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Antomosia
(95 words)

[German version]

(ἀντωμοσία; antōmosía) was in Greece, in particular in Athens, an oath, which both parties had to make in the preliminary examination or in the main proceedings, probably a relic from archaic legal procedure. By means of the antomosia the truth of the plaint and the answer to the plaint was substantiated in advance. Therefore the name also extended to the pleas ( Antigraphe). The antomosia was not adopted by Plato (Leg. 948d).

Bibliography

A. R. W. Harrison, The Law of Athens I, 1971, 99 f.

G. Thür, Greek Law, ed. by L. Foxhall, 1996, 63 f.

Cite this page
Thür, Gerhard (Graz), “Antomosia”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 26 June 2022 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e125890>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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