Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Theios

(108 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
[German version] (Θεῖος; Theîos). The term Theíōi is found, exclusively in the dative, in several inscriptions, e.g. in a calendar of sacrifices from the period of Hadrian. It is controversial (discussion of the sources: [1]) whether it refers to an independent deity (e.g. as a masculine counterpart to Theia [1]) or is an orthographical variant of the dative of theós ('god') or tò theîon ('the divine', 'the deity'). When Theíōi is linked by kaí ('and') with the name of another deity it is possible to interpret it as a further aspect (or epithet) of that deity. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliograph…

Theisoa

(183 words)

Author(s): Tausend, Sabine
(Θεισόα/ Theisóa). [German version] [1] City in Arcadia City in Arcadia (Arcadians; Paus. 8,27,7: 'near Orchomenus'), at modern Karkalou Mill (1050 m elevation). Remains survive of the acropolis fortifications, the city wall, an Hellenistic sanctuary (IG V 2, 511) and houses. Initially part of Orchomenus [3], in 368 BC T. was incorporated into Megale polis. Made autonomous again by Philopoemen (SEG 14, 455), T. was a member of the Achaean League (cf. Achaeans, Achaea [1]) and minted its own coins. Tausend, Sabine Bibliography S. Dusanic, Notes epigraphiques sur l'histoire ar…

Theke

(104 words)

Author(s): Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
[German version] (θήκη; thḗkē) is a term for any kind of container. In particular, from the 5th/4th cent. BC onwards it is used in texts and inscriptions for niche-shaped burial places, whether for burials in funerary buildings (Melos, 4th cent. BC) and vaults (Hdt. 1,67,3; 2,148,5), or for storing cinerary urns (Alexandria), but not sarkophagoi (Sarcophagus). Latin theca , in contrast, refers exclusively to holders for objects, primarily writing implements. Loculi Neudecker, Richard (Rome) Bibliography E. Saglio, s. v. loculus, DS 3.2, 1904, 1292-1295  A. Hug, s. v. T., RE …

Thela

(61 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Son of Odoacer; elevated by his father to Caesar in Italy ( c. 489-493 AD); from 493 onwards a hostage of Theoderic [3] the Great, after the death of Odoacer (in 493) banished to Gaul and on attempting to return murdered by Theoderic. (Iohannes Antiochenus fr. 241a, FHG 5, 29; Anon. Vales. 11,54). PLRE 2,1064. Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)

Thelepte

(129 words)

Author(s): Huß, Werner (Bamberg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae City in Africa Byzacena (Africa [3]); important road hub, 77 km to the north-northwest of Capsa, modern Medinet el-Kdima, with significant ancient remains. A municipium possibly from the time of Vespasianus, from the time of Traianus [1] a colonia. In 354 AD the dux of Africa Byzacena was resident there (Cod. Iust. 1,27,2,1; cf. It. Ant. 77,4; Tab. Peut. 4,5; Procop. Aed. 6,6,18). Inscriptions: CIL VIII 1, 176-183; 211; 216; 2094; 2565 b; CIL VIII 2, 10032-10037; Suppl. 1, 11263-11273; 4, 23181-23186; [1. 56]. Huß, We…

Thelphusa

(161 words)

Author(s): Tausend, Sabine
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Achaeans, Achaea | Arcadians, Arcadia (Θέλφουσα/ Thélphousa). City in Arcadia (Arcadians) on the left bank of the Ladon [2] at modern T. on the road from Psophis to Heraea (Paus. 8,25,1-11; Hierocles Synekdemos 647,6). Remains survive of the city wall and the agora (colonnade, temple). T. was autonomous in the Archaic and Classical periods, and c. 235 BC a member of the Achaean League (Achaeans; Pol. 2,54,12). Stratus, the fortress in the west of the city, was occupied in the Social War [2] by the …

Themacus

(75 words)

Author(s): Lohmann, Hans (Bochum)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Attica (Θημακός; Thēmakós). Attic mesogeia (?) deme, Erechtheis phyle, from 224/3 BC Ptolemaïs, one bouleutḗs; location unknown. IG II2 1212 (finding site: in vico Kara, modern Ilioupoli) is probably not a decree from T., cf. [1]. Lohmann, Hans (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Whitehead, 392 No. 135. Traill, Attica 15, 38, 62, 69, 75, 112 No. 134, Tab. 1, 13  J. S. Traill, Demos and Trittys, 1986, 126.

