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Dragon slayers
(519 words)

[German version]

Dragons, from the Greek δράκων (drákōn) derived from δέρκομαι (dérkomai) ‘to look at penetratingly’ (Porph. De abstinentia 3,8,3), are mythical beings combining the superhuman qualities of various animals [1]. In mythology the world of humans was threatened by amphibious snakes (synonym: ὄφις; óphis, Hom. Il. 12,202/208), fish (κῆτος; kḗtos) or composite creatures. Only a hero could hold up against their power, gaze, odour and fiery breath, multiple heads and limbs. Victory over the dragon freed mankind from mortal peril, and t…

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Auffarth, Christoph (Tübingen), “Dragon slayers”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 05 December 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e323990>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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