Brill’s New Pauly Supplements II - Volume 8 : The Reception of Antiquity in Renaissance Humanism

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London
(1,159 words)

A. Cultural significance, court, residences

Early modern L. was the residence of the English monarch, the seat of Parliament and the highest courts of the land, a commercial metropolis and the largest city in England, with a population that increased from around 45,000 in 1500 to 80,000 in 1560, 180,000 in 1603 and 350,000 in 1650 [9.42 f.]. The court, the law schools of the Inns of Court and the city's location as a port, which made L. the starting-point for voyages of trade and discovery, a destination for foreign merchant ships and a place of ref…

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Kullmann, Thomas (Osnabrück), “London”, in: Brill’s New Pauly Supplements II - Volume 8 : The Reception of Antiquity in Renaissance Humanism, English edition by Chad M. Schroeder (2017). Original German-language edition: Renaissance-Humanismus. Herausgegeben von Manfred Landfester. Serie: Der Neue Pauly Supplemente 2. Staffel, herausgegeben von Manfred Landfester und Helmuth Schneider, vol. 9. Stuttgart, Germany. Copyright © J.B. Metzlersche Verlagsbuchhandlung und Carl Ernst Poeschel Verlag GmbH (2014). Consulted online on 20 May 2019 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/2468-3418_bnps8_SIM_004902>
First published online: 2015



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