Brill’s New Pauly

Get access Subject: Classical Studies
Edited by: Hubert Cancik and Helmuth Schneider (Antiquity) and Manfred Landfester (Classical Tradition).
English translation edited by Christine F. Salazar (Antiquity) and Francis G. Gentry (Classical Tradition)

Brill´s New Pauly is the English edition of the authoritative Der Neue Pauly, published by Verlag J.B. Metzler since 1996. The encyclopaedic coverage and high academic standard of the work, the interdisciplinary and contemporary approach and clear and accessible presentation have made the New Pauly the unrivalled modern reference work for the ancient world. The section on Antiquity of Brill´s New Pauly are devoted to Greco-Roman antiquity and cover more than two thousand years of history, ranging from the second millennium BC to early medieval Europe. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between Greco-Roman culture on the one hand, and Semitic, Celtic, Germanic, and Slavonic culture, and ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on the other hand. The section on the Classical Tradition is uniquely concerned with the long and influential aftermath of antiquity and the process of continuous reinterpretation and revaluation of the ancient heritage, including the history of classical scholarship. Brill´s New Pauly presents the current state of traditional and new areas of research and brings together specialist knowledge from leading scholars from all over the world. Many entries are elucidated with maps and illustrations and the English edition will include updated bibliographic references.

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Upis

(5 words)

see Opis, Upis

Uplistsikhe

(117 words)

Author(s): Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jena)
[German version] Georgian 'ruler fortress' (Kartlis Cḫovreba p. 17; 33 et passim) [1]. Rock-cut city (9.5 ha) in Iberia [1], about 20 km to the east of Gori on the northern bank of the Cyrus [5] (1st millennium BC to 18th cent. AD). In the Roman Imperial period U. was expanded into a city with ditches and clay-brick walls on a stone foundation; the cave sites were partly inspired by the Hellenistic rock-cut architecture of Asia Minor. A system of streets with drainage channels and cisterns survives. The city was significant in the Georgian Middle Ages. Plontke-Lüning, Annegret (Jen…

Ur

(542 words)

Author(s): Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Mesopotamia (modern Tall al-Muqayyar; Sumerian uriki ; in the OT Ūr kaśdīm, cf. Gn 11,28 and 31; 15,7 i.a.; no Greek name, since it was abandoned in the 4th cent. BC). City in the southernmost part of Babylonia, discovered and identified in 1854 by J. E. Taylor. Excavations on a larger scale took place under C. L. Woolley in 1922-1934, which became well-known because of the discovery of royal tombs with burial gifts of gold, silver and coloured stones. The orig…

Uraias

(112 words)

Author(s): Lütkenhaus, Werner (Marl)
[German version] Nephew of Witigis (on the name cf. [1. 430]), secured Goth power in Liguria in AD 538/9 and conquered Mediolanum [1] (Procop. Goth. 2,18,19; 2,21). His attempt to end the Byzantines' siege of Auximum remained unsuccessful; the loss of Liguria in 539 prevented him supporting Witigis in Ravenna (Procop. Goth. 2,28,31-35). After the latter's capture in 540, U. refused an offer of the title of king of the Goths and proposed Hildebaldus for it (Procop. Goth. 2,30,3-16). After a conflict with Hildebaldus, he was murdered in 541 (Procop. Goth. 3,1,37-48). Lütkenhaus, Werner …

Urania

(271 words)

Author(s): Walde, Christine (Basle)
(Οὐρανία/ Ouranía, Latin Urania). [German version] [1] Muse who surveys the course of the world One of the Muses (Hes. Theog. 78), mother of Linus (father Apollo: Excerpta ex Hygino 174 Rose) and Hymenaeus [1] (Catull. 61,2). From remarks in Plato (Phaed. 259d) and from the time of Aratus [4] onwards, U. can clearly be identified as patron of Astronomy/Astrology (pictorial representations with globe, pointer; [1]), the natural sciences and - because of her cosmic dimension (U. brings light into the darkness) -…

Uraniones

(121 words)