Themata, naval

(114 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] Themes of the Byzantine Empire, established from the early 8th cent. AD for the construction and maintenance of a fleet. The most significant of them comprised the whole Mediterranean coast of Asia Minor from Miletus to Cilicia. The capital was probably Attaleia [1], but the crews were predominantly from the mountainous hinterland in the western part of the theme, as is shown by the name 'Theme of the Cibyrrhaeoti', which can be traced to the city of Cibyra about 80 km from the sea in the Carian-Lycian border region. Theme Berger, Albrecht (Berlin) Bibliography 1 H. Ahrwe…

Thematics: Studies in Subject-Matter and Motifs

(2,311 words)

Author(s): Arweiler, Alexander
Arweiler, Alexander [German version] A. General (CT) Thematics investigates literary works in which traditional subjects or motifs are taken up and re-elaborated with a new focus on each occasion (on terminology, cf. [5; 21. 26; 36. 201]). Subjects may be conceived of as traditional constellations of figures and plot (for instance, ancient myths) which, on the one hand, are reduced into motifs as the smallest units important for the plot, and on the other are analysed as the themes each one of them imp…

Thematic vowel

(198 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Vocalic element used (alone or in combination with preceding sounds) to form word stems (Greek θέμα/ théma). In Indo-European languages, TVs typically appear as e and o; they are characteristic of both nominal stems (e.g. the accusative singular Latin agrum, Greek ἀγρόν/ agrón, Sanskrit ájram, from the underlying stem * h2aǵ-r=o- ‘field’, known as the o-declension) and verbal stems (e.g. the present stem * h2aǵ-e/o- underlying Latin agite/agunt, Greek ἄγετε/ἄγουσι(ν) ( ágete/ ágousi(n)), Sanskrit ajata/ajanti ‘drive (imperative plural)’/‘they drive’). O…

Thematology

(5 words)

see Thematology

Theme

(472 words)

Author(s): Berger, Albrecht (Berlin)
[German version] (θέμα /théma, pl. thémata; literally: 'area of deployment' [6]). Byzantine administrative districts that replaced the Roman provincial divisions beginning in the 7th cent. AD: After the loss of Egypt and the Middle East (mid 7th cent. AD), the Roman troops were withdrawn to Asia Minor only to be re-deployed there in the four themes of Anatolia, Armenia, Thracia and Opsikion, each under the command of a strategos (Byzantium II. D. incl. map). By the mid 8th cent., the authority of the provincial administration had been complet…

Themis

(512 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Θέμις/ Thémis, literally 'law, sacred ordinance'). Greek goddess and divine personification of sacred ancient law (cf., in contrast, Dike [1]). She stands for the traditional order of things, be it based on human convention (as in Hom. Od. 14,56 about the correct treatment of strangers) or on nature itself (as in Hom. Od. 9,130 about the 'nature of woman'). She plays an important role in the orderly call for assemblies (cf. Hom. Il. 20,4 f. etc.). Originally, themis probably referred to 'what was laid down', in Mycenaean perhaps the word for 'debt' [1. 25 f., 106, 121]. A…

Themiscyra

(87 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] (Θεμίσκυρα/ Themískyra). Highly fertile coastal region (Hecat. FGrH 1 F 7a; Apollod. 2,101; Plin. HN 6,9; Just. Epit. 2,4,1) or Greek city (at modern Terme, Peripl. m. Eux. 29; Ps.-Scyl. 89; possibly destroyed in the third of the Mithridatic Wars since for later times there is no information) in the north of the Paryadres mountains on the southern shore of the Black Sea (Pontos Euxeinos) on the lower River Thermodon [2], where in Greek myth the Amazons lived (cf. Aesch. PV 724 f.; Hdt. 4,110). Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)

Themison

(339 words)

