Brill’s New Pauly

Get access
Search Results: | 84 of 235 |

Aisymnetes
(276 words)

[German version]

(αἰσυμνήτης; aisymnḗtēs). Formed from aísa (‘fate’) and  mna (‘to have in mind’): ‘one who has fate in mind (and announces it to the one it affects)’. The Phaeacians (Hom. Od. 8,258-9) name nine aisymnetai, who are responsible for contests (agones), in the Iliad 24,347 a prince's son appears as aisymnḗtēs. Aristotle sees in the aisymnetes of ancient Greece a kind of monarch, a ‘chosen tyrant’, as demonstrated in  Pittacus of Mytilene around 600 (Pol. 3,1285a 29 - b 1). In the 5th cent. the word appears in Teos synonymously with ‘tyrant’ (Syll.3 38 = ML 30,A; SEG 31,985…

Cite this page
Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham), “Aisymnetes”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 30 October 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e111020>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



▲   Back to top   ▲