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Litatio
(188 words)

[German version]

(‘fortunate sacrifice’). From the Latin litare (based on Greek λιτή/litḗ, ‘entreaty’) = ‘to sacrifice under favourable auspices’ (intransitive) in contrast to sacrificare (‘to sacrifice’). The distinction between the two verbs litare and sacrificare disappeared in the Augustan period, as they were used synonymously. Litatio was a technical term of Roman pontifical law (cf. Serv. Aen. 2,119) for the favourable course and completion of an act of sacrifice, by which the desired influence upon the deity (pax deorum, ‘grace of the gods’) was ensured. The party…

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Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover), “Litatio”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 21 June 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e706380>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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