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Invictus
(171 words)

[German version]

(‘the undefeated’, ‘invincible’). Epithet of Roman emperors since  Commodus. Already in the Republican period, this epithet was occasionally bestowed on victorious military leaders (e.g.  Cornelius [I 71] Scipio), It is known that  Traianus [1] bore the Greek epithet ἀνίκητος/aníkētos (of the same meaning). Commodus was the first to turn it into a permanent imperial epithet; this must be understood in the context of his veneration of  Hercules. Only with the Severans ( Severan dynasty) did Invictus lose this connotation and referred to the triumphancy …

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Groß-Albenhausen, Kirsten (Frankfurt/Main), “Invictus”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 05 July 2020 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e12222970>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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