Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Transitorial Style

(8 words)

see Corinthian vases; Proto-Corinthian vases

Translatio

(166 words)

Author(s): Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[German version] [1] see Status [1] A. see Status [1] A. Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen) [German version] [2] Legal expression Translatio iuris ('transfer of rights') finds expression in the famous phrase: "A person cannot transfer to another person rights greater than those he has himself" (' nemo plus iuris transferre potest quam ipse habet', Ulp. Dig. 50,17,54). This formula from the early 3rd cent. AD reflects the concept in classical Roman law that subjective rights do not emerge anew in the person receiving them -- as was assumed in the ear…

Translatio Imperii

(7 words)

see Sacrum Imperium

Translation

(7,304 words)

Author(s): Balzert, Monika | Landfester, Manfred (Gießen RWG)
Balzert, Monika [German version] A. Concept and Function (CT) Today, translation is understood as both the process and result of reproducing words, sentences and texts of an original language into a target language. Translating serves communication and interaction and is 'culturally' determined. In translation theory, translating is even a partial aspect of communicative action: the translator must not only master the target and the original language and be in possession of specialist knowledge, but must…

Translations

(4,791 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Görgemanns, Herwig (Heidelberg) | L.FL. | Binder, Vera (Gießen)
I. Ancient Orient and Egypt [German version] A. General Points Translation by means of an interpreter (Akkadian targumannu; Ugaritic targumiānu; Hittite tarkummija- ('to translate'); Aramaic ta/urgmānā; Arabic tu/arǧumān; Italian turcimanno; cf. dragoman) played an important role in the cultures of the Ancient Orient in their contacts with other ethnic groups. Mesopotamian rulers prided themselves on their command of foreign languages. Especially during the second half of the second millennium BC, Akkadian served as a kind …

Transmarisca

(157 words)

Author(s): Burian, Jan (Prague)
[German version] (Τρασμαρίσκα/ Trasmaríska). Roman fort in Moesia Inferior (Moesi with map) on the right bank of the lower Danube (Ister [2]; Ptol. 3,10,11: Τρομαρίσκα/ Tromaríska; Procop. Aed. 4,7,7; Geogr. Rav. 4,7,1: Stamarisca) between Sexaginta Prista (modern Ruse) and Durostorum, modern Tutrakan (county of Silistra, Bulgaria). T. gained significance from the 2nd cent. AD onwards, when the Cohors I Thracum was temporarily stationed in the fort. At the end of the 3rd cent. increased defence measures were taken on the lower Danube (Limes V), the fo…

Transmission

(13,779 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Clemens, Lukas | Faveri, Lorena De | Gastgeber, Christian | Klopsch, Paul
Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) I. Material Remains (CT) A. General (CT) [German version] 1. Introduction (CT) The present article offers a survey of the ways in which material remains from the ancient world have been transmitted to the modern age. Not included are the active acquisition of antiquities for display or their representation in art museums, or the systematic post-Classical acquisition of remains for research purposes (cf. Antiquarianism; Antiquities, collections of; Classical Archaeology;  Art works, acquisition of/ Art theft; Museum). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) …

Transmission of disease

(307 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Latin contagio, ‘infection’, refers to the transmission of disease (TD) from person to person, directly or through an intermediary. TD is associated with the idea of pollution: Judaism, for instance, holds that people suffering from certain diseases (such as leprosy) or menstruating women must be avoided (Purification). The stated reasons were either hygienic or religious. Similar precepts are known from ancient Babylon and Greece as well. The observation that those in close contac…

Transpadana

(154 words)

Author(s): Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] General term for the area to the north of the Padus (modern Po; cf. Cic. Off. 3,22,88; Catull. 39,13: Transpadanus; [1. 274; 2. 149; 3. 28 f.; 4. 7 f.]), as an adjective connected only with Italia (Tac. Hist. 2,32; CIL X 3870), never with Gallia. Augustus' regional reform recognises a regio XI T. bounded in the east by the Ollius ( Regio with map; Plin. HN 3,123; Tac. Hist. 1,70; Plin. Ep. 6,6). Towards the end of the 3rd cent. AD, T. was understood to be the whole of the Padus plain to the south of the Alpes; divided in the 4th cent. into Aemilia and Liguria [5. 236 f.; 6. …

Transport

(9 words)

see Camel; Land transport; Navigation; Wagon, Chariot

Transport amphorae

(1,875 words)

