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Lytron
(274 words)

[German version]

(λύτρον/lýtron, mostly used in the plural λύτρα/lýtra). The ransom for prisoners of war was called lytron in Greek (similarly: ἄποινα/ápoina). The expression was also used for buying the freedom of victims of piracy. Buying the freedom of prisoners was, alongside exchanging prisoners, enslaving or killing, a common practice in Greek warfare from Homeric (Hom. Il. 6,425ff.; 11,106) to Hellenistic times. According to Ducrey [1], selling into slavery was, of course, more common than buying a person's freedom, the t…

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Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle), “Lytron”, in: Brill’s New Pauly, Antiquity volumes edited by: Hubert Cancik and , Helmuth Schneider, English Edition by: Christine F. Salazar, Classical Tradition volumes edited by: Manfred Landfester, English Edition by: Francis G. Gentry. Consulted online on 06 March 2021 <http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1574-9347_bnp_e715200>
First published online: 2006
First print edition: 9789004122598, 20110510



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