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Acetabulum
(122 words)

[German version]

From Latin acetum (vinegar); this goblet-shaped vessel with an indented wall profile served as a container for vinegar and honey, as a table and cooking vessel as well as a wax melting utensil; also used as a beaker amongst conjurers. Usually, the acetabulum was made of clay or glass, sometimes of precious metal. Its volume was very small (0,068 l [1]); in Apicius (6,8,3) and Apici excerpta a Vindario VI, the acetabulum is also equivalent to a cooking vessel.

 Catinus

Bibliography

1 F. Hultsch, s. v. A., RE I, 155 f.

G. Hilgers, Lat. Gefäßnamen, …

Cite this page
Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Acetabulum”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 24 July 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e101770>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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