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Dextans
(139 words)

[German version]

In the Roman system of weights and measures, dextans describes 10/12 of the whole and is derived from deesse and sextans, i.e. 1 as (12 unciae) less 1 sextans. The dextans was used in the measurement of length (pes), the measurement of area (iugerum), in the law of succession and in the calculation of hours. Based on the Roman pound (libra: 327.45 g), the dextans weighs 272.88 g [1. 296]. Bronze mintings of 10 unciae in the sextantal or somewhat lighter standard were issued in Luceria as a compensatory coin for the Roman as shortly after 211 BC for a…

Cite this page
Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover), “Dextans”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 10 December 2018 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e316190>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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