Author(s): Beck, Hans (Cologne) | Nutton, Vivian (London)
(Θεμίσων; Themísōn). [German version] [1] Tyrant from Eretria [1], 4th cent. BC Tyrant of Eretria [1], who occupied Oropus in 366 BC with some of the town’s exiles. The people controlling the operation were based in Thebes, and assistance also came from there in order to fend off an Athenian counter-attack. After an arbitration tribunal the pólis went to the Thebans, who maintained T.’s regime (Diod. Sic. 15,76,1; Dem. Or. 18,99; Xen. Hell. 7,4,1). Beck, Hans (Cologne) Bibliography J. Buckler, The Theban Hegemony, 1980, 193 f. [German version] [2] Th. from Laodicea Greek doctor, …

Themisonium

(124 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Education / Culture (Θεμισώνιον/ Themisṓnion). City in southwestern Phrygia (Str. 12,8,13; Paus. 10,32,4; Ptol. 5,2,26; Hierocles, Synekdemos 666,3), presumably to the north of Acıpayam at modern Dodurga in the valley of the Kazanes (coins: BMC Phrygia 418 f.); this river can probably be identified as the Casus (modern river Karayük), which Manlius [I 24] crossed on his march from Tabae to Cibyra in 189 BC (cf. Liv. 38,14,1). T. was named after Themison, a fri…

Themista

(100 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris)
[German version] (Θεμίστα; Themísta). One of the women philosophers of the Epicurean School; at the beginning of the 4th cent. BC the wife of Leonteus [2] (Diog. Laert. 10,5,25); they had a son called Epicurus (Diog. Laert. 10,26). Cicero praises T.'s 'wisdom' ( sapientia) and names her as the author of numerous writings ( tanta volumina, Cic. Pis. 63). Epicurus addressed a number of letters (Excerpt: Diog. Laert. 10,5 = fr. 125 Usener) and a work Neocles to T. (Νεοκλῆς πρὸς Θεμίστα; Diog. Laert. 10,28) to her. Nothing of her work survives. Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) Bibliography M. Erler, i…

Themistius

(698 words)

Author(s): R.TO.
(Θεμίστιος; Themístios). Commentator on Aristotle (Aristotle, commentators on) and politician ( c. AD 317 - c. 385). [German version] I. Life Commentator on Aristotle and politician, c. AD 317-385 T. was probably born in Paphlagonia, and received his training in rhetoric and philosophy from his father Eugenius, himself a philosopher (Them. Or. 20). Between c. AD 345 and 355, he led his own school of philosophy at Constantinople, preparing paraphrases (some with detailed exegesis) of Aristotelian writings in conjunction with his teaching (cf. Aristo…

Themisto

(137 words)

Author(s): Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich)
(Θεμιστώ; Themistṓ). [German version] [1] Daughter of the Lapith Hypseus Daughter of the Lapith Hypseus, third wife of Athamas (Herodoros 31 F 38 FGrH; Apollod. 1,84; Ath. 13,560d; Nonn. Dion. 9,305-307; Tzetz. Lykophr. 22), who is the father of her several children. Her predecessors were Nephele [1] and Ino. When the latter returns, T., tries to kill her children (Hyg. Fab. 4,239, otherwise in Fab. 1). By means of a change of clothing Ino causes T. to kill her own children, whereupon T. takes her own life. Harder, Ruth Elisabeth (Zürich) [German version] [2] Ancestor of the Arcadians Daught…

Themistocles

(904 words)

Author(s): Kinzl, Konrad (Peterborough)
[German version] (Θεμιστοκλῆς). Athenian, of the Phrearrhii deme in the Leontis phyle, and of the family of the Lycomidae, b. c. 525 BC, the son of Neocles [1] (Hdt. 7,143 et alibi; Nep. T. 1,1; Plut. T. 1,1 and 4; Aristid. 5,4) and a perhaps non-Athenian mother (cf. Nep. T. 1,1; Plut. T. 1,2); an important politician at the time of the Persian Wars [1]. Mnesiphilus is said to have been the teacher of T., who was reputed to have been headstrong (cf. Thuc. 1,138,3; Nep. T. 1,2; Plut. T. 2) and to set little store by artistic education (Ion …
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