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Children's Games
(662 words)

[German version]

The educational value of children's games was already known in antiquity; thus Plato (Pl. Leg. 643b-c; cf. Aristot. Pol. 7,17,1336a) saw in games imitating the activities of adults a preparation for later life. Quintilian (Quint. Inst. 1,1,20; 1,1,26; 1,3,11) fostered guessing games, games with ivory letters and learning in games in order to promote the child's mental capacities; for this purpose, the ostomáchion game (loculus Archimedius) -- in which 14 variously shaped geometric figures had to be placed into a square or objects, people or ani…

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Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg), “Children's Games”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 29 November 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e613980>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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