Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Thamyris

(160 words)

Author(s): Nünlist, René (Basle)
[German version] (Θάμυρις/ Thámyris, also Θαμύρας/ Thamýras). Mythical singer from Thrace (cf. Orpheus), who in human overestimation of himself challenges the Muses to compete with him and, naturally, loses (for the motif, cf. Marsyas [1], Niobe, Capaneus). As a punishment they take his gift of song away (again) and maim him (Hom. Il. 2,594-600, without further specifying this; Hes. Cat. 65 speaks of blinding). The same subject was probably dealt with by Sophocles in his tragedy Thamyris (TrGF 4 F 236-245), in which the poet himself appeared as an actor (Soph. Test. Ha …

Thanatos

(298 words)

Author(s): Ambühl, Annemarie (Groningen)
[German version] (Θάνατος/ Thánatos). Personification of death in Greek art and mythology, of practically no cultic significance. T. is the son of Nyx (night) and the twin brother of Hypnos (Sleep, cf. Somnus; Hes. Theog. 211f.; 756f.; Hom. Il. 14,231) with whom he transported the body of the dead Sarpedon [1] from Troy to Lycia (Hom. Il. 16,453-457; 16,671-683). This scene, a favourite on Attic vases from the late 6th cent. BC on, was adopted into every-day life in that T. and Hypnos function as e…

Thapsa

(51 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] (Θάψα). North African harbour town (Ps.-Scyl. 111; the place name is Punic), probably identical to Rusicade. In the 4th cent. BC, a distinction may possibly have been made between Cape Rusicade and the settlement Th. Huß, Werner (Bamberg) Bibliography AAAlg, Bl. 8, Nr. 196  H. Treidler, s. v. Th., RE 5 A, 1271 f.

Thapsacus

(223 words)

Author(s): Röllig, Wolfgang (Tübingen)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Xenophon (Θάψακος/ T hápsakos; Latin Thapsacus). City in Syria, on the west bank of the Euphrates [2], important river port and Euphrates crossing (Semitic tiphsaḥ, 'crossing, ford'), first mentioned in 1 Kings 5,4 as a (fictional) border town in the northeast of Solomon's kingdom. It was at T. that Cyrus [3] the Younger crossed the Euphrates (Xen. An. 1,4,11 and 17 f.); a little later, as nauarchos, Conon [1] came to T., 20 days travel from the Cilician Gates [1] (Diod. Sic. 14,21,5), from where the river …

Thapsus

(352 words)

Author(s): Falco | Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
(Θάψος/ Thápsos). [German version] [1] Tongue of land on the east coast of Sicily Flat, sandy (Serv. Aen. 3,688) tongue of land on the east coast of Sicily, northwest of Syracusae, connected with the mainland via an isthmus of c. 100 m (Thuc. 6,97,1), modern Penisola di Magnisi. Around 730 BC Lamis from Megara [2] settled on T. after he had abandoned Trotilum and been driven out of Leontini; after his death, his companions left T. in order to make a new home in Megara [3] Hyblaia 7 km to the north (Thuc. 6,4,1). There was an empórion ('trade port') on T. from the 15t…

Thargelia

(230 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (θαργήλια/ Thargḗlia, also Targelia). The main festival connected with Apollo on the 6th and 7th days (resp. birthday of Artemis and Apollo) of the Attic/Ionian month Thargēliṓn (late April to late May). The etymology is not known; in Antiquity the name was linked with a stew, thárgēlos (e.g. Phot. ψ 22), made from first fruits offered up to the god. The importance of the festival is also shown in its onomastic productivity, cf. e.g. the Milesian courtesan T. (Hippias FGrH 6 F 3); indeed the festival was generally of great si…

Tharrus

(182 words)

Author(s): Niemeyer, Hans Georg (Hamburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Sardinia et Corsica | | Etrusci, Etruria | Colonization | Phoenicians, Poeni (Θάρρος/ Thárros; Latin Tharrus). Phoenician settlement (founded shortly before or c. 700 BC) on the western coast of Sardinia on the Sinis peninsula, which encloses to the west the Gulf of Oristano, between two indigenous nuraghic settlements; There are records of contacts with the Orient from the 2nd millennium BC onwards. Rich finds in the necropoleis (gold jewellery) and the topheth (vot…

Tharyps

(120 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel)
[German version] (Θάρυψ/ Tháryps). The T. mentioned in 429 BC as being under the guardianship of a Sabylinthus (Thuc. 2,80,6) is the first undoubtedly historical king of the Molossi. According to Plut. Pyrrhus 1,4 he made a name for himself as the first Molossian ruler by providing the cities with Greek customs, education and benign laws; according to Just. Epit. 17,3,9-13 he was raised in Athens and was the first to institute laws, a council, annually changing officials and a rei publicae forma ('state structure'). Accordingly, the monarch-led federal state may have been c…

Thasos

(1,097 words)

Author(s): Külzer, Andreas (Vienna)
This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Apollo | Macedonia, Macedones | Marble | Peloponnesian War | Pompeius | Education / Culture (Θάσος/ Thásos). [German version] I. Geography Island in the northern Aegean (Aegean Sea); 398 km2, up to 1203 m high, 10 km south-south-west of the mouth of the Nestus [1], separated from the Macedonian mainland by a c. 7 km wide strait, with no particularly deeply carved bays; predominantly marble with deposits of gneiss and mica schist, occasional granite (north-east, south-west); lush vegetation (includin…

Thaulon

(4 words)

see Bouphonia

Thaumaci

(168 words)