Author(s): Antoni, Silke (Kiel)
(Οὐρανίωνες; Ouraníōnes). [German version] [1] Term for the descendants of Uranus Term for the descendants of Uranus in general (Hes. Theog. 461; 919) and for the Titans in particular (Hom. Il. 5,898; Orph. fr. 57; Suda s. v. Οὐ.). For a list of all U. see [1. 973-975]. Antoni, Silke (Kiel) Bibliography 1 E. Wüst, s. v. Uranos, RE 9 A, 966-980. [German version] [2] Collective term for the Greek gods 'The Heavenly Ones', collective term for the Greek gods in general, sometimes with the addition of θεοί/ theoí ('gods'; e.g. Hom. Il. 1,570; Hom. Od. 7,242; Orph. fr. 168,15; Q. S…

Uranius

(384 words)

Author(s): Schottky, Martin (Pretzfeld) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Gärtner, Hans Armin (Heidelberg)
(Οὐράνιος/ Ouránios). [German version] [0] Usurper, mid 3rd cent. L. Iulius Aurelius Sulpicius Severus U. Antoninus, usurper, who had coins minted in Emesa in 253/4; very likely identical with the priest of Aphrodite Sampsigeramus (Ioh. Mal. 12 p. 296 f.) who warded off an attack on Emesa by the Persian army in 253, in the course of which their leader (in the text Sapor [1] I himself) was killed. It may be that Or. Sib. 13,158-171 and IGLS 1799-1801 also refer to these events. When with Valerianus' [2] d…

Uranopolis

(169 words)

Author(s): Zahrnt, Michael (Kiel) | Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart)
(Οὐρανόπολις/ Ouranópolis). [German version] [1] City on Acte City on Acte (Athos I), founded by Alexarchus, the younger brother of Cassander; according to Plin. HN 4,37 and Str. 7a,1,35, it is to be found on the isthmus of Acte. U. can be connected with the extensive ruins south-west of the modern Ierissos, the extent of which agrees with the size of the city given by Str. loc cit. (30 stadia). U. was probably built c. 315 BC, minted its own coins according to a standard uncommon in Macedon at the time, but does not appear to have lasted long and may have merged wit…

Uranus

(418 words)

Author(s): Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
[German version] (Οὐρανός, Lat. Uranus). Divine personification of the sky, treated by Hesiodus (Theog. 126-128) as a mythical figure. U. is born of Gaia, the earth, without the contribution of a father, 'so that he may wrap her up and the gods have a permanent seat in him' (ibid.). After that, U. begets the Uraniones with Gaia (ibid. 424; 486), namely the Titans, including Kronos, Zeus' father. As a result, U. is the progenitor of the gods (ibid. 44 f.; 105 f.). The Cyclopes and the Hekatoncheires …

Urartian

(197 words)

Author(s): MI.SA.
[German version] Language of the royal cuneiform inscriptions of Urarṭu. Urartian belongs neither to the Semitic nor to the Indo-European families of languages, but is related only to Hurrian, which is attested as early as the late 3rd millennium BC. The term 'Asianic languages', coined for Hurritic-Urartian, Elamite, Sumerian etc., is a makeshift solution. In terms of linguistic typology,  Urartian is agglutinating and ergative; consequently, it is examined in relation with completely different l…

Urarṭu

(357 words)

Author(s): MI.SA.
[German version] Country in the Armenian highlands (9th-7th cents. BC; cf. map) with a distinctive culture, in constant confrontation with Assyria (Mesopotamia [III D]). Military high points were the victory of the Urartian King Argishtis I over Assur-nirārī V in the first half of the 8th cent., the clash between Sarduri II and Tiglath-Pileser [2] III on the Euphrates border in 743 BC and the long struggle for control over north-western Iran between Rusa I and Sargon [3] II (722-705), which culmin…

Urbanae cohortes

(287 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] Augustus established three cohorts on military lines for the purpose of 'policing' Rome (Police). They bore the numbers X-XII, which demonstrates their close association with the nine cohorts of the Praetorians. They were also accommodated in the same camp ( castra praetoria), while being under the command not of the praefectus praetorio , but the praefectus urbi . This could occasion differing political loyalties (cf. Suet. Claud. 10,3 after the death of Caligula). The UC had the maintenance of peace in the city as t…