Author(s): Docter, Roald Fritjof (Amsterdam)
[German version] I. Definition and ancient terminology Transport amphorae (TA) are two-handled ceramic vessels manufactured for the transportation and storage of foodstuffs. The Latin term amphora derives from the Greek ἀμφορεύς/ amphoreús, from the older ἀμφιφορεύς/ amphiphoreús (Hom. Il. 23,92; 23,170); the term is also used for the vessels nowadays called stamnos and pelike (cf. Pottery A.; Amphora [1]; with ill.). Unpainted TA were more frequently referred to as κέραμος/ kéramos or κεράμιον/ kerámion (Hom. Il. 9,46; Hdt. 3,6) and ἀγγεῖον/ angeîon (Ps.-Aristot. Mir. 136).…

Transvectio equitum

(365 words)

Author(s): Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover)
[German version] Parade of the iuventus of Roman equites on 15 July. Its route led from the Temple of Mars to the Porta Capena, the Temple of Castor and Pollux, and up to the Temple of Iuppiter Optimus Maximus on the  Capitolium (sources: Liv. 9,46,15; Vir. ill. 32,2). There are mythical/cultic and constitutional versions of the origins of this institution, whose beginnings can be traced to the 4th cent. BC. The first is connected with the help given by the Dioscuri in the battle between the Romans and …

Trapetum

(4 words)

see Presses

Trapeza

(10 words)

see Delphica; Furniture III B ; Monopodium; Table

Trapezites

(136 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena)
[German version] (τραπεζίτης/ trapezítēs). Leader in Egypt of the state bank (Ptolemaic: basilikḕ trápeza, 'royal bank'; Roman period: dēmosía trápeza, 'public bank') in the mētropóleis (Metropolis) of the nomes ( Nomos [2]) but also in smaller towns. The trapezites changed money, collected taxes and other monies intended for the state exchequer and passed them on to the Basilikón (Royal Exchequer). His role is comparable with those of the sitólogos ('grain commissioner') and the kollybistḗs ('money changer'). Under the Ptolemies trapezitai usually leased their posts; from…

Trapezophoron

(5 words)

see Table utensils

Trapezopolis

(140 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg)
[German version] (Τραπεζόπολις/ Trapezópolis). City in Caria (Ptol. 5,2,18; Cares) on the northern slopes of Mount Cadmus (modern Baba) in the Salbacus mountains (modern Akdağ); scant remains of the city are at Bolu to the west of Denizli. As well as in inscriptions and on coins (1st-3rd cents. AD) T. is particularly well attested in late Antiquity literary sources. T. was part of the Conventus of Alabanda (Plin. HN 5,109). T. enjoyed close relations with the neighbouring city of Attuda (modern Hasköy; cf. Homónoia coins under Antoninus [1] Pius). In the 4th cent. AD T. was …

Trapezus

(981 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
This item can be found on the following maps: Sassanids | Pontos Euxeinos | Syria | Byzantium | Urarṭu | Christianity | Xenophon | | Commerce | Hellenistic states | Colonization | Limes | Pompeius | Patricius (Τραπεζοῦς/ Trapezoûs; Lat. Trapezus; the modern Trabzon, Turkey). [German version] I. Geographical Situation A Greek city in the region of Colchis (Xen. An. 4,8,22; 5,3,2) on the southeast coast of the Black Sea (Pontos Euxeinos), situated in a favourable setting with a secure acropolis. T. may have been first founded as early as 756 BC (…

Trapheia

(64 words)

Author(s): Fell, Martin (Münster)
[German version] (Τράφεια; Trápheia). Polis in Boeotia (Nic. Ther. 887-889), known for cattle breeding (Steph. Byz. s. v. T.), either where the combined Rivers Ismenus and Thespius flow into the southeastern bay of Hylice, where there was an extensive settlement [1. 244-246], or on the other bank at the kastron of modern Hylike [2. 2222]. Fell, Martin (Münster) Bibliography 1 Fossey 2 E. Kirsten, s. v. T., RE 6 A, 2221-2223.

Traulus Montanus

(36 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Sex. T. M. Young Roman equestrian, whom Messalina [2] made her lover for one night. After her death (AD 48), he was executed (Tac. Ann. 11,36,3; Sen. Apocol. 13,4). Eck, Werner (Cologne)
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