Author(s): Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
[German version] (Θαυμακοί/ Thaumakoí). City in Achaea Phthiotis on the northern slopes of the Othrys mountains, on one of the most important routes to Thessaly. Remains of walls and ceramic finds suggest an origin in the 4th cent. BC; the first literary sources refer to events in the 3rd cent. BC, when T. was part of the Aetolian League. T. is mentioned several times in the military conflicts between the Romans, the Aetolians and Philippus [7] V shortly after 200 BC (Liv. 32,4,1-7; 32,4,13; 36,14,…

Thaumacia

(46 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θαυμακίη; Thaumakíē). One of the cities in Magnesia [1] which were represented at Troy with altogether seven ships under the leadership of Philoctetes, today not located (Hom. Il. 2,716-719; Str.  9,5,16; Plin. HN 4,32; cf. Steph. Byz., s. v. Θαυμακία). Antoni, Silke (Kiel)

Thaumas

(89 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θαύμας/ Thaúmas). Son of Pontus [1] and Gaia (or Tethys: Orph. Fr. 117), brother of Nereus, Phorcys [1], Ceto and Eurybia (Hes. Theog. 237 f.; Apollod. 1,10); with Electra [1] (Ozomene: Hyg. Fab. 14,18) father of the Harpies and Iris [1] (Hes. Theog. 265-267; 780; Verg. Aen. 9,5; Ov. Met 4,480 et passim; on the interpretation of the genealogy see Pl. Tht. 155d; Cic. Nat. D. 3,20,51). T. is also named as the father of the river Hydaspes (Nonn. Dion. 26,358-365) and of Arce (Ptol. Chennos 6,6, p. 39 Chatzis). Antoni, Silke (Kiel)

Thaumatopoios, Thaumatourgos

(5 words)

see Entertainers

Theadelpheia

(74 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[German version] (Θεαδέλφεια; Theadélpheia). Village in the Fayyum to the south of Lake Karun near modern (Baṭn) Ihrīt, founded under Ptolemaeus [3] II c. mid-3rd century BC and known from numerous papyrus finds. The chief deity was a crocodile god worshipped under the name Pnepheros. Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) Bibliography 1 A. Calderini, Dizionario, vol. 2, 1977, 240-248; suppl. 1, 1988, 135 f.; suppl. 2, 1996, 66 2 E. Bernand, Recueil des inscriptions grecques du Fayoum, vol. 2, 1981, 1-86.

Theaedetus

(120 words)

Author(s): Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich)
[German version] (Θεαίδητος; Theaídētos) from Rhodes, father of Astymedes [1. 1552], significant moderately Rome-friendly statesman [2. 185, 188]; in the peace treaty of Apamea [2] (Antiochus [5] III) with Cn. Manlius [I 24] Vulso in 189 BC he and Philophron had achieved i.a. the apportionment of Lycia (Lycii) to Rhodes (Pol. 22,5,2; [1. 85; 3. 182]). T. was about 80 years old when he travelled to Rome as naúarchos in the spring of 167 to effect a new alliance, but died there (Pol. 30,5,1-10; 30,21 f.; Liv. 45,25,7-10; [1. 139, 155-158; 4. 200-202]). Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) B…

Theaetetus

(1,081 words)

Author(s): Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna)
(Θεαίτητος; Theaítētos). [German version] [1] T. of Athens, mathematician, c. 400 BC Mathematician, a native of Athens, pupil of Theodorus [2] of Cyrene and later a member of Plato's Academy ( Akadḗmeia ). In Plato's [1] dialogue named after him, T. appears (together with the aged Theodorus [2]) as about fifteen years old in 399 BC; he was therefore born c. 414. Plato describes him as gentle, courageous and quick to apprehend. After he had been wounded in the battle of Corinth, T. contracted dysentery and died in 369. T. contributed substantially to the theory of irrational quantiti…

Theagenes

(873 words)

Author(s): Patzek, Barbara (Wiesbaden) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne) | Beck, Hans (Cologne) | Goulet-Cazé, Marie-Odile (Antony) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Et al.
(Θεαγένης/ Theagénēs). [German version] [1] Tyrant of Megara, 7th cent. BC Tyrant of Megara [2] in the last quarter of the 7th cent. BC; he probably descended from a noble family and maintained hospitality with aristocrats all over Greece. According to a later tradition, when he seized power, he is said to have won the people's confidence in his fight against the city's landowners (by slaughtering their flocks: Aristot. Pol. 5,1305a 21-26) and to have been granted a body guard by the assembly (Aristot. Rh.…

Theages

(136 words)

Author(s): Frede, Michael (Oxford)
[German version] (Θεάγης; Theágēs). Pseudepigraphical author of a work in the style of Pythagoras, Περὶ ἀρετῆς ( Perì aretês, 'On Virtue', two frr. in Stob. 3,76-81 and 81-84 Hense), 1st cent. BC/2nd cent. AD. A T. is mentioned in Iambl. VP 257 and 261 (based on Apollonius [14] of Tyana), not as a Pythagorean, however, but as one of the Thousand of Croton who took part in the democratic revolution against the Pythagoreans, although he was very close to the latter ( ibid. 255). He is also missing in Iamblichus' catalogue of Pythagoreans. The two surviving fragments are strongl…

Theangela

(390 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Education / Culture (Θεάγγελα/ Theángela). City in Caria (Cares), to the east of Halicarnassus, most eastern settlement of the Leleges; a precedessor settlement may have been Συάγγελα/ Syángela (S.), at the modern Alazeytin Kalesi to the west above Çiftlik [1. 112-116, 145-147; 2. 89-96], or on Mount Kaplan to the southwest of modern Etrim [3. 17 note 3, 224 note 33a]. In the 6th/5th cent. BC S. was in the hands of the Carian dynastic family of Pigres, who held a command…
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