Urban development

(7 words)

see Hippodamus Town planning

Urbanus

(82 words)

Author(s): Schmidt, Peter Lebrecht
[German version] M. Damatius U., author of a (4th-cent. AD) commentary on the poems of Vergilius, which deals with earlier commentators (Cornutus [4], Velius [3] Longus) and - in addition to Carminius and Donatus [3] - constitutes the foundation of Servius's [2] commentary; its influence on Servius is likely to have exceeded the 11 quotations that survive. Schmidt, Peter Lebrecht Bibliography S. Timpanaro, Per la storia della filologia virgiliana antica, 1986, 129-134 R. Kaster, Guardians of Language, 1988, 438 P. L. Schmidt, in: HLL 5, § 526.3.

Urbicius

(110 words)

Author(s): Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
[German version] (Οὐρβίκιος; Ourbíkios). Recorded as an Eastern Roman praepositus sacri cubiculi under Theodosius [3] II from AD 434 and again under Leo [4] I and Zeno. He did encourage the usurper Basiliscus against Zeno in 475, but in 476 contributed to his overthrow. He was close to Verina, the widow of Leo I, and in 481 probably also supported a conspiracy against Illus, who had arrested her. He is last recorded as an advocate of the election of the emperor Anastasius [1] I in 491 and as a sponsor of pious foundations in Edessa [2] and in the Holy Land in 504/5. PLRE 2, 1188-1190. Tinnefeld, Fr…

Urbicus

(8 words)

see Lollius [II 4] Q.L. Urbicus

Urbs Vetus

(65 words)

Author(s): Morciano, Maria Milvia (Florence)
[German version] (Οὐρβιβεντός/ Ou rbibentós; modern Orvieto). Etruscan city in the valley of the Pallia (modern Paglia) on a high tuff outcrop (cf. the description of the site of the city in  Procop. Goth. 2,20,5-11; cf. Geogr. Rav. 4,36: Orbevetus; Paulus Diaconus, Historia Langobardorum 4,32;  Procop. Goth. 2,11,1; 2,18,19), its identification with Volsinii Veteres is controversial. Morciano, Maria Milvia (Florence) Bibliography BTCGI 13, 1-88.

Urgulania

(91 words)

Author(s): Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] Wife of M. Plautius (AE 1972,162), mother of M. Plautius [II 12] Silvanus, grandmother of Plautia [1] Urgulanilla, the wife of Claudius [III 1]. She abused her friendship with Livia [2], who ended up paying a fine (Tac. Ann. 2,34,4) after U. had refused to appear in court. Later she sent a dagger to her convicted grandson M. Plautius [II 13] (Tac. Ann. 4,21,1). Subject of  the novel  ‘Le Mystère du jardin romain by J.-P. Néraudau. Strothmann, Meret (Bochum) Bibliography C. M. Perkounig, Livia Drusilla - Iulia Augusta, 1995, 176 f.  PIR V 684.

Urgulanilla

(7 words)

see Plautia [1] P. Urgulanilla

Uria

(319 words)

Author(s): Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Vanotti, Gabriella (Novara)
[German version] [1] City of the Sal(l)entini City of the Sal(l)entini, founded by Idomeneus [1] (Varro in Prob. in Verg. Ecl. 6,31), probably identical with Οὐερητόν/ Ouerētón (Str. 6,3,5: originally Barís; Ptol. 3,1,76; Tab. Peut. 7,2: Veretum) at Cape Leuca; modern Santa Maria di Vereto on the eastern coast of Italy with ancient remains; Messapian and Roman inscriptions [1; 2]. Str. 6,3,6 is unclear as to whether Hyrie at Hdt. 7,170 is to be identified with U. [1] or U. [2]. Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) Bibliography 1 C. Pagliara, Fonti per la storia di Veretum, in: Annali della F…
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