathematician and astronomer, 2nd/1st cent. BC Greek mathematician and astronomer. Folkerts, Menso (Munich) [German version] I. Life and works According to Str. 12,4,9, T. was one of the most important men in Bithynia; the birthplace Tripoli given in the Suda (s. v. Θ.) may relate to another T. As Strabo also names T.’ sons as important mathematicians, T. must belong in the 2nd half of the 2nd cent. BC, or, at the latest, the 1st half of the 1st. …

Theodotion

(133 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Θεωδοτίων/ Theodotíōn; according to Epiphanius, De mensuris et ponderibus 17; 2nd cent. AD), in the view of the ancient Church a proselyte from Ephesus (Iren. Adversus haereses 3,21). T. did not produce (in contrast to Aquila [3] and Symmachus [2]) a new Greek translation of the Old Testament, rather he revised a Greek translation in accordance with the Hebrew text. Whether his model was identical with the Septuaginta is debatable, since there are also 'Theodotionic' readings in texts earlier than T. [1] identified T. with the author of the k aige- or Palestinian rece…

Theodotus

(1,303 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Et al.
(Θεόδοτος; Theódotos). [German version] [1] Greek architect, c.370 BC Mentioned several times in the construction records for the temple of Asclepius at Epidaurus as its architect; his origins are as unknown as his subsequent whereabouts. T.’ salary during the project amounted to 365 drachmae per year, together with further payments of unknown object. It is uncertain whether he is the same person as the sculptor T. named in IG IV2 102 (B 1 line 97) as having, for 2,340 drachmae, fashioned the acroteria for the pediment; it is possible that the name T. has been in…

Theogenes

(485 words)

Author(s): Decker, Wolfgang (Cologne) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(Θεογένης/ Theogénēs). [German version] [1] Athlete from Thasos, 5th cent. BC Famous fighter from the island of Thasos, Olympic champion in 480 BC (against Euthymus of Locri [1. nos. 191; 214; 222]) in fist-fighting [1. no. 201] and in 476 BC in pankration [1. no. 215]. This constellation of victories was first documented for T. on an inscription in Delphi [2. no. 37] dating from the 2nd cent. BC, which attests that the athlete was adored by his home polis for as long as four generations after his death. Pausanias tells of three victories in Delphi, ten in the Isthmia a…

Theognetus

(88 words)

Author(s): Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
[German version] (Θεόγνητος; Theógnētos). Comic poet of the 3rd cent. BC (cf. Pantaleon mentioned in fr. 2). Two fragments and three titles survive: Κένταυρος ('The centaur'), Φιλοδέσποτος ('The one who loves his master', probably referring to a slave [2. 28710]) and Φάσμα ἢ Φιλάργυρος ('The ghost or The miser'); in the surviving fr. 1 of this play there is mockery of somebody who has lost his mind in the pursuit of Stoic philosophy. Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) Bibliography 1 PCG VII, 1989, 696-698 2 H.-G. Nesselrath, Die att. Mittlere Komödie, 1990.

Theognis

(1,349 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg)
(Θέογνις/ Théognis). [German version] [1] Elegiac poet, 6th cent. BC Elegiac poet, 6th cent. BC Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) [German version] I. Life and textual history T. was born in Megara [2] in Greece (Didymus in schol. Plat. leg. 630a), hardly Megara [3] in Sicily (Suda Θ 136 and probably Plat. l.c.,), ca. 544-1 BC (Suda l.c.; acc. to [17] 65-71 ca. 630-600). Plat. l.c. (citing El. 77-8) and Isoc. Or. 3,42-3 first name T. as a good adviser, and according to Stob. 4,29,53 Xen. wrote On Theognis and cited El. 22-3 and 183-190. T.'s poems were probably sung at 5th and 4th cent. B…

Theognostus

(103 words)

Author(s): Damschen, Gregor (Halle/Saale)
[German version] (Θεόγνωστος; Theógnōstos). Byzantine grammarian, 9th cent. AD, author of a (lost) work on Euphemius' rebellion in Sicily in 826-827 (cf. Theophanes Continuatus, Chronographia p. 82 Bekker) and an 'Orthography' (Περὶ ὀρθογραφίας/ Perì orthographías; Cod. Baroccianus 50, 10th cent.) containing 1003 rules. Several words, not recorded in earlier works and taken over into later etymologica, constitute the true value of this two-part instructional text, whose main sources are a glossary of Cyrillus [6] and (according to T.' letter of dedication) Herodianus [1]. Dams…

Theogony

(588 words)

Author(s): Arrighetti, Graziano (Pisa)
[German version] (Θεογονία; theogonía). The 'origin of the Greek gods' as well as the origin of the parts of the world and moral/abstract principles whose personifications were gods (Cosmogony). All ancient theogonic systems are based on genealogical connections; this is evident as early as Homer's epics. Since the concept of creation out of nothing was unknown, there were differing opinions about the origin of all things: in the Iliad (Hom. Il. 14,200-204), Oceanus and Tethys are regarded as the progenitors of all of the g…

Theoi Megaloi, Theai Megalai

(494 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster)
(θεοὶ μεγάλοι/ theoì megáloi, θεαὶ μεγάλαι/ theaì megálai, Latin di magni). [German version] I. General Term for a variety of deities or groups of gods in the Greek world. A distinction is made between deities or groups of gods for whom the adjective 'great' was used as an honorary epithet (e.g. Megálē Týchē, Theòs hýpsistos mégas theós) and those whose cultic nomen proprium was 'Great God' or 'Great Gods', such as the TM in Caria (SEG 11,984; 2nd cent. AD). Inscriptions record a broad range of use between these two poles. Often the TM are deities or groups…

Theoi pantes

(297 words)

Author(s): Elm, Dorothee
[German version] (θεοὶ πάντες/ theoì pántes, 'all the gods'). The gods in their entirety. They are called upon in vow formulas, oaths and prayers, and named in curses, short invocations or requests. Benedictions are offered to TP and altars are dedicated to them. The pantheon [2] is the sacred place for the worship of their cult. The Greek composite personal names Pánthe(i)os, Pánthe(i)a, Panthýs are derived from TP. Benedictions for 'the all-divine', to pántheion, are connected with their cult ([1; 3. 697-703] with examples). Besides TP , the gods in their entirety are described as pánte…

Theoi patrioi

(364 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (θεοὶ πάτριοι/πατρῷοι; theoì pátrioi/ patrôioi; πατρικοί/ patrikoí: P CZ 3, 59421,2; 3rd cent. BC; [8.883]), 'fatherly' (inherited, native, traditional) deities; in multilingual inscriptions Lat. patrii di (e.g. inscriptions by Cornelius Gallus in: OGIS II 654,9; 29 BC; Philae). The word patrôios in particular appears in connection with theonyms, above all for Apollo [2; 9] and Zeus. In many cases, the semantic differentiations made between pátrios, patrôios, patrikós by ancient lexicographers (supporting evidence: ThGL VI 612) do not correspon…

Theologia tripertita

(7 words)

see Theology; Varro [2]

Theologos

(259 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Klaus (Jena)
[German version] (θεολόγος/ theológos, Latin theologus). Author of writings on the nature, activity and genealogy of gods. The earliest examples were considered to be Orpheus, Musaeus [1], Homer and Hesiod (Aristot. Metaph. 2,4,1000a). From Aristotle (Metaph. 13,4,1091a) through Cicero (Nat. D. 3,54) and Plutarch [2] (De Is. et Os. 25,360d) to Eusebius (Praep. ev. 5,14,3), the term describes philosophers who are engaged in studying the divine ( theología or theologikḗ). No later than the time of Plutarch (De def. or. 15,417f.) there was an official position in Delphi for a theologos,